North Carolina Newspapers

    February 10, 1955
Tir«$lone SfSW^
Page 7
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The skill, experience and loyalty of Firestone em
ployees ARE AMONG THE GREATEST ASSETS OF THE ORGANIZA-
^ON. Here Harvey S. Firestone, Jr., pins an orchid on
V. Mae Greer, the first employee to complete 50 years
OF SERVICE. More than 81 per cent of the entire work
ing force in Akron plants have continuous service
RECORDS OF FIVE YEARS OR MORE.
For the EIGHTH TIME IN THE LAST NINE YEARS, THE NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL PRESENTED
TO THE Company its Distinguished Service to Safety Award, the highest honor
GIVEN BY THE CoUNCiL IN INDUSTRIAL SAFETY. PRESENTING THE PLAQUE HERE TO DIVISION
managers IS J. E. Trainer, Executive Vice-President. Left to right: Glen D. Cross,
Safety Director; P. P. Crisp, Industrial Products; J. W. Maples, Tire Production;
J. E. Trainer, J. A. Meek, Industrial Relations; H. H. Waters, Engineering; L. J.
Campbell, Steel Products, and C. A. Hill, Synthetic Division.
For two days every other month the Red Cross Bloodmobile comes to
our Akron plants, and Firestone employees, during 1954, contributed 1,719
pints of blood, establishing an average of 143 pints a day against a quota
of 125 pints. Other Firestone plants also are participating in this very
worthy national program of the Red Cross.
In completing its thirty-sixth year, our suggestion program paid out
,402 for the 3,676 suggestions adopted by the Company. The highest
^Ward of the year was $1,500 presented to G. W. Seay, of Plant 2, Akron,
the design of multiple dies for extruding sidewalls for tires.
Youth activities are encouraged by all Firestone plants. The Company
^ontinued its close co-operation with such youth organizations as the
Future Farmers of America, 4-H Clubs and the Boy Scouts.
Employee participation in recreational activities of the Company in
■^kron and in our other plants was greater than ever.
. the FIRESTONE SCHOLARSHIP Program provides for annual
JJ^^cial assistance awards to worthy sons and daughters of Firestone
jnployees who seek a college education. The program is designed to pay
tuitions of and give help to 60 students annually.
p This scholarship program was developed by the management of the
^.^pany to make advanced educational opportunities available for the
nudren of employees who otherwise might not be able to afford a college
^^Ucation.
.The publications of our nine factories in the United States again
eceived national recognition in the field of employee communications when
ney were awarded the highest honor by the Freedoms Foundation in
J^petition with hundreds of other company publications. A similar award
won in 1958.
p. Last summer we published a picture history of the Company, titled
loiieer and Pacemaker, The Story of Firestone. This book has been dis-
gg ®uted to employees, stockholders and dealers, and we are at this time
^ding it to 20,000 libraries throughout the country.
continue to expand our educational aids program for public schools
- ^ have distributed, during the past year, approximately one million
of a new booklet on the history and importance of the rubber indus-
^ for the use of teachers and students.
R The “Voice of Firestone,” the oldest coast-to-coast radio program on
air, and one of the oldest in television, is now broadcast over the
jUties of the American Broadcasting Company’s television and radio
Jtwork. Last month the “Voice of Firestone” was singled out by the
j\^tiojjal Association for Better Radio and Television to receive the Lee
^ ® B'orest Award for the most outstanding cultural development of radio
^ television during the past year.
p. OUR COMPANY is in an excellent position for the new year. Our
g. Auction facilities are equipped to turn out more and better products with
Vjjji^ter economy and efficiency than ever before. The quality of our prod-
iij ® is unsurpassed and public preference for Firestone merchandise is the
i^^nest in history. Our sales organization has demonstrated its ability to
any challenge the future may hold. Our distribution system is the
^®st and strongest in our 54 years of service to the American people.
ijj louring the coming year there will be two million more cars and trucks
W}jj ^ than in 1954, and the number of vehicles requiring replacement tires
be the largest in history. It is anticipated that the production of new
Cl-A trucks, tractors and farm implements in 1955 will exceed that of 1954,
opting an expanded market for the sale of original equipment tires. Sales
J'\jJ?^tunities for our home and auto supplies, foamed rubber, industrial
^ products, plastics, chemicals, rims and other metal products appear
^0 greater during the coming year. Consequently, we are looking ahead
^55 with confidence and enthusiasm.
In completing its thirty-sixth year, the suggestion program paid
out $80,402 for the 3,676 suggestions adopted by the Company.
G. W. Seay of Plant 2, Akron, received the highest award of the
year, $1,500.
Approximately one million copies of a new booklet on the his
tory and importance of the rubber industry were distributed
through the educational aids program for public schools for use
OF teachers and students.
    

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