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Winston-Salem chronicle. (Winston-Salem, N.C.) 1974-current, June 04, 2015, Page A5, Image 5

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UNC-Chapel Hill building to drop name of prominent KKK leader BY EMERY P. DALESIO ASSOCIATED PRESS CHAPEL HILL - Trustees at the country's oldest public university decided Thursday, May 28, to rename a University of North Carolina classroom building so that it no longer carries the name of a 19th century Ku Klux Klan leader. The decision revers es one made in 1920 to honor William Saunders, a Confederate officer and politician credited with helping to preserve colonial records. But university trustees 95 years ago also praised Saunders for his post-Civil War leadership of the Klan, a violent white supremacist group that aimed to overthrow elected state governments and reverse rights granted to newly emancipated slaves. "This was the institu tion honoring someone for being the leader of a terror ist organization. That's just not going to fly," said Alston Gardner, one of the trustees who crafted the school's response to demands by student activists. Phillip Clay, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and former chancellor who is the trustee board's only black member, said he would have favored leaving the name and explaining Saunders' pros and cons. But he agreed a name change was needed after learning earlier campus trustees honored Saunders specifically for his leader ship of the Klan, which was even then illegal. Haywood Cochrane, one of three trustees to vote against renaming, said it's unwise to evaluate people of other times and places with strictly contemporary eyes. "The university's histo ry should be used to let it show us how far we've come, but also how far we need to go," Cochrane said. The building now hous ing the geography depart ment will be renamed Carolina HalJ. Trustees also adopted a 16-year morato rium against renaming other places on the campus that was chartered in 1789, making it the country's old est public university. Though it could be reversed by future trustees, the moratorium would seem to freeze in place the name of a dormitory named for former Gov. Charles Aycock, a white suprema cist who led the state from 1901-05. Duke University and East Carolina University have dropped Aycock's name from campus build ings in the past year and UNC Greensboro is con sidering renaming a 1,600 seat auditorium named for him. "There are a number of troublesome people in our history. But that's reality," Gardner said. "In the Saunders case, we felt it was very different than someone having objection able racist views." 1 II | can make a difference " W ^ B y| in the life of a child. Foster or Adopt Today! Become a resource parent for a child in need of a safe and loving home V I 1-800-632-1400 wwwxhsncorg s < Mkkrfft llnnjf So(tH> Children's Home Society is looking for loving adoptive and foster homes for the thousands of children in North Carolina who desperately need a family to call their own. Waiting children represent all ages and races and are in need of resource families due to abuse or neglect. Please consider opening your home to children older than 5, sibling groups, and children with special needs. Get a head start on your college courses this fall! College transfer and college prep courses are still available. . Registration is June 17. i ? www.ForsythTech.edu FORSYTH TECH 2100 Silas Creek Parkway 1 Winston-Salem, NC 336,723.0371 We're powering future rock stars. And those Tm-really-proud-of-her, but-that's-really-loud" moments. That's why we're investing in new, innovative technologies to keep our systems smarter, cleaner and always improving for today, and tomorrow. Because we know what we're delivering is more than just electricity. It's power - for your life. ?gs?. **?<""" Quick fact: We recently completed a decade-long, $9 billion program to modernize our power plants and retire almost 4,500 megawatts of older coal-fired units. Message paid for by Duke Energy shareholders.

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