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Winston-Salem chronicle. (Winston-Salem, N.C.) 1974-current, July 23, 2015, Page A4, Image 4

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OPINION The Chronicle 617 N. Liberty Street 336-722-8624 www.wschronicle.com >|2j Ernest H. Pitt Donna Rogers Elaine Pitt Publisher/Co-Founder Managing Editor Business Manager Our Mission ^ ?? i ?? The Chronicle is dedicated to serving the residents of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County by giving voice to the voiceless, speaking truth to power, standing for integrity and encouraging open communication and lively debate throughout the community. File Photo by Erin Mizellc for the Winston Salem Chronicle Salvation Army Center of Hope. Now what, as SalvationArmy withdraws its request? The Salvation Army of Winston-Salem has ended its quest to obtain re-zoning for the property at 939 Cleveland Avenue in order to renovate it and move its homeless shelter for families there. The organiza tion has decided to look elsewhere for a new home for the shelter. The Army's Center of Hope, which is on Trade Street, fueled heated debate among stakeholders in the Cleveland Avenue area of the East Ward. The Center of Hope already is in the East Ward, but not in the Cleveland Avenue area; not in the "backyard" of those who live in the Cleveland Avenue area and those who say they have that area's best interest at heart. On any given day at The Salvation Army's Center of Hope for homeless families, 50 percent of the res idents are children. The Salvation Army's goal is to quickly rehouse shelter residents into permanent housing and help them improve and stabilize income so that they can make an even greater positive impact on the commu nity. The arguments made against bringing The Salvation Army into the neighborhood were that the children need to see positive role models instead of what is there in the Cleveland Avenue area. Also, the anti-Salvation Army crowd said the residents of the Center for Hope would only add to the distress in the community. So the bickering ends and the status quo remains. The question is now what? The Salvation Army requests help from "the entire community, and our city leaders, to help us continue the search for the appropriate location for the continuance of this vital service with in our city." It is still seeking a place to relocate its shelter. The East/Northeast Winston Neighborhood Association and the Housing Authority of Winston Salem and others who shouted "NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard)" can lower their voices and remain in a neighborhood that has a lot of problems, including lack of economic development. They have a plan to implement, but no telling how long it will take for the plan to bring the desired results. And the owners of the property at 939 Cleveland Avenue, Greater Cleveland Christian Church, will have to find another buyer. Will the NIMBY effect keep the church from selling the property at all? The effort to re-zone 939 Cleveland Avenue from a day-care facility to a homeless shelter brought out some issues residents have. It showed that the resi dents, along with some City Council members, know how to stop entry into the Cleveland Avenue area. The question is, do they know how to bring the kind of businesses they want to the area? M BMGMS A UoMElKS ?L1 F3BWcW0|W1OCW1U)BEN IVHPOUR SfcAlli MR KM - ?> LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Thank you for the help in trying to gain East Winston building To the Editor: The Salvation Army of Winston Salem is announcing today [Friday, July 17] our decision to withdraw the re-zoning request for the property at 939 Cleveland Avenue. Our intent had been to provide a shelter for women, families and chil dren on this site. But after much deliberation and with a concern for what is in the best interest of the homeless families we serve as well as our mission of meeting^ of the shelter for women, families and children .Throughout this process, we have respectfully listened to the concerns of manyvoices in the Cleveland Avenue community. We agree with those who point out that the Cleveland Avenue com munity has been long overlooked, underserved and passed over in years past. However, we do not believe the presence of a shelter for some of the most vulnerable members of our community would be a detriment to the neighborhood or a deterrent to economic development in the com munity. Nevertheless, The Salvation Army will no longer seek to place a shelter on Cleveland Avenue. Nor will we place shelter residents in a context where they are seen as a detriment to progress. The goal and desire of The Salvation Army remains constant - to serve our homeless neighbors in a way that honors their humanity, pro vides resources for them in a season of uncertainty and transition, and enables us to fulfill our mission in a manner that is con sistent with our core values and vision. We extend a special word of thanks to the residents of East Winston who supported our efforts and who engaged in conversations with us to learn more and better understand this need.Our neigh bors who find themselves in a season of homelessness need the support of the entire Winston-Salem neighborhood. The Salvation Army is committed to the care, safety, and well-being of our neighbors and requests the assis tance of the entire community, and our city leaders, to help us continue the search for the appropriate loca tion for the continuance of this vital service with in our city. Thank you for your time, care and interest in this ministry. Major James Allison, Area Commander The Salvation Army of Winston-SaJem Keep supporting N.C. NAACP by going to trial To the Editor: A big THANK YOU to everyone who came out to support the N.C. NAACP and the Moral Monday Movement at the March and Rally for Voting Rights! The case is currently being heard at the federal courthouse downtown and is expected to last up to three weeks. An easy way to continue to show your support is by going to the actu al trial. Court starts at 9 a.m. and goes till roughly 5 p.m., but you j may come I and go as you please - ^fcdpf Here are some helpful things to remember: 1) NO electronics are permitted, and yes, that includes cell phones, so leave your devices at home or in your car. 2) You must have a photo ID to be able to get into the courtroom. 3) The H.B. 589 trial is being held on the second floor, which means you will have to pass through TWO security checkpoints - be pre pared to take off your belt, shoes, and anything else with metal. 4) We know tensions are high and fraught with emotion, but while you are in the courtroom, you must remain respectful and quiet (if you don't, the judge can have you removed or even hold you in con tempt of court). You really should go sometime in the upcoming weeks. Trust us - it's a true education! Forsyth County Democratic Party Historic Class of 1970 at Anderson High plans celebration To the Editor: Returning 45 years later .. The 1970 Anderson High class was the last class to graduate before busing was used to integrate the WS/FC Schools. The planning com mittee invites all the graduates and friends of that class to return to the Anderson Center on Aug. 1 to cele brate, reflect and appreciate the foundation of our molding years. We have a unique experience to share with each other and to be grateful for the experiences we shared as class mates and friends. That commir nity has primarily been absorbed by WSSU to continue educating future generations. Many of us attended pri mary, elementary and high school in that community formerly known as the Heights. Some of these students were togeth er for 12 years and have been life long friends. Many of these graduates have become responsible and productive citizens. All of these graduates have a unique story to share. Teachers, administrators and friends are invit ed to join us as we continue to share the good times we had at Anderson Jr. Sr. High School. Join the planning team of Greg Davis, Paulette Moore, Fleming J. El-Amin, Mable Millner, Patrice Scales, Linda Flynt, Wayne Ledbetter, Gloria Flynt, Denise Harris and Rudy Anderson as we return 45 years later to Anderson. Our meetings at Forsyth Seafood are about to materialize in a thundering celebration of the last class to gradu ate on Aug. 1 at the Anderson Center. Fleming El-Amin We Welcome Your Feedback Submit letters and guest columns to let ters? wschronicle.com before 5 pm. Friday for the next week's publication date. Letters intended for publication SfTffUld be addressed "Letters to the Editor" and include your name, address, phone number and email address. Please keep letters to 350 words or less. If you are writing a guest column, please include a photo of yourself, your name, address, phone number and email address. Please keep guest columns to 550 words or less. Letters and columns can also be mailed ? or dropped off at W-S Chronicle, 617 N. Liberty St., W-S, NC, 27101; or sent via our website, www.wschronicle.com. We reserve the right to edit any item submitted for clarity or brevity and determine when and whether material will be used. We welcome your comments at our website. Also, go to our Facebook ? page to comment. We are at facebook .com/WSChronicle. Send us a tweet on Twitter. We are at twitter.com/WS_Chronicle.

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