Skip to Content
North Carolina Newspapers

The Roanoke beacon. (Plymouth, N.C.) 1889-1929, November 17, 1916, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

-mm in V 1.00 a Year In Advance -FOR GOD, FOR COUNTRY AND FOR TRUTH." ' SIngJa Ooplee. 8 Canta. VOL. XXVII. m PLYMOUTH, N. 0.,'FEIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1916. NO20 W i -1 IV- ! I'ill ID SUPPORT OF UN AND 100SE VOTE Western Progressives Turned To Him Almost En Masse But Not Those of East PEACE IS POWEREUL ISSUE WITH THE WOMEN MOOSE AFRAID OF HUGHES. HYPHEN SHOT TO PIECES. LABOR VOTE DIVIDED. NEW HAMPSHIRE WILSON'S Leads New England State by 63 Votes. Gains in California with 17 Precincts Missing. Hughes .Drops In .Minnesota, but Still Maintains Safe Lead. Wilson is a majority President. New York. On the returns up to date President Wilson has received 8,508,085 votes and Mr. Hughes 3,090, 951. Mr. Wilson's popular plurality ia therefore 417,134. He is a majority president, which he was not when he went into office. In 1912 he received 6,293,419 votes. It has been said that Mr. Hughes re ceived the votes of the most populous states of the Union and Mr. Wilson that of the less populou. There is not bo mucch difference as might be ex pected. The states which voted for Mr. Hughes had, according to tne last census, 45,901,739 inhabitants. Those which voted for Mr. Wilson had 45, 737,643. The difference in Mr. Hughes' favor is 164,096. The latest returns from the close states show the following results: In California Wilson is leading by 3,431 votes, with a few scattering pre cincts missing; in Minnesota, where some of the militiamen's votes have been counted, Hughes is still ahead by 286 votes with 27 districts missing; in North Dakota, with 14 districts mise ing. Wilson leads by 963 votes; New Hampshire, where the count has been completed, gives Wilson a plurality of 63 votes. From the reports of leading corre spondents in the different states on the influences which brought about Mr. Wilson's election it is possible to get a clear idea of the part played by the different group "votes" of which so much was said before election, and of the reasons whjich moved great bodies of voters to 'the decision they reached. Progressives and the Women. Two classes of voters, and two only, accomplished the result. They were not tne Gerrman-Amerlcans, the labor vote, or any of the groups standing for special interests. They were the Pro gressives and the women. The split made in the Republican partv in 1910, which became a break In 1912, was not mended at Chicago. The dispatches now in the hand3 of the papers indicate no probability of Its being mended until the cause for it Is taken away. From the Hudson River to the Mississippi, the bolters of 1912 were largely satisfied with Hughes, but to the East and West of those boundaries, especially to the West, they were not. Arid it was the West that decided the election. In New York and Illinois the breach was apparently healed; there Is no sign of anything to the contrary, and the same thing seems true of tfce states that generally follow the leader ship of these two. That, however, was as far as Colonel Roosevelt was able to bring about a reunion. The Progressives of Kansas, Wash ington, California and the other West ern States have again defeated a Re cause the other wing of the party was In control and made the nomination. Minnesota and Wisconsin voted for Hughes, but both have show that they are as progressive as ever, Minnesota W accenting him so narrowly and Wisconsin by LaFollette's victory, w - mtMk&& cWx Hi W l ' VvV i I III & fefeir w r X r - Popular Vote and Pluralities Vote Wilson. ' 82,439 10.324 68,833 283,436 114,223 74,561 22,631 36,417 93,171 33,921 405,048 231,890 185,325 143,670 219,584 60,966 51,113 112,674 173,408 150,751 106,426 57,114 330,746 27,941 109,008 7,968 34,724 178,289 20,437 455,573 144,507 29,535 423,152 119,156 47.064 395,619 30,142 48,355 48,942 130,335 221,539 36,579 15,350 90,332 86,840 113,197 164,409 15,310 9,970. 45,970. 287,524. 130,692. 102,453. 24,884. in 1912. Rep.-Prog. States. 32,420. .Alabama . . .Arizona ... .Arkansas . .California ; Colorado . . Connecticut . Delaware . 8,814., Florida ... 27,200. .Georgia ... 58,337. .Idaho .... 640,091.. Illinois ... 313,274.. Indiana ... 281,624.. Iowa , 194,967. .Kansas ... 218,278. .Kentucky . 13,157. .Louisiana . 75,038.. Maine 112,742.. Maryland . .Massachusetts. . . .Michigan ....... Minnesota .Mississippi .Missouri .Montana ........ .Nebraska .Nevada .New Hampshire.. .New Jersey .New Mexico .New York North Carolina... North Dakota. ... Ohio . Oklahoma 298,176. 366,823. 190,190. 5,138., 332,192. 40,968. , 126,905. 8,816. 50,721.. 234,245.. 26,080. 845,580. 98,269.. 48.816., 506,393 90,786. .Oregon , .Pennsylvania. . . . .Rhode Island. . . . .South Carolina.. . South Dakota . . . .Tennessee .Texas .Utah Vermont .Virginia 72,273. 720,731. 44,581. 1,829. 58.811. 113,169. 55,608. 66,274. 45,375.. 45.065. 184,143. .Washington .... 135,866. .West Virginia... 189,539. .Wisconsin 23,792. .Wyoming Votes Wilson.. 87,396 29,641 96,110 . 466,106 170,295 99,687 25,255 . 60,000' . 110.000 70,000 869,152 . 333,588 170,071 , 315,780 , 189,348 , 68,000 . 64,027 , 134,216 247.753 231,161 178.548 , 91,000 , 372,841 87,124 118,423 12,448 43,767 200,853 31,874 766,710 158.000 54,279 578,000 140,000 113,688 510,747 39,353 63,000 45,449 133,647 230,000 81,850 23,100 60,107 200.000 118,332 180,465 27.617 in 1916 Hughes. 2G.250 19,363 46,347 462.823 96,852 106,378 . 26,634 12,000 28,000 55,000 1,044,608 340,882 219,817 278,152 162,333 9,000 69,660 113,695 268,138 302,488 178,803 5,000 345,415 59.788 90,743 9,842 43,724 262,080 28,880 876,172 110,000 53,154 496,720 110,000 124,526 695,734 44,159 1,500 50,892 97,553 75,000 52,925 39,600' 21,132 185,000 120,359 204,418 19,998 Pluralities. Wilson. Hughes 61,146 10,278 49,763 3,278 73,443 43,000 82,000 15,000 37,628 27,015 59,000 20,521 86,000 27,426 27,336 27,575 2,606 63 2,994 48,000 1,125 81.280 30,000 66,500 41.094 155,000 28,925 33,975 15,000 7,619 6,691 1,379 175,456 7,294 49,746 5,633 20,385 71,327 260 61,277 109,456 10,838 184,987 4,806 5,443 16,500 1,027 23,953 6,293.117 7.604,594.. Totals 8,503,728 8,091,547 1,173,590 756,418 Popular plurality for President Wilson on present returns, 417,172. Gain over popular vote in 1912, on present returns, 1,215,726. Note All the returns shown In this table, with the exception of those from New Hampshiro are unofficial and, with the exception of returns from New Jersey, Oregon, and Vermont, incomplete. Here is a list showing miss ing votes in some state where a number of districts rot heard from have been specified: Arkansas, 531 out of 1,765; Colorado, 109 out of 1,451; Iowa 487 out of 2,297; Kansas, 230 out of 2,443; Maine, four small precincts miss ing; Michigan, 275 out of 2",260; Minnesota, approximately, 2,500 votes, in cluding border votes, to be heard from; Missouri, 140 voting precincts missing; New Mexico, 40 out of 638 missing; Washington, 283 out of 2,385; West Virginia, 12 precincts missing. WOMEN A GREAT FACTOR. Helped Wilson Win the West Hold to Parties in Illinois. In the greatest of the suffrage states, Illinois, the women divided on the same lines as the men and roted about the same. "The result," says. a Chicago corre spondent, "was to swell the vote of the state without changing the result, except In sporadic cases, where purely local affairs were at stake." The Republicans in Illinois appealed to the women in opposition to the slo gan. "He kept us out of war," by bring ing in women to give personal experi ences in Mexico and in Europe and to tell of their vain appeals for protection under the American flag. If "He kept us out of war" had any effect on the Illinois women, this move offset it. In many of the downstate counties the election officials did not separate the vote of the men and women. Where the distinction was made, the down state totals were: Wilson, men, 232.592; women. 142,470; Hughes, men, 275,968; women, 187,806. This portion of the vote gave Hughes a plurality of 43,367 on the men's vote, and 45,336 on the women's. "He kept us out of war," seems to have had no influence on the women of Illinois, but on the other hand they did not rise to the. argument of the suffrage leaders, who wanted them to make suffrage the sole issue; there is too little difference between their vote and the men's forf any such thing to have happened. In Montana, as in Illinois, the women I appeared to be actuated by the same j wishes and motives a the men. EP S E OF HOUSE CONTROL WILL HAVE A MAJORITY OF ONLY SEVEN MEMBERS OVER THE DEMOCRATS. THREE DISTRICTS IN DOUBT Votes of Membfrs of Minor Parties Which Have a Total of Nine Votes, Might Prevent Election of Speaker Mann. ? . Washington. Returns from all ex cept three of the 435 Congressional districts in the country make it clear that the Republicans will have a majority of at least seven over the Democrats in the next House of Rep resentatives. Granting victories to the Democratip candidates in all three doubtful dis tricts, the Republicans will still main tain a majority over their major party opponents. If the Democrats should capture the three doubtful districts, and the five members who have been elected by independent movements or minor parties should join with them, combined-opposition would have a ma jority of one over the Republicans. But one of the minor party candi dates will join the Republicans, and it is assured that two others will vote generally with that party. This means that Republicans will be able to elect their candlate speak er, organize the House and control the committees. The Republicans may gain one and perhaps two of the doubt ful districts. The third doubtful dis trict is likely to go to the Democrats. The line-up of the House of Repre sentatives in .the next, or Sixty -fifth Congress as far as shown by returns to date, will be as follows: Republicans 217 Democrats 210 Prohibtionist who will act gener ally with the Democrats 1 Socialist, who will act generally with the. Democrats 1 Independent, who will attend the Republican caucus 1 Protectionist, who will attend the Republican caucus 1 Progressive, who will act gener ally with the Republicans.... 1 Doubtful (one In New Mexico and two in Pennsylvania) 3 Total membership 435 ELECTORAL VOTE. Wilson Hughes Alabama 12 Arizona 3 Arkansas 9 California 13 Colorada 6 Connecticut Delaware Florida 6 Georgia ' 14 Idaho 4 Illinois Indiana .. Iowa Kansas 10 Kentucky 13 Louisiana 10 Maine Maryland 8 Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota ............ .. Mississippi 10 Missouri 18 Montana 4 Nebraska 8 Nevada 3 New Hampshire 4 New Jersey New Mexico 3 New York North Carolina 12 North Dakota 5 Ohio 24 Oklahoma 10 Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina 9 South Dakota Tennessee 12 Texas 20 Utah 4 Vermont .. Virginia 12 Washington 7 West Virginia Wisconsin - Wyoming 3 14 45 Total 276 POPULATION OF WILSON HUGHES STATES 255 AND LINE UP OF THE NEXT HOUSE State Rep. Alabama Arizona Arkansas California 6 Colorado 1 Connecticut 4 Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho 2 Illinois J... 21 Indiana 9 Iowa 11 Kansas 3 Kentucky 2 Louisiana Maine 4 Massachusetts . 11 Maryland 2 Michigan 12 Minnesota 8 Mississippi Missouri 2 Montana 1 Nebraska 3 New Hampshire.. 2 Nevada 1 New Jersey 10 New Mexico New York 26 North Carolina . . North Dakota 3 Ohio 9 Oklahoma 2 Oregon 3 Pennsylvania .... 29 Rhode Island 2 South Carolina .. .. South Dakota 2 Tennessee 2 Texas Utah Vermont 1 Virginia 1 Washington 4 West Virginia .... 4 Wisconsin 11 Wyoming 1 Dem. Others. 10 . . 1 7 4 1 3 1 .. 1 4 12 6 4 5 9 7 4 4 1 1 8 14 1 3 16 9 13 6 5 1 7 1 S 13 2 f 1 1 Total... . 216 210 9 Doubtful North Carolina, 1; New Mexico, 1; Pennsylvania, 2. Total, 4. Progressive. Indepsndent. Socialist. Total membership, 435. States. Wilson. Alabama 2,138,093 Arizona 204,354 Arkansas 1,574,449 California 2,377,549 Colorado 799,024 Connecticut Delaware Florida 751,130 Georgia 2,609.121 Idaho 325,594 Illinois Indiana Iowa Kanlas 1,690,949 Kentucky 2,289,906 Louisiana 1,656,383 Maine Maryland 1,295,346 Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi 1.797.114 Missouri 3,293,335 Montana 376,053 Nebraska 1,192,214 Nevada 71,875 New Hampshire.. 430,572 New Jersey New Mexico 327,301 New York North Carolina.. 2.206.287 North Dakota... 577,056 Ohio 4,767,121 Oklahoma 1,657.155 Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Capolina .. 1,515,400 South Dakota Tennesse 2,184,789 Texas 3,896,542 Utah 373,351 Vermont Virginia 2,061,612 Washington 1,141,990 West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming 145,965 Hughes 1,114,756 202.322 5,633,591 2,700,876 2,224,771 742,371 3,366,416 2,810.173 2,075,708 2,537,167 9,113,279 542,610 7,665,111 542,610 583,883 355,956 1,221.119 2,333,860 Total . , .45,737,643 45,901,739 Wilson Led His Ticket. Wilson. Governor How States. Arkansas Colorado Delaware Florida . Idaho ... Illinois . Indiana 333.583 Iowa 170.071 Kansas Maine 96,110 158.257 23,255 60,000 70,000 869.152 315,780 64,027 Michigan 231.161 Massachusetts Montana , Nebraska 118,428 New Jorsey 200,853 New Mexico . , New York North Dakota Phode Island.., 247,763 87,124 31.874 706.716 54.270 39.353 Tennessee 13847 Texas ...... Utah Vermont . . Washington 230.000 81.850 23,100 93,562 145,156 23,987 31,250 60,500 521,207 324.3 143,843 198.000 67.219 192,825 230,102 75.931 117,839 165,605 27.065 697,007 19,458 25,384 131,974 200,000 77,465 15,212 .160,587 NATIONWIDE HAIL R. STRIKE NEW DANGER UNITED STATES 19 AGAIN FACING PROBLEMS WITH RAILROAD MEN. CAN NOT REACH AGREEMENT Application of Eight-Hour Law Still Unsolved After Important Confer ence. See Different Meaning of Provisions. Washington. Danger of a nation wide railroad strike, which was be lieved to have been averted by the passage of the Adamsou eight-hour law, has not entirely disappeared, it developed here when representatives of the railroads and the four brother hoods, comprising 400,000 employes, failed to reach an agreement as to the proper application of the new law. The stumbling block, both sides ad mitted, was the existing mileage sys tem of compensation. The announcement of the latest deadlock between the railroads and their employes came at the conclus ion of an all-day conference between the national conference committee of the railways and the brotherhood chiefs, which had been arranged in September. "We met," said Elisha Lee, chair man of the railroad managers and the conference, "for the purpose of exchanging ideas on the application and operation of the Adamson law. We failed to reach an agreement and we are not certain that another meet ing will take place." William G. Lee, presided of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, spokesmen for the employes in the absence of A. B. Garretson, of the Order of Railway Conductors, declar ed in a statement that in the event of evasion by the railroads"" of ' the Adamson law, summary action would be taken by the brotherhoods. He said that the strike order which was directly responsible for the law, was still in effect and the brotherhoods would not hesitate to enforce it if the occasion warranted it. "The brotherhoods asked for this conference," said Mr. Lee. "At the morning session we discussed the ap plication of the law and found that there was no basis upon which we could possibly agree. Another set back, besides the elimination of the mileage system, was the deteermina tion of the railroads to continue their suits to determine the constitution ality of the law." PRESIDENT IS BUSY AGAIN IN USUAL WAY. Asks With Much Concern About Com plexion of Next House. Washington. President Wilson was back at his desk in the White House, after an absence of 2 months, pre pared to take up important foreign problems which have been held in abeyance pending the election as well as domestic questions. These in cluded the German submarine ques tion, the Mexican problem and a num ber of Federal appointments. The President was expected to con sider first the submarine situation which is admittedly serious. A sum mary of recent developments in Ger man submarine warfare, prepared by the state department, was ready to be laid before him and, in addition, he prrobably soon 'will confer again with Ambassador Gerard on the situation. The President has not even consid ered the question of changes in his cabinet, according to Administration officials, who characterize as prema ture reports that he had decided on such changes. It is possible, how ever, that one or two cabinet officers may not remain after March 4. The President asked first for the latest Information on the political make-up of the House of Representa tives in the sixty-fifth Congress. He was told indications from present re turns were that the Republicans would have 217 members and the Dem ocrats 212 with six members of other parties. 'WON'T DISCUSS 1920" MR. ROOSEVELT SAYS. w esi, Virginia j cc j - S Wisconsin. , ld efficient repuk Oyster Bay. Aroused by the politi cal significance attached by various politkars and newspapers to the visit of George W. Perkins to Sagamore Hill, Colonel Roosevelt expressed him self definitely in regard to that 1920 sentiment. "I want it clearly understood," he said, "that no amount of visits or talk can induce me to speak of the 1920 nominations. I won't discuss pipe dreams." P. PINKHA&. V,,

North Carolina Newspapers is powered by Chronam.

Digital North Carolina