North Carolina Newspapers

    JULY 25, 1954
PAGE THREE
Dramatic Photos Show Firing.
Army Adds Corporal Guided Missile To Weapons List
THE Department of the Army has announced the addition o
to be used in support of ground combat operations. The Corporal is p
troops.
Equipped with either an atomic° ~
f the Corporal Guided Missile to the fast-growing list of new weapons
roduced by the Firestone Company and delivery is being made to
or conventional type warhead, the
Corporal is a surface-to-surface
guided missile capable of engaging
tactical targets far beyond the
ranges of artillery or the new
280mm gun and “Honest John”
I'ocket. The weapon gives the field
commander far greater firepower
on the battlefield and enables him
to strike selected targets deep in
the enemy rear areas.
❖ *
the CORPORAL follows a bal
listic trajectory in its flight to the
target. Weather and visibility con
ditions place no restriction on the
L’se of the weapon. Motive power
is supplied by a powerful rocket
iiiotor. The missile travels through
Piant Roof Now Has
New Aviation Marker
A new air marker has been
painted on the roof of the plant
by members of the Gastonia
Squadron, Civil Air Patrol. The
sign replaces a marker which was
covered by the last coating of
asphalt and gravel applied to the
i'oof. The new sign, which will
identify Gastonia and point to the
Municipal Airport for the benefit
of aviators passing over, was
painted with long lasting traffic
paint furnished by the city.
Stork Cld
and Mrs. Hobart Munn, .Jr.,
announce the birth of a son, David
Keith, on ‘Wednesday, June 9, at
Gaston Memorial Hospital. Mr.
^ann is a twister tender.
Jack Guffey, doffer, and Mrs.
Guffey announce the birth of a son,
Donald Ray, on May 14 at Gaston
Memorial Hospital.
Twister Tender Hillard Terry
Mrs. Terry announce the
‘i th of a son, Hillard, Jr., on May
26.
J^offer Kenneth Bell and Mrs.
announce the birth of a son
^ June 17, at Gaston Memorial
hospital.
Service Awards
fifteen YEAR PINS
^^inton Guffey
p ten year pins
'-arding
I^Pal Bradley
^'visting
W. Jacobs
;^«kE.Tin„
j ■‘“‘ty Control
Cecil Bryant
L. Richburf?
^lUbert O 1
I'-ed
CoH ^^Sue
Shop
n T V
Johnson
space at several times the speed of
sound.
Essential components of the
weapon’s system include the
missile, a mobile launcher and
guidance equipment. The launcher
is a comparatively simple device
consisting of a light metal take
off pedestal. A self-propelled,
hydraulically operated erector
places the missile in firing posi
tion on the take-off pedestal.
As early as 1944, the California
Institute of Technology, under an
Army Ordnance contract, began
experiments in the application of
rocket propulsion to artillery range
missiles. These predecessors of the
Corporal were named the Private,
the Private First Glass, and the
WAG Cox'poral. Much of the field
test work was conducted at the
Army’s White Sands Proving
Ground, in New Mexico.
❖ * ❖
THE EARLY SUCCESS of the
experiments and the great poten
tialities of rocket propulsion led
to the establishment of the Jet |
Propulsion Laboratory, an Army
Ordnance owned installation op
erated under contract by the Cali
fornia Institute of Technology.
Recognizing the progress made in
the fields of rocket propulsion,
aerodynamics and guidance, the
Army requested the California In
stitute of Technology and the Jet
Propulsion Laboratory to under
take a full-scale guided missile de
velopment project. The result of
this program is the present model
of the Corporal.
5
m
(1) IN FLIGHT at White Sands Proving Ground, N. M., is the Corporal, the U. S. Army’s Surface-
to-Surface Guided Missile. The missile is produced by the Firestone Company for the Army. Firing of
the missile is shown in these dramatic official Army photos released by the Department of Defense.
(2) THE CORPORAL is carried on its tactical transporter-erector at start of preparations for
firing.
(3) BEING ELEVATED to erect position by its erector, the Corporal is shown as firing prepara
tions start.
(4) HAVING RAISED the Corporal to a firing position, the erector is lowered to its traveling
position on the transporter.
(5) INSPECTING the missile on the “Servicer.”
(6) FINAL A1).JUSTMENTS are made in preparation for firing.
(7) THE MISSILE is ready for firing.
(8) .lUST AFTER “Take-Off,” the missile starts toward its target.
1st Three Months
Of ^54 Stand As
Company’s Safest
The first three months of 1954
have proved to be the safest to
date for our Company plants. In a
recent report the Safety Depart
ment announced that the frequency
rate has been reduced by 23 per
cent and the severity rate by (51
per cent.
At the end of March the Com
pany’s accident frequency rate was
1.3 as compared with l.G last
year at the same time. The severi
ty rate was only 0.11 as compared
with 0.28 last year.
Fourteen plants of the Company
had an accident frequency rating
of 0.0 with no lost-time accidents
reported during the first quarter.
Included in these 14 are: Plant 2,
Pottstown Tire Plant, Hamilton,
Canada; Akron Steel Products,
Port Elizabeth, Lake Charles, Ben-
nettsville, Akron Synthetic Plant,
New Castle, Memphis Flotation
Gear, Woodstock, Canada; New
Zealand, Los Angeles, Xylos, and
Memphis, Xylos.
Company SponsQred Films
Added To Movie Schedule
In addition to the regularly
scheduled movies each Friday night
in the playground, the following
films—made available by the
Company—will be shown on the
dates indicated: “Goggles and
Gauntlets”—July 30; “America’s
Future Progress Depends on Bet
ter and Safer Highways”—Au
gust (5; “Liberia, Africa’s Only Re
public’'—August 13; and “The
Fabulous 500”—August 20.
inemortam
MRS. EARL HAMILTON
The employees of the Twisting
Department extend their deepest
sympathy to Earl Hamilton, twist
er tender, in the recent death of
h:s wife, Mrs. Earl Hamilton.
MRS. J. C. McCRAW
Mrs. J. C. McCraw, wife of
John McOaw, Carding Depart
ment, died at her home on Hooper
Street, June 13, following a long
illness. Mrs. McCraw was the
mother of Mrs. Polly (Carpenter,
SYC Weaving Department. Deej)-
est sympathy is-extended to the
McCraw family.
MR. WALTER H. LUNSFORD
Mr, Walter B. Lunsford, father
of Mrs. .loan Alexander, Main Of
fice, passed away July (5, at Dos
Arc., Arkansas. The employees of
Main Office extend their deepest
sympathy to the family.
JOHN W. GALLOWAY
John W. Galloway died at the
age of 84 on May 10. Burial was
held in Hiawasee, Ga. Mr. Gallo
way was the grandfather of Mrs.
Era Gribble, tie-in-hand, and made
his home in Gastonia.
BEN ROGERS
Ben Rogers, father of Herman
Rogers, yarn man, died at his home
in Franklin, N. C., on Friday, May
21.
MR. LEWIS P. HOPE
Lewis P. Hope, father of Doffer
Boyd Hope and Doffer Loyd Hope,
passed away Sunday, May 30. The
employees of the Twisting Depart
ment extend sympathy to the Iloiie
family.
    

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