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North Carolina Newspapers

Carolina watchman. volume (Salisbury, N.C.) 1832-1867, October 25, 1849, Page 1, Image 1

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V I i y i ! ITcr n lot the IVntcliinnn. " , ' I t- S iJvnce, .'.ti J V: S.V. t fV tW first. and 25 eta. lHWririf v - 1 ft ! fSrih V.t A liberal deduc- J ll those ibo tdmi-sety the year ' .t l' tvl:.. Mint k rvnot nald, Vt I XHI: . - JfC,Wip.Iert. . . ,: Tki notUM Weekly Hyn.bol " thu. -urn- up the do Jlt t2 fSWi V Uki the par -After perusmg ' i V. i -Vo 'h da-' ippIictoi,9, and thus tell over rt !i r "PU the prin- i 'lh t uH the paptr-Tb sure to pay in advance, u)d tl(Vi yo Jjaf the privilege of reading your otrn pa-jn-irad of hi jmhlitMrt'. If yon chancre your retv .ucrl rnfortn bo .publisher immediately, ptatinj your avilnawith plcft You move rem, ana me pia., j '. 1 U -j J.-r.-Tl. only "Lof I-i-rter write, an or- i Utn hate the Mtne lopp-a. ....-v ... f i " . ' . . t -4. . nanora Until lhr rvaf n rr nn. id.' ' If f ou M 10 '"h do not cumplain if the pub ,'' t -wiiiiiuJtrt nend the pawr. . J 4 , - tt tjOUrM - C win"""' wim pap .B iubuubuii lv 1 : - .1 1 1 ; --.j - ' I 1 ' '-i . 1 . - - -., v : -j BRlltSER & JAMES, I J ' - ' " ' ' t!ss?!7' : ( NEW SERIES. 1 JSrfitor. 4-Pnyfoor.. ,. - ) j. I ; j Hgg . Gtl IhnUo.. ( VOLUME VI NUMBER 25. j SSAXISBURY, N. C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1849. J - Li i : - ' - ! ' . vi .ftpr tbte tia fJ' which they firet subscribed ha ttrftred. -.rffrt K'rrtrie ordered. W e never stop a Cfcflcr.pntil I ap-axai'S are paid up, unlera at our op l' Inn u leWf therefore, to order a paper stopped Tt "flltViOl iicapapcr.-l. Subflenbers i r f,i,t jire lexpres. notice to the contrary, are con- forrA M wifhmj to continue their subncrTptions. f. V sulfcribert order the discontinuance of their pa pi;f u)e j,4M'H may continue to .end them until all Sita3pf H5,Vi i 1 li'l'rtb.f neclect or refuse (o take their papers from 0i0'ces i : -which they are directed, they are held rKM)'WJ t'U mey "ae Mtiica tne bin ana order ti thl pnH r b .discontinued.' 'i If nhac6Ujrn remove to, pother places without in ,ij lh itil!il)ers, and the paper is sent to the fir uiff ditw iEi.Hi'j thl'y arc resrxjnBihle. . i Tbfl (inirtnj ha 6 decided that refusing to take a roiwr Min the ofhee, or removui"; and leaving it uncall I. .l. : i. a. J A.:-,, i e i nil IlKt ' , l""""-"! '",-" c"ut VI IlllUUllUIiai lEilUU. t . - - . it. with sriowJ anu tben crept under f heap of dead comrades, leaving however my eyes at libe ty. Soon the Cossacks; reach J ed us, and egan-striking-with their Ian ccs right and left, while their horses tram pled the bodies. Presently one of jlthcse rude bcastsfplaced his hoof on my kt arrri and crushed it to pieces Boys 1 d not say a word a I did not move save to fhrusi my right hand into my mouth to keep down the cry of torture; and in fa few minutes the Cossacks-disappeared. f When the last of them had ridden off, I crept out hnd managed to disinter the captain. He showed few signs bf life nevertheles; I contrived with my one! hand to drag him towards a rock which oTere4 a sort of sh iher, and then lay dowri next to him and wrapped my capote arotjfid us Night was closing in and the snoil cohl tinued to fa I. The last of the reajlguarcj unu long aiappeareu.and tbe only sounds that broke salence were the whistiinf? of CAPTAIN POSITIVE. SOtDIKR S 8TORY. It ft, 5 J A JVepch .veteran with one arm, was seated, be fyre the door of his neat cottage, ocfi pleiiht' evening in: July. He was sarrouricjy by several village lads, who with t)!n !9 i c e t n t r e a t ed h i m t o com m e n ce Vii Drrtinised storv. Th old man took his !pip!e from his mouth, wiped his lips with !;be)back of his remaining hand, and be In by time, boys, Frenchmen would ;ive, scorned to tight with Frenchmen in ao sireets as tney do now. ino, no : wnen re fought, it was for the honor of France, ;and. againkt the foreign enemies. Well, my stor)qrgi'its.on the 9th of November 1312, a fthort time after the battle of Wi- !im. 'i We Wtfrio - beatlnir a. retrofit, not leforo';the IKussiahsi for they kept at a re pectatle distance from our cantonments, W before the biting cohfoT their detesta ble country, more terrible to us than Rus- .11 an 5, Ausirm"? uuu, uaviirmns pui iuge tr. PoVitli'e last few (lavs our nffirprs hadtfterr teJling us mat we were ap-: nroacbin2Sm.olcnsko, where wc should Ibie certair) to find food, tire, brandy and JijiocSl jbut.ini iie meantime we were per $hinjr (n the ce, and perpetually harrass- ed by H Vandb( Cossack riders. t 'We hAd marched for six hours, with out fiausih to draw breath, fop we knew that rfbosci was certain death. A bitter wind hyried the snow flakes against our faces ntid tvov and then we stumbled over Jie tjornsfcsjplj our comrades' No singing ur. taVJin j tlen 1 Even the grumblers H-ootujiyi vviii'iim nuu iiiii was uau Sfl'4l UlliaI Kol.in.1 mi, vtanfoin . U ma ijhorrtnan, strongly built, rugged and severe,' bat brave and true as his own sword .blade.1-. We called him Captain rosmu tor once he said.a thing, so it was no appeal ho never changed his mih(iJle;lKd been wounded at Wiaz mvand .lijs qsually jed face was now qaiti'jiaic!; jjybilc the pieces of an old whitejiandkechief which he had wrap ped ardundhis p tvns nHL-ffl with hlnnd. I saw Wfn first move slowly and then stag ger llkfiia Orutiken man, and at last he fell dddii Uka a block. ; Ut7)iifaw ' captain said I, bending o PrMt; Jou-ctfn'i lie there.' Ypiii tsec.that l,cia, because I do, re pUcdlhpbiiitinS to his limbs. . -Pta aid I, 'you musn't die thus; M(l T?'nS in my arms, I managed to place nifn on his feet. lie leaned on me and tripd ;to walk ; but in vain ; he iclUnco rnord and dragged me with him. Mn said! he .'tis all over. Justleavc meere.'nrid join your, cdlumn as quick "jou can fjne word before you go : ijyoreppe. near Grenoble, lives a good woroao, jeijhtytwo years old, my my distant bullets and the nearer howlfng d wolves, whiph were devourinu theldead bodies. God! knows what thin us was DasJ sing in my tjosom that night whichI felt assured wot Id be my last on earth! I But 1 remembered the prayer that my mother had taught me long ago when I was a child by her side; and kneeling down I said it terve itly. If ' Boys, Tt did me good ; and always re- member thai sincere honest prayeri will do you gootl I felt wonderfully! balnr when I resumed my place by the side of the captain.! But time passed on, sind I was becoming quite numbed, when I saw a party of French officers approajdhing.! Before I had time to address7 them the foremost a low sized man, dressed in a full pelisse stepped towards me sjaVing, What are y ou doing here ! Why diq you stay behind your regiment?' ' For two ood reasons,' said I, poiiiting to the captain, and then to my bleeding arm. ' j I ' The man; speaks the truth, sire4 Isaid one of his fojlowers. I saw him march ing behind tle column carrying this offi cer on bis back, j-j ' The Emperorfor, boys, it was bp ! . gave me ones of those looks which jonly anAIpine gle could give, and said, I'Tis wll. You $ave done very well.' jThen opening his pelisse, he took the j cross which decorated his inside gree;n; coat, and gave it to me. That moment I Iwas no longer cold or hungry, and felt no more pain in my arm than if that ill natured beast bad never touched it. I i Devoust,' added the Emperor, addres sing the gettleman who had spoken, 4 cause this man and captain to be placed on the ammunition wagons. AdieuJIand waving his hand towards me, he passed ADVERTISING. j The New York Tribune, in a labored article on a reform in trade, gives the'fol owing hints, in regard to the tern of ad vertising: . We have remarked that extensive ad vertising is one of the means by which the reform in trade is to be accomplished. The two classes, buyers and sellers, have a common interest in finding each other;" that is to say, it is for the interest of him who can supply a certain want cheapest; to have every buyer aware of the fact; and it is fca the interest of the buyer no less. An expenditure of fifty thousand dollars may not be too much, one of five thousand may be too little for that purpose. If, for example, somebody has discovered as we see it stated in a Southern paper, ai substance, or chemical j compound which will dispense with the labor now required in washing clothes, or the half of it, at a very small cost, the owner of this patent may spend fifty thousand dollars a year in advertising it, and then not spend The Position of Nci&ern. The New- bimsell us very sorry but as they were bernian of the 2nd instant, we are clad to see, has a spirited article on the sub ject of internal improvements. It lays it down as certain, whether the charter of the North Carolina Railroad, in its pre sent shane. be accented or not. that a cpn- tral road, connecting the East and West, rtUIICm,,ons oi me nesi ieenngson Dom will be built. It argues Somewhat against s,dt;s !ne chief and his party returned to the practicability of a! permanent and j the,r bomps and the General and suit sufficient improvement of the Neuse, and wending their way back to this placed in favor of a continuation of the Road di- committed by a small party of unauthor ized persons, who were immediately ta ken into custody, and would be delivered up, he did not think the entire nation should ie held responsible for their acts. Thus ttrminated the conference, iwith riect to Newbern ; and calls upon the citi zens of that place to arouse themselves to action, and assist in pushing forward the enterprise. Connect, (says the wri ter.) the East with the West by a contin uous route of Rail Read jfrom Charlotte to rewbern, by way; of Salisbury and Ra leigh, and then opeh a ship channel, say f)rom some point up on Adam's Creek to Beaufort, and Newbern would be made." These are exactly our sentiments what v?e have repeatedly in our paper and else- I where, urged in behalf of Newbern a enough. There are inventions, within i "wn wn,cn s " mcr. more aeep.y in nni bnlvAcro K Kn.iri0 r i terested in this enterprise if she will a- sands, if the patentees knew how and had Vf" herself of. Its advantages, asshe vimj the enternrise to brin lhem l.nmp. tn thR I -lDan any omer ln tnetale. on. knowledge of all interested.by these fail irigs they will never realise twenty thou sand. Whoever can supply this city cheap est, with almost any article which will meet a general want hitherto more expen sively met, cannot advertise too much if he knows how to advertise at all. And yet many a dealer in our city pays a thousand dollars more for an eligibly lo cated store than he need pay in a less frequented street, and does not pay a hun dred dollars a year for advertising 1 He willingly pays a thousand dollars, merely to let some ten thousand people know that be has certain articles to sej), but grudges five hundred dollars to give the same knowledge to millions." j i ' In reference to this subject the Boston Times says: : "If you want to obtain a situation; if you want to obtain help; if you want to hire or let a house ; if you want to obtain boarders ; if you want to recover anything lost or stolen ; if you want to sell your goods, wares, and merchandise ; finally, if you want to get business, and make mon ey, advertise, advertise." . Will the buisness men of Wilmington iake the hint ? Many of them have alrea dy profited by advertising, yet there is a larger number who have not yet become reconciled to the advantages derived from advertising. Now is the time to com mence. If a proper effort is made, the approaching season will be renowned for its activity in Wilmington, and we hold ourselves ready and willing to afford the public every facility in our power to ac commodate them. The Journal has a more extensive circulation in this town and1 vicinity than any other paper, by at least three to one. Our terms are ' low. arid the more patrons we can get the bet ter enabled we shall be to accommodate But what can she expect, if she jwill continue to shut her eyes, fold her arms, and sleep on in inglorious supinenessf We call on the press there, we call on! her enlightened citizens, some of whom, we know, under stand, and feel the important interest she has at stake, to exert themselves until all tRe people shall see. Rah Star. It rejoices our hearts to see such mani festations of awaking spirit as this of the Newbernian." O; if the large capital of the low country could be enlisted and united with the labor and energy of the West in a thorough scheme of State im provement, (of which the Central Road would be the very Spinal marrow.) how soon would the people of North Carolina become "one and indivisible" in interest, and feeling, and hope, and prosperity ! -1 he JNewbernian says.iwhether the pre sent charter be accepted or not, that a ceritral road, connecting the East and West, will be built. Do not deceive your self, dear sir ! We confess that failure in the present scheme will be destruction to our hopes. We fear there will ever here after be found too many adverse interests, in the East and the West; to permit a cbarter embodying so many elements of success. j iothis is the charter, and now is the time ; let us strike while the iron is hot. Greensboro Patriot. Here the veteran paused, and resumed his pipe. I 1 But tell u$ about the cross and jwhat become of Captain Positive,' cried sever al impatient voices, il 4 The captain still lives, and is now a fntirorl nronbpul Tint ikn Koct nf it nruo that soon as Hh recovered, he nlaceHi me the Wants J the- community.-- Wllming - .i : h i u r j::Ji! i ton Journal. unuer urrest tor uiy urenuii ui uiscijiiiuc 1 The circumstance reached Napoleon's ears ; and after laughing heartily, he not only releasedjme, but promoted me jtj be a surgeant. As to the decoration, here is the ribbon, bays; Lwear that in myj but ton hole, but the cross I carry next!! my heart 1 And unbuttoning his coat, 1 the veteran showed his young friends the pre cious relic, enveloped in a little satin .bag suspended around his neck ANECDOTES FOR YOUNG LADIES, We rememuer somewhere to have read a story of a y)utb, who, hesitating jit his choice between two young ladies, by both of whom he was beloved,bewas brought to a decision py means of a rose. It hap pened one day, as all three were wajnuer irig in a garden, that one of the girls, n hei Dreadful Tornado in Cape M ay. -The most destructive whirlwind that has oc curred in New Jersey since the memora ble tornado at New Brunswick, many years ago, appears to have swept over the upperpart of Cape May County about 5 o'clock on Thursday morning last. A let ter ram Dennisville, some 7 miles from Delaware Bay, to the State Gazette, says it first struck a new two story house be longing to Willis Godfrey, which was torn from its foundations and dashed to pieces. Mrs. G. and two children miraculously escaping : A few rods further, it came in contact with a new story and a half house, in which were the wife of Jones Corson lately married, and her sister, both in bed. ! From the New Orleans Delta. INTERESTING FROjM FLORIDA. Fort Brooke (Tampa Bay) Fla., Sept. 21. ! Dear Delta On the' 15th instant Gen eral Twiggs embarked oi board the stea mer Colonel Clay, for Charlotte s Harbor, the scene of the depredations of the Indi ans for the purpose of holding a "talk"' with the principal chiefs of the Seminole?, as was alluded to iji a previous letter. The General was accompanied by Dr. Randall, Maj. McCall, Asst. Adjt. Gene ral; Capt. Cassey Commissary Department and tiieut. Gibbon, with Capt. Rains com pany of 4th Artillery as a military guard and escort. j The steamer reached Iher destination on the 17th, and anchored near an old trading house on the east! side of the Bay, a few miles from its mouth. Here the head chief, Billy Bow Legs, accompanied with, the acting chief of the Micasookies and several warriors,, wept on board the steamer, and held a "talk" with General Twiggs. j The chief is described as being a fine PRESIDENT TAYLOR. The following passage we extract from a speech 'of Josiali Quincy, Jr., at the late Whig Convention of Massachusetts. We regret, with the distinguished speaker, that it was not in the power of President Taylor to have min Sled in person with the intelligent yeomanry of the Bay State. He is a roan of the fashion and 'he temper to have won among lhem an in stant, an electric popularity, that would have thrilled through their ranks from the Capes to Berkshire, and expelled all the lingering doubts and prejudices that have been so assiduously disseminated in a section where his rare vir tues and noble qualities might well look for the most genial sysmpathy and the most just appreciation. If the people of Massachusetts could see General Taylor as Mr. Quincy saw him; converse with him; know, by personal experience, his gentleness, his kindness, his unassuming spirit, his modesty, his good sense, his good judgement there would not be op position enough left in the State to make a show of hands necessary to indicate the state of opin ion. He would carry everv thinif bv acclama- lion. Republic, " It was my good fortune (said Mr. Quincy) to be at Washington for three or four weeks," about the beginning of last March, and it was my exceeding good fortune to be under the roof with one who was at least called General Tay lor. Sir, I cannot help regretting that his health prevented his having an opportunity of showing himself to the yeomanry and citizens of Massachusetts. I rpgret that they could not sec President Taylor as he appears to all about him. " We are very apt, gentlemen, to judge by what we have seen of -the militia. I remem ber, sir, that I was onco aid lo bis excellency Governor Lincoln, and we thought then that the military had more fuss than feathers, I be lieve. " As regards General Taylor, he is exactly what his soldiers' call him Hough and Ready. He looks no more like one ot those officers whom you will see, on an inspection day, rid. ing about on horseback, with long plumes, than he does like a Methodist minister. I confess. sir, I could not help looking at him with aston ishment as I saw him sitting upon his sofa, in his parlor, a quiet modest-looking man ; and I could not help thinking to myself, is that the fellow that sat sideways on Old Whitey at the battle of Buena Vista T " We are apt to look upon the title Rough and Ready' as one which was got up for the occasion. We are apt to imagine that a com mittee has been appointed lo draught resolu tions, and to present to the public such a name as will be taking. But that is not the case with a name like this. The highest glory of ancient knighthood was when the soldier was knighted by his sovereign on the field of bat tle. The highest title of a military man in a republic is when bis soldiers give a name that shall signify at once their confidence in bim and their appreciation of bis modesty. " He is called Rough and Ready' because in every rough situation he was ready; be cause he was found sleeping side by side with the common soldiery, with a tent or without a lent ; because he was found in the forefront of the battle, marked only by his venerable and his simple appearance. " Whigs of Massachusetts, 'ou owe a great deal to (Jen. Taylor. You have placed him in a situation of irreat responsibility. You have THEELECTIOrriNMARYLANDr i ' Ve adverted yesterday to the immense rejoicing in the Locofoco camp, ojij ac- ' count of their victory in Maryland ;. a vie- i tory achieved; without, the addition j of a i2 single partizan to ihcir own list, solely by . :Si the dereliction of the-AVhigs ! Wc risked- then, and we ask now, what does the? par- , ty propose to do, provided itMbtaih an . ; overwhelming majority in the House of Representatives? Does it intend to tbwartr every proposed measure,! no rhatter hov7 useful; to reject every scheme fo3P the pabl.eJ good, no matter how plausible ;'i to declare open war against every thing! that blayi .emanate from President Taylor, jno mat-i ter how consistent even with its own pre-T, viously expressed views upon tbesaroe subject? Docs it mean to imitate the foreign organ, and expressing at the cry outset, its determination to oppose the Ad ministration (right or wrong) to the bit ter end," act in strict conformity to this declaration throughout? Does it mean to take no account of any thing good that the Administration may do ? Is it pent only on putting it down, let its acts be what it may, and let the consequences to the country be what Actfmay ? Then we.' say, if this be so, never did any party in. this country undertake a task so Hercu lean, so little likrlyjo result in any bene fit to the country, so certain to crush! all those who are engaged in it. The people may be deceived for a while. They may mistake loud professions for real zeal in their cause. They may be led to tnink that he who talks the most of his country' is the readiest to sacrifice himself upon her altar. But in the cndr they always see things exactly as they are, and never fail to make the proper distinction! be tween faction and patriotism. 1 It is very apparent that nothing which Gen. Taylor can do, will ever satisfyl the party, which banded together for the bur pose of securing the spoils, knows no oth er motive. He cannot rebuke the inso lence of a Foreign Minister, an insolence which if it had been submiltted to, would have called down the unqualified denun ciation of the whole Locofoco press, with out hearing a hue and cry such as the Very press of the country which the Minister represents, would not have raised. Ho cannot latte steps 10 carry into etiecc one of the plainest provisions' of the law, that wntcn pronipits me maKing war upon a friendly power, without receiving the un qualified censure of these pretendeUj dis ciples of Jefferson of the man, who upon a mere suspicion that Aaron liurr intend ed to invade the territory of a friendly power, ordered his arrest, and had) bun tried for his life. He cannot take steps to prevent a ship of war from being trans ferred to a despot, to be used against (a feeble nation, with whom we have al ways preserved the most friendly relations without exciting a howl of rage from one end of the Continent to the other, through all the Democratic press. What will sat isfy such people? Nothing! Nothing 1 but a return to power, and the re-possession of the spoils. " If the Arch Angej Ga briel were President, he would notj suit them, unless they were allowed the privi lege of handling these, j If such be the disposition of the press, what are we to expect from a Congress composed of a majority of loco-foe os ?- Nothing of course but faction unadul terated, unqualified faction. Itis some&at isfaction to know, that the intelligence of the people will soon sift the chaff from the wheat will soon distinguish the truepat riot, from the rabid factionist will award to faction precisely the reward to which it is entitled, in the strictest spirit of im partial justice, j In the mean time upon the loco foco majority, will devolve the responsibility of defeating or sustaining the Wilmot Proviso, as applied to California ; and as there cannot be a doubt, judging.fromlthe Oregon case, of the manner in which this will be done, we congratulate the people of Maryland and North Carolina upon the vast wisdom by which their course in 'the late elections was directed. Rich. IVAig 1 ..A .ft I .ml, t m n . lvlMtfrk WtC llfAII . I - I .a 1 1 ( J I 'iucr.i jw tier,isce her ana ten ner nasie 10 u.ucij n new uiuv iuoc, vym- j jLiVeryining is swept ciean wnere irns witf-it-ij-teSi her: whatever you like, I ed her finger jwith a thorn ; it bled freely house stood ; it was entirely ; demolished, tateive! hpT tiita 'nurse and this cross. t and annlvinii the petals of a white? tose Mrs. Corson was found dead In the limbs 1 bat's a'U ?: t "'. , to the wound, she said, smiling : "l ap a Gf an old oak tree that was blown down 'Is that all. captain ?' second VenusL I have died the white) rose,! some 40 yards from the site of the house. 'I saidsd. Qood-byc ; and make haste reiir At that foment they 4UoVs I ildi.'t know bow it was. but I and fearing the other yo k'Wvvo iearsifrcezini? on mv cheeks?" had loitered behind, had met with anrac Itvvoctkrsifrcezing on my cheeks' VNoVCahtain,' cried 1. I won't leave tort yoti shall .come with me or I will fcywith jW ' Caplairi, ybu might just as well forbid f ornan tnlking. lescjtpcj Pll punish you severely.' '.Yoiiirrtjiv rlAr mi nnilpT arrest then. tjusy n6w,i you must Jet me do as I ever. I TouVoap Insolent fellow.' .Very lively captain, but you must come mS.V(,- :. ': Y " lHe tit his 1 ins with atisrer. but said no I Raised j b im and placed his body mv. Khnii Ir lilr n sar.K. Yon 'y'jy imagine that while bearing cS a burthen5 I could not move as quick rnyi comrades. Indeed I soon lost! of the Liberty wjlf.v heir colunins, and could perceive uf Wthe white silent plain around 2: 4 taoved tin. and nrnsnntlv tbprn r- Sfi r? antl of Cossacks galloping to- . mjt. IhAlii UniiAsat't ortl cl.., . I hcir fiendish war err. was by this time in a state l "corjsciousnesi; and I resolved, Ibtt W mig"i not lo abandon htm. nim ' a. !. i . l - .vii mu irrou u. cuvurcu mm w , cident, hastened back to assist her. The fair one's screjam had been called forth by no worse an accident than had befallen her companion. She had angrily thrfiwn away the offending flower, and tnjade so pertinacious and fretful a lamentation over her wounded fingers, and the yonth after a ljttle i reflection, resolved oh a speedy union vith the least handsomeJbut more amiable of the two young friends. Happy would! it be for many a kind heirt ed woman dioV see know by yhat seenjjing trifles the affection of those whom! jshe loves may be confirmed or alienated! for Colored Candidate. Among the mimes party of New York, we ob serve that of S. R. Ward, the colored! di vine, who is aj State. "1 Few moe Left.1 During the! first day of the agricultural fair at Rock.vjlle, Md., Smith the Razor Strop Man, fold 8204 worth dfi his razors, and on the Sec ond day $90 worth " more. Still, he Jhas "a few more left.'' iir: ; U - heard a Scream Riit littlf hnnps are entertained of tbe re OUng lady, I Wno rovprv nf her sister, whn was ternblv mil. .i -".v ' '-'J tilated. From this point it passed onward, car ryirig fences, trees, Scc, before it had a breadth of 40 yards, a quarter of a mile further, where it encountered a large two story house, in which were the widow of Daniel Young, her daughter and three others. The house met no better fate than those above mentioned, yet strange to say, the inmates received but slight in jury. j f At the end of another quarter of, a mile, it struck a large barn, and what it did not take off entirely, it scattered in every direction. From Jhis point it upset Nome small buildings, and threw others off the blocks, until it reached GreatEgg Harbor Bay.near Beesley's Point no doubt making a magnificent water ! spout in its passage over the water. A part of a roof was found on the point of Pecks beach, four miles from the s cene bf disaster, and a hat six miles oflt A scythe without a snatu, was carried tnree-iounns oi a roue. candidate for Secrejtay of n it i )Mr. Calhoun. The tmor that Mr. CalKoun meditates resigning bis seat in the .Senate of ine unuea oiaies, is pronounced oy iuo puuiu arpuna papers iu oc wiiuoui lounuauvu. ; looking warrior about forty years of age ! taen him from the position which he filled so With an open intelligent expression of nobly that of a soldier among soldiers and countenance, totally void of that wild you have called him to preside over the desti jook which so frequently characterizes nies of this country. He is now attacked very the inhabitant of the forest. His figure much as he was befi.re the battle of Buena is about the ordinary height, and well pro-! Vista. Nobody says a word against him. portioned with a pleasing deportment and nvery mniy utKiioieog; uia nuues, u mou. evincing much self-nossession in his man- i n.sjuagment ; out tney are trying, u they n i Ti 1 1 1 ners. His nead was envciopeu in a reu shawl, surmounted with white feathers, encircled with a silver band, with cres cents of the same metal suspended from his heck to which was appended a large silver medal, with a likeness of President Van Buren on its face ; his throat was thicklycovered with strands of large blue beads, he also wore bracelets of silver o- ver the sleeves of his decorated hunting shirt. A broad, showy bead belt passing Over his breast, suspended a beautifully beaded rifle pouch under his left arm, and possibly can, to get away as many as possible of his troops before he comes into action. They are trying to pick off the officers ; and upon what ijrounds do they pretend to pick them off At one time we are told that General Tay. lor is afraid to maintain (he dignity of bis coun try ; that be is really afraid. Because be thinks it wisest and best, as it was his duty to do, to prevent any armed interference with for. eign countries by citizens of this country; be cause he will not submit lo a fniluie of the pro per diplomatic decencies of the Cabinet we are told that he is afraid on the one band, and red leggings, with brass buttons, which 1 on tbe other that he is desirous of involving us were richly embroidered with beads where ! in war. they; covered the upper pHrt of the moc- j Fellow-citizens, it m our duty to stand by the casihs, completed the costume of the king man that we have put into lhat place. To be of the Seminoles. A sure we are not going to cast our votes for bun The amount of the "talkP was that the at this time, but we my assist him. The rote Indian nation was totally I opposed to a of Massachusetts has always been since the that Gen. Taylor and every mcmberjof THE INFAMOUS SHEET. Just about this time, the New Yprk Herald is a specialfavorite with the Lo cofoco prints. Whenever their own in ventive faculties are at fault to concoct a charge against the Administration of pe culiar baseness, they have resort to that kindred reservoir of all filth. " See," they exclaim, "what a Taylor paper says. Here is one of your own organs, which charges that M. Poussin was dismissed because the Cabinet would not associate with Madame P. It also charges that Mr. Clayton created the difficulty, to eha? ble bis friends to make money by specu lating in shocks. Of course, it must j bo true. A Taylor paper says so." . j It is such witnesses as this, that the Lo enfocos now bring forward to sustain their libels against the Administration an au thority deemed infamous by all men, even in New York. j . T The fact is, that the Administration has never taken the slightest notice of this vile sheet, since its accession to power. It has never given it an advertisement, nor condescended in any wise to acknow ledge its existence much less recognise it as worthy of the least consideration' of any honest or decent man. - For pursuing this course, we conceive war with the whites and would exert days of 177G, and I trust always will be of his Cabinet merit the warmest tbanks of of neace; gfeal weight in the United biates ot America. : A g0OX men of all parties. Rich. IV At-. themselveslo continue on terms that 'the depredations committed by a par ty of five young men, who j would be giv en up lo the General as ! soon as they Lcould be sent after to the Kissimce, where they were in custody, and the party could return; and as the whole country was cov- It is our duty to stand by the man whom we have placed in that elevated position. Whigs of Massachusetts, you are entrusted with a cer tain post in this warfare. You are entrusted with the defence of a citadel that has never surrendered, and it is your duty, as long as you have a leader like General Taylor, as long at eredjwitb water, this could not De done be g(ands firm and lruo to lne ,anner of Whig sooner than in thirty days, Dut at the end of that time he(theheadj chieQpledged himself they should be delivered up to the 5 .r'-j...i..i-Lj .l . General. , He acknowledgjed the extent of thjj outragesr which j he expressed Soloque, the black Emperor of Ha)ti, feat forwarded 633,000 to London to purchase a crown. Tbe Senate fixed hit salary at 8150,. 000, but subsequently added 850,000 for pia money" for the Empress. and honor.' case will be continued until next term. t i n , l t principles, to give your time and your talent, to Darren, cnargea w in oe.ng engag. sustaining bim, and, through bim, to sustain- ; ed m the d.ssem.nat.on of afKl,t,on documenti in. the r,?eat nrineinle. bv which this common- at Spartanburg, (b. C.) has been admitted lo ft.i x. s i. i!-- ..K lnrv ; bail in the sum of one thousand dollars. IJi nrauu uaj iiscu, Vkm ll uat w o J j ! 1 . I .' s - ' t ! 1 r ,".-5 7 -i.. :f r. i: ! - t. U

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