North Carolina Newspapers

    W:—
BADIN BULLETIN
VOL. I
APRIL, 1919
No. 7
OUR HONOR ROLL
Our boys are being rapidly discharged from the military service of our country, and are returning to take their places
the equally important fields of the trades, industries, and professions. So we present herewith a new Honor Roll, which
hope our readers will help us to make and keep correct and complete. It is the roll of former soldiers who are now
®*nployed in Badin, both by the Tallassee Power Company and by other businesses.
We keep the first place, however, for our honored dead.
GOLD STARS ON OUR SERVICE FLAG
EDWARD L. SLEDGE
ROBERT FLEMING
WILLIAM SHANKLE
THOMAS LLEWELLYN
C. M
r',B-
^'’'kwelder, F
■■xiford. c. J.
“'hanan, c
C J- R.
J. M.
EMPLOYED BY THE TALLASSEE POWER COMPANY:
F. B.
Davis, Henry
Davis, W. H.
Dermid, J. F.
Dick, J. C.
DuBose, McN.
Efird, Clyde
Frazier, Walter
Friar, R. T.
Giersch, R. P.
Gill, J. H.
Greene, J. P.
Hardon, Norman
Haughton, Thos. H,
Helms, W. T.
Henderson, Jas. R.
Hix, Harlo
Humbarrier, Irvin
Hyatt, F. H.
Ivey, Hazel
Johnson, Archie
Jones, Coit
Kendall, J. S.
King, C. R.
Leonard. Joe
Lilly, W. T.
McCall, B. F.
MacGehee, Virgil
Mallory, Guy
Milton, C. Y.
Mitchell
Moose, B. N.
Morgan, Val.
Morris, Lacy
Nelson, Roy
Newkirk, Nelson
Robinson, Z. B.
Scarboro, John
Small
Thompson, H. B.
Vann, James
pu Weatherspoon, C. B. Williams, P. L.
HARMACY; Ear! Ferree PAUL REINER: Robt, Elwanger
badin SUPPLY COMPANY: Marvin Snuggi
Wimberly, Claude
SANITARY PRESSING CLUB: Jno. Herring
THE HIX COMPANY: Harlo Hix
OF GENERAL INTEREST
Th*** Housing Problem
industry, progress in
social con-
United States for the next
the’*'^^ y_®ars will, for the most part,
dectly 0 '*"• or necessity, either di-
an outgrowth of the
|>«en J. our country, the war has
*>as c of many things—
transportation prob-
'^^''ced Q “*’1 sea, and has ad-
problem at least a
^'''y possibly more.
years have we
I’^’^^tion ® ®®*'‘ousness of the housing
p is confronting every
*l*Pposed ^'^‘ously, the difficulty was
of '*'terest only cities of the
.®*Phia, York, Chicago, and Phila-
, *'®tion ,1, ’*'®P®ction and careful con-
^itv practically every
most small towns have
to only to
Or u ®»iall of the cities, but
of ’ unsanitary huts
small town.
What is bad housing? Any condition
of housing that is unsafe or unsanitary,
which tends to impair the phj'sical or
moral health of the tenant, or which has
a degrading effect on the community,
is bad housing.
Such conditions are found in the ex
pensive but unsanitary flat as well as
in the slums. It is accentuated, however,
in the districts inhabited by the poorer
classes; and the most common evil is
the lack of water, drainage, and sewer
age. Too often there is no pure water,
the supply being obtained from cisterns
or wells contaminated by soapsuds and
dishwater, which form a scum on the
ground, and seep thru the soil into the
well. There is the further menace of
the open vault and cesspools, ashes,
garbage, and rubbish, which fill the air
of the neighborhood with stifling odors,
and spread contagion by swarms of flies.
The inaccessibility of a sufficient sup
ply of water tends to discourage a wo
man who is inclined to keep her house
cican and neat. In the case of the
(Continued on p«|* •)
One or Two Aprils Ago
April, 1916—Plantsitc—Carbon plant
buildings 50 A, 50 B, and 50 C were com
plete, but equipment had not been in
stalled. In place of Building 51, the
Calciner Building, Mr. Broadwell was
dependent on a small calciner, which was
located in the middle of 50 C. The ma
chine shop and store room were both
here, but much smaller than at present.
Pot room No. 22 was being excavateil,
and Building 19, Temporary Rotary Sta
tion, was being thrown together. The
majority of the plant work before this
time was of a general layout character.
Of course, the steam shovels were mak
ing the plantsite at that time. Where
the plant stands was a series of hills
and hollows. The steam shovels, under
the supervision of Tom McMinnon, were
working night and day making the place
fit to build on. The big flat area back
of Ebenezer Church owes its flatness to
these hills moved off of the Plantsite,
as it was at that time a hole in thtj
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view