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North Carolina Newspapers

The daily Tar Heel. (Chapel Hill, N.C.) 1946-current, September 06, 1984, Page 16, Image 16

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8BThe Daily Tar Heel Thursday, September 6, 1 984 Favorites draw crowds 8 i i 5 I tat. By DEVI SEN Staff Writer The restaurants on Franklin Street have traditionally made Chapel Hill a unique place to dine. Not only are there a variety of places to dine, but there are also varied choices as to the menus. If you Ye looking for a quiet, atmosphere to go along with a simple, but elegant meal, then the Porthole is the place for you. Located on Old Fraternity Row, "The Porthole is unchanged. It's a family style restaurant of the '40s, Lena Marley, current manager, said. It opened for business in 1942, and, until this day, has remained inexpensive; an average person could spend only $4.32 for a full meal. Porthole's success is due partly to its house special, the garden salad. The restaurant remains open from 11: IS a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. The Carolina Inn offers a regal setting and surprisingly inexpensive prices. Owned and operated by the University, the Hill Room has been serving guests for over 56 years, and the cafeteria has been open for over a quarter of a century. Located on W. Cameron Avenue, Manager Gene Walton said the clientele, aside from the actual guests at the Inn, is usually limited to University personel and local families. There is a varied "nightly special" served at the Hill Room. The expensive atmosphere does not reflect in the prices. Breakfast prices do not exceed $3, and both lunch and dinner can each be bought for $5. I you're in the mood for an adventure, along with a low-priced, high quality meal then the Rathskeller is the restaurant. Running since 1948, the Rat provides the best iced tea in town, said Charles Smith, current manager and co-owner. Located at 157!5 E. Franklin St., the intricate passages of the Rathskeller draws a mixed clientele, consisting of both local families and UNC professionals as well as the campus students. The Rat has all ABC permits, and an average meal with liquor runs about $3.71 for both lunch and dinner. The Carolina Coffee Shop offers a combination of comfort and line dining. Opened by the Freeman family in 1957, this restaurant draws a mixed clientele, ranging from senior citizens to the UNC profession als to the students. Combining the back ground classical music with daily luncheon and dinner specials, "We are service oriented ... we strive for efficiency and courtesy," said Pam Patterson, manager. Located at 138 E. Franklin St., the Carolina Coffee Shop serves all three meals as well as late night supper. Prices range from $2 for breakfast to $5 for lunch to $7 for the evening meal. If, on the other hand, you're looking for a warm, sunny kitchen type atmosphere Ye Olde Waffle Shop is definitely the place to be. Managers Al Thomas and Jim Chris opened the shop 12 years ago, and are doing very well. Located at 173 E. Franklin St., the mixed clientele of students and business men enjoy the two house specials, Eggs Benedict and Big Bird. The Big Bird is a delicious omelet made with turkey, bacon and cheese sauce. The price runs aboutr $4.50. On the average, a meal could cost from $4 to $5. It is open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you're looking to dine at a family style restaurant with a comfortable atmosphere and a lot of background music go to Creadmen's. The Piscitello family started this restaurant 10 years ago, mainly attract ing the graduate students and local Chapel Hiilians. Located at 337 W. Rosemary St., Breadmen's success is due partly to its homemade onion rings. The restaurant has all ABC permits, and a full meal costs under four dollars. It remains open from 6 a.m. to midnight. If you're looking for a sophisticated dining atmosphere, go to Spanky's. This Chapel Hill restaurant was opened in 1977 by the Ewell Brothers and has since developed a reputation as a lively place to dine. Located at 101 E. Franklin St., Spanky's offers both a lunch, dinner and a late night menu. House specialties include the daily chicken special and the London Broil. The weekday clientele includes local businessmen and students. The weekends are usually booked with local families and couples. n 1 "1 0 J 7 ysfrsss-s. XCf ww w. .w vS- -...-y v. ..v.-.v.vs -v.-. ss:s. v.- ..ss.'-S.'; W-'. vw : r. VS. ""' .w.44frX44-'W v vy !2' VS.' ss.- S.StS.' - o -vyv ','4 - r "farHiS& ' , s ' '''' ' ' " . The Porthole on Old Fraternity Row Is a Carolina tradition. How to eat on a budget HENDERSON STREET .a: R (0) n pitchers every day HAPPY HOUR 3-7 Mon.-Fri. ALL DAY WEDNESDAY ; Open 1 1 am Mon.-Sat., 1 pm Sun. 108 Henderson St. 967-5201 L By MIKE ALTIERI StafT Writer Looking for a place to eat that doesn't eat a hole in your wallet? Chapel Hill has many such restaurants. K & W Cafeteria in University Mall is a family-style cafeteria that offers a buffet serving line. The selection of foods is extensive, including 10 or more entrees. These include roast beef, trout almondine and country-style steak. K & W also offers a wide variety of salads, including macaroni, carrot, jello and tossed salads. If you are still hungry, rolls and muffins are available, as well as dessert. Beyond the serving line this cafeteria provides large, open dining rooms with plenty of seating available. If you include all this with very reasonable prices, you have what K & W has been known for for a long time a filling meal at a decent price. K & W's hours are 11 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and 4-8 p.m. Monday thorugh Saturday, and 1 1 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday. If barbecue or all-you-can-eat specials are your favorite way to eat, then Sonny's is the place for you. Located on the 15-501 bypass near Kroger Plaza, Sonny's has been serving Chapel Hill for more than a year. Hickory-smoked beef, pork, chicken and ribs are Sonny's specialties, according to store manager Grover McNair. "Everything is fresh and cooked over open pits," McNair said. Sonny's offers an all-you-can-eat special every day of the week. For instance, Sunday's special is barbecued chicken, Tuesday's is ribs, and Friday is seafood. The average price for an all-you-can-eat meal is $6.99. Sonny's has other specials, such as a breakfast bar and soup and salad bar. Customers sit on wooden benches and dine under wagonwheel lighting. But you do not have to come in; Sonny's has a takeout and catering service. Sonny's is open 1 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. during the week, except for the breakfast bar. On weekends, Sonny's closes at 10 p.m. If you are in a hurry and have a taste for drive-in fast food, check out Snoopy 's at 1506 E. Franklin St. Footlong-hot dogs, deluxe cheeseburgers, onion rings, french fries, ice cream and hamburgers are the main menu items. Snoopy's offers a special of the day every day, featuring various combinations of foods at low prices. This drive-in also carries a complete breakfast menu, which is served 7-11 a.m. Outdoor seating is provided, or customers can eat in their cars. Snoopy's is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Chances are, even to students new to Chapel Hill, the name Roman Wings is familiar. Roman Wings has been delivering chicken wings to Chapel Hill residents for about two years. Last April the management opened the Roman Wings restaurant, which features basically the same menu as the one for the delivery service: chicken sings, chicken nuggers, spiral fries, cole slaw and celery sticks. Specialties include nachos, chicken fillets, corn dogs arid apple turnovers. The mainstay of Roman Wings, the wings themselves,range in price from $4 for 10 wings to $16.25 for 100. Orders come with a choice of cole slaw or celery sticks with blue cheese dressing, and hot bread. Roman Wings offers seven sauces for their wings, ranging from mild to extremely hot "erupter" sauces. A variety of beverages, including beer, is offered to help wash down those wings. A television adds to the atmosphere of this restaurant. Roman Wings is located at 401 W. Franklin St, beside the bus station. Those who dont want to travel off campus in search of food can dine at the newly renovated Lenoir Hall. Lenoir Hall is centrally located on campus, overlooking the fashionable Pit and facing UNC Student Stores. Anyone can eat in the dining room because it is suited to handle cash as well as meal cards. Lenoir Hall operates a full serving line for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Breakfast consists of anything from pancakes to French toast to eggs and bacon, as well as( milk, coffee and fruit juices. But getting your food may be a different story. Despite the renovation, serving lines are confusing, resulting in slow service and long lines. Franklin Center Downtown Chapel Hill 967-5400 Willow Creek Shopping Center Jones Ferry Road Carrboro 929-2288 Sun.-Thurs. 10:30 AM - 2:00 AM Fri.-Sat 10:30 AM - 3:00 AM Get 3h 5&iy!tmatioe

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