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The enterprise. volume (Williamston, N.C.) 1899-201?, June 18, 1940, Page 2, Image 2

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The Enterprise Published Every Tuesday and Friday by the ENTERPRISE PUBLISHING CO. WILLIAMS TON, NORTH CAROLINA. W. C. MANNING Editor ? SUBSCRIPTION RATES (Strictly Cash in Advance) IN MARTIN COUNTY One yaar ________________ $1.78 Six months . 100 \ OUTSIDE MARTIN COUNTY One year _ _ $3.28 Six months 1.25 No Subscription Received Under 6 Months Advertising Rate Card Furnished Upon Request Entered at the post office in Williamston, N. C , as second-class matter under the act of Con gress of March 3, 1879 Address all communications to The Enterprise and not individual members of the firm Tuetday . Jun, 1H. I'HO. The Hudfiel In Still II ith L? Possibly because the hides covering the most of us are now in danger, there has been a mai k ed slump in budget talk m this country. When it comes to defending ourselves against gun at tack, we do not mind raising the debt limit? to the sky if necessary?or increasing taxes. And it is agreed that it is far more inviting to live under a debt burden than under someone like unto one Adolf Hitler. But getting back to the budget. It has been maintained in the past and is maintained now. that the unbalancing of the budget in feeding the hungry and clothing the naked was just as necessary as the unbalancing of the budget today for national defense Certainly, large sums of money have been wasted in our relief programs. But watch vouc expenditures for defense, and you'll see the greatest waste of money and everything elsii_yy>u have ever seen. No one is to be censored, it just seems that our way of doing things invites waste. According to the records, the government had left over ness. an item that now finds its use limited to a few polo games now. The money spent for relief did more than re lieve the needy. That money has helped to place America in a position to defend itself, and it is reasonable to believe that this country will get more honest-to-goodness defense from every dollar spent for relief than it will get from ev ery dollar spent for actual weapons of war. We say this because today those who have received relief, with the exception of a small number of "fifth columnists" here and there and in the congressional halls, stand unified and ready to fight for their country Given a continuation of conditions as?they existed in the early thirties and if we had not blown up in the middle of a revolution we would be today extending a ready welcome to Hitler, Stalin or that yellow cur, Mussolini There's no doubt but what we and the gen erations to follow will have to pay the price of a top-heavy budget, but a nation unified in purpose can rise and fall together, suffer its sorrows and enjoy its joys together and still come out on top But a nation with one-half of its people wallowing in gracious plenty and the other half bogged down in poverty cannot hold together no matter "how tight the bonds, and no nation thusly divided can offer fight to Hitler or any other mad man who would at tempt to invade our shores and tear down the practical democracy practiced in this country since March, 1933. Today we can look back upon the relief ex penditures, the Tarm parity payments?rind other costs made and contracted during the past seven years as the cheapest money ever spent in building up a defense that will chal lenge Hitler and his combined force of yellow dogs in an attempt to step one foot on American soil. And in that group are those who would pledge their material holdings and even their lives to help keep Democracy as they have known it these past seven years from perishing from the earth. It is strange how the importance of ar? un balanced budget fades into the background un der certain conditions. But, sad to relate, there are a few who still talk in terms of an unbal anced budget. First it was the needy who are charged with upsetting the budget. Hunger and want did not make much of an impression, and a balanced budget was to be desired. Second, it was the war that gave the budget a real dose of jitters. These two things are far more import ant than the budget, and as long as they pres ent themselves we will do well to consider them before we consider the budget. Living In The Future The United States is already rated as a sec ondary nation because it is living in the future. It is well to look ahead, but if we are to enjoy liberty and freedom, we must certainly do ?one living in the pneawfc The experts tell us and each individual points out in unison, "We must protect our country by home production of strategic materials," "We must build more airplanes, more tanks, and we must expand our army, our navy." And that's the way it is?we must do this and we must do that. It oertamiy would be refreshing to know that some people are doing at least one of those things while the others are continuing to say, "We must do this and we must do that." It is just plumb disheartening to hear some one boast about what he can do, and then af ter it is too late to alter the course of events he goes ahead and does it. Isn't it possible for someone to do something now? When fi One Educated? Joseph Fort Newton, renowned clergyman, of Philadelphia, gives answer "When he can look out upon the universe, now lucid and lovely, now dark and terrible, with a sense of his own littleness in the great scheme of things, and yet have faith and cour age ? "Wheti he knows how to make friends and keep them, and above all. when he can keep friends with himself I "When he Inves lluwers, can hunt the. buds without a gun, and feel the stir of a forgotten joy in the laugh of a child. "When star-crowned-trees, and the glint of sunlight on flowing waters subdue him. "When he can be happy (done and high-mind ed amid the meaner drudgeries of life "When he can look into a wayside puddle, and in the face of the most forlorn mortal and see something beyond sin. "When he knows how to live, how to love, how to hope, how to pray?glad to live and not afraid to die, in his hand a sword for evil, in his heart a bit of song." American? All Washington Post. Yesterday's newspapers reported that the Italian and Italo-American residents of our large eastern cities had listened with deep gloom and foreboding to the fateful words transmitted to them from Rome. Much of their dismay, no doubt, was due to a realization of the rash and ignoble course to which the Italian fatherland had been commit ted by the will of its master. Much of it was due to fears for the fate of kindred and friends. But much of it must also have been due to an apprehension of their now uncomfortable sit uation among neighbors whose nerves and emo tions have been tortured by the cataclysmic succession of disasters in western Europe. News from England a few hours later tend ed to increase such fears. There had been an gry rioting in the Italian quarters of London, Liverpool, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and even Bel fast. Only?energetic action by police?saved harmless shopkeeper and restaurateurs from .injury and possibly death. Meanwhile, many prominent Americans of Italian birth or blood hastened publicly to re pudiate the Duce and to reavow the complete allegiance of their followers?to the United States. Among these were Representative D'Alesandro and Mayor LaGuardia. The mayor warned against demonstrations and promised to preserve the neutrality of tne sidewalks of New York. His radio speech contained much sound advice, despite the past occasions on which Mr. LaGuardia, himself, has not remem bered to follow it. We shall do well in this crisis to take the loy alty of our Italian-born citizens and their de scendants as much for granted as we expect our own to be taken. Nothing can be more dan gerous to the Nation than the fear-inspired fan tasies whereby an element of the population numbering many millions, and yesterday much admired for industry, sobriety, and good na ture, becomes today a gigantic horse of Troy. This applies also, of course, to that other large body of our citizens who are of German or Aus trian antecedents. This is a good time to chasten ourselves with the recollection of what incalculable tragedy was wrought upon innocent persons during the spy phobias oi some ZU years ago. II, ever we reach the point where anyone of German or Italian blood becomes, ipso facto, suspect, we shall have adopted the racial superstitions that we have so roundly and justly condemned in the Nazis. Moreover, we shall have created a confusion and disunity which the real "fifth column** will assuredly turn to its advantage. I (Juration Of Common Seme The State. So far as the attitude of the United States toward events in Europe is concerned, we do not agree with the views held by some ? that there is too much emotionalism and "hysteria" in -? . We think it's merely a question of common sense. It amounts to this: Do we want to live in a world that is dominated by German influences and German precepts, or don't we? The answer is?we don't. That being so, we believe that America should do everything within its power to help the cause of the Allies?short of sending our men overseas. We are heartily in accord with the proposed shipment of munitions and supplies, because in doing that, we are protecting our own interests and our own welfare. If this had been done some time ago, it would have been of greater benefit than now. But it isn't too late by any means, so let's put an end to our attitude of hypocricy and render the Allies the kind of service they need and which we are Justified in giving to them. "HIGH PRESSURE STUFF RESOLUTION A resolution concerning the death of Thomas Cleveland Allsbrooks, a Commissioner of the Town of Oak City. Whereas, it has been brought to the attention of the Town Board that Thomas Cleveland Allsbrooks. Commissioner of the Town of Oak City, died recently in the city of Tarboro, North Carolina; and Whereas, It is the desire of the Town Board, and Mayor, of Oak City, North Carolina, to give testi mony to the valuable service ren dered by the deceased; and Whereas, it is the will of the Town Board, and Mayor to express in Res olution and Act its sincere sympathy and regret in the untimely death of Thomas Cleveland Allsbrooks; Now. therefore. Be it resolved by the Town Board, and Mayor, concurring First, That the Town Board, and Mayor, of Oak City, North Carolina, in regular session on the tenth day of June, one thousand, nine hun dred and forty, extends to the wife of Thomas Cleveland Allsbrooks. in her sorrow and bereavement the sincere sympathy of the Town Board, and Mayor, in the passing of her husband, who was recognized as a leading spirit of the affairs of our Town. Second, That a copy of these Res olutions be sent to Mrs. Thomas Cleveland Allsbrooks, and to press for publication. Ratified this the 14fh day of June, A D.. 1940 N. W JOHNSON. Mayor twelve o'clock noon, in front of the courthouse door in the town of Wil liamston, N C., offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, to-wit: 26 acres of Catling land lying and being in Goose Nest Township, same being a 4-576 of 2648 acres of Catling land lying and being in Martin Coun ty. N. C.. and rAore particularly de scribed in a timber deed from Henry Johnson, and others, to Dill Cramer Truitt Corporation, of record in the public registry of Martin County in Book W-2, at page 12. This the 10th day of June, 1940. CHAS. H. MANNING. jll-4t Commissioner. RESOLUTION A resolution concerning the death_ of Benjamin M Worsley, Treasurer of the Town of Oak City Whereas, it has heen?brought In the attention of the Town Board that Benjamin M. Worsley, Treasurer of the Town of Oak City, died recently in the city of Rocky Mount, North Carolina; and Whereas, the said Benjamin M. Worsley, was the Treasurer of the Town of Oak City; and Whereas, hy reason of liis long service to the Town, and his life and character, that the Town Board, and Mayor, desires to express their appreciation of him, and deepest sympathy for his family; Now, there fore, Be it resolved by the Town Board, and Mayor,' concurring: First, That in the death of Ben jamin M Worsley, Treasurer of the Town of Oak City, the Town has lost a valuable public servant, re membering his wisdom and activity as a member of the Governing Board of Oak City, and his untiring effort in his long service, as Treasurer; a fearless, industrious and untiring public servant, a friend to the needy, and a patriot. Second. That the Town Board and Mayor, extend their deepest sympa thy to the widow and family of the deceased, and that a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the fam ily, and be given to the press for publication. Ratified this the 14th day of June, A. D., 1940. N W. JOHNSON, Mayor NOTICE OF SALE North Carolina, Martin County. In The Superior Court. Ceunty of Martin vs. II. S. Pearsall Under and by virtue of an order of sale and judgment in the above en titled proceeding made by L. B. Wynne. Clerk of the Superior Court of Martin County, on Monday, the 10th day of June, 1940, the under signed commissioner will, on Wed nesday, the 10th day of July, 1940, at twelve o'clock noon, in front of the courthouse door in the town of Wil liamston, N. C., offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, to-wit: 60 acres of the Catling land lying and being in Goose Nest Township, same being a 15-576 of 2648 acres of Catling land lying and being in Mar tin County, N. C, and more particu larly described in a timber deed from Henry Johnson and others to Dill Cramer Truitt Corporation, of rec ord in the public registry of Martin County in Book W-2, at page 12. This the 10th day of June, 1940. CHAS. H. MANNING, ill-4t Commissioner. NOTICE OF SAMS North Carolina. Martin County In "Bib Superiui Court. County of Martin vs. Mrs. A. B. Cole man and Others. Under and by virtue of ail order of sale and judgment in the above en titled proceeding made by L. B. Wynne, Clerk of the Superior Court of Martin County, on Monday, the 10th day of June, 1040, the under signed commissioner will, on Wed nesday, the 10th day of July. 1940, at DK. V. H. MEWBOKN OP-TOM-E TRI8T Please Note Data Changes Robersonville office, Scott's Jew elry Store, Tuesday. June 18. esfiii' -* rri n.. ..iw?? ?i _ wiinamston orrice, reeie i jiwei ry Store, every Wed., B a. m. to 1 p. m Plymouth office, Liverman's Drug Store, Every Friday, 10 ajn. to 4 p.m. Eyas Era mined Glasses Fitted Tarboro Every Saturday. NOTICE OF SALE North Carolina, Martin County. In The Superior Court. County of Martin vs. Thomas E. Price and Others. Under and by virtue of an order of sale and judgment in the above en titled proceeding made by L. B. Wynne, Clerk of the Superior Court of Martin County, on Monday, the 10th day of June. 1940, the under signed commissioner will, on Wed nesday, the 10th day of July, 1940, at twelve o'clock noon, in front of the courthouse door in the town of Wil liamston, N. C.. offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, to-wit: 52 acres of Gatling land lying and being in Goose Nest Township, same being a 12-576 of 2648 acres of Gat ling 1 and..lying and, being in Martin County, N. C . and more particularly described tfi a timber deed from Hen ry Johnson and others to Dill Cram er Truitt Corporation, of record in the public registry of Martin County in Book W-2. at page 12. This the 10th day of June, 1940. CHAS H MANNING, j 11 -4t Commissioner. NOTICE OF SALE North Carolina, Martin County. In The Superior Court County of Martin vs. Mamie Price Pouncey and Others. Under and by virtue of an order of sale and judgment in the above en titled proceeding made by L. B. Wynne, Clerk of the Superior Court of Martin County, on Monday, the 10th day of June, 1940, the under signed commissioner will, on Wed nesday, the IQth day of July, 1040, at twelve o'clock noon, in front of the courthouse door in the town of Wil liamston, N. C. offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, to-wit: 26 acres of Gatling land lying and being in Goose Nest Township, same being a 4-676 of J648 acres of Gatling land lying and being in Martin Coun ty, N. C-, and more particularly de scribed in a timber deed from Hen ry Johnson and otheaa to Dill Cramer Truiit Corporation, at record in the public registry of Martin County in Book W-2, at page 12. This the 10th day of June. 1M0 CHAS. H. MANNING, j 11 -4t Commissioner. being in Goose Nest Township, same being a 1&-678 of MM acres of Og ling land lying and being in Martin County, N C , and more particularly described in a Umber deed trosa Hen ry Johnson and others to Dill Cram er Truitt Corporation of record in the public registry of Martin Coun ty in Book W-2, at page 12. This the 10th day or June, 1?40 CHAS. H. MANNING, 111 -4t Commissioner. NOTICE OF SALE North Carolina, Martin County, In The Superior Court County at Martin vs. Mis Leuiae Pearmll. Under and by virtue of an order of sale and judgment in the above en titled proceeding made by L. B. Wynne, Clerk of the Superior Court of Martin County, on Monday, the 10th day of June, 1040. the under signed commissioner will, on Wed nesday, the 10th day of July. 1940, at twelve o'clock noon, in front of the courthouse door in the town of Wil Uamston, N. C., offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, to-wit: 56 acres of Gatling land lying and ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE Having qualified as Administrator of the Estate of Mrs. Delia Clark, de ceased. late of Martin County. North Carolina, this is to notify all peraons having claims against the Estate of said deceased to exhibit them to the undersigned at his home. R.F.D., Williamston. North Carolina, on or before the 7th day of June, 1941, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said Estate will please make im mediate payment This the 7th day of June, 1940. ROY CLARK, Administrator of Mrs. Delia Clark. Hugh G. Horton and J. C Smith, Attys. jll-gt Lemon Juice Recipe Checks Rheumatic Pain Quickly If you suftcr from rheumatic, arthritis or neuritis pain, try this simple inexpen sive home . recipe that thousands ate using. Get a package of Ru-Ex Compound today. Mix it with a quart of water, add the juice of 4 lemons It's easy. No trouble -+* aW and pleasant. Vero need?only 1~ taHc-qroonfuls two times a day. Often within 48 hours ? sometimes overnight ? splendid result* arc obtained. If the pains do not quickly leave and if you do not fed better. Ru-F-x will cost you nothing to Try as it is sold by^ your druggist under an absolute money-back guarantee. Ru-Ex Compound is for sale and recommended by DAVIS PHARMACY Pause...at the familiar <\ red cooler for the pure refreshment OF ICE-COLO COCA-COLA n: oca-cola both.inc. co. GREENVILLE, N. C. CALM SAILING . . . AHEAD . . . 'pHE old seafarer gases with keen, trained eyes, at sky and spaee and plana the course of his voyage. So, too, must every man plan the course of his financial life, by in tently considering his income, his necessary expenditures, and his goal for Independence. Save regularly?' and y ou will live oomfortably I Branch Banking & Trust Co. WILUAMSTON, N. C. Member Fed end Deposit Insurance Corporation VISIT ROANOKE ISLAND THIS SUMMER ? See the Symphonic Pageant Drama of America's Beginning ? This Year in Its Fourth Season! "The Lost Colony" ON THE STAGE OF THE Waterside Theatre ?AT? FORT RALEIGH HISTORIC ROANOKE ISLAND, Mantro, Dare County, North Carolina Written by the noted playwright, Paul Green, and produced by native* at Dare County, to whom the story of "The Goat Colony" la their hiatory and their daily Uvea, aided by member* of the Playmak era from the Unlverulty of North COro thia outdoor* preaentation of "The imp Loet Colony" la ao impreaatve that thoa* who aaa It never forgot It* beauty, ita patriotism, and ita religious InepiraUoa. THE TAJLT ADVANCE. cmr, n. c * i ONjr Lot Colony Performance* Thursday, Friday, day Dlfkl. r IS o'clock JUNE 29th through SEPT. 2nd Viait the Scenic North Corolinm Wright Memorial, on I WUbur i " ? npU . \ at l at tlM aouada, and ^pjdng white waww_ Um old Atlantic. This la juat ?I ?

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