North Carolina Newspapers

    FEBRUARY. 1956
PAGE 7
Company Sales Territories
Now In Seven Divisions
Division sales territories of
the Company have been realign
ed to comprise seven divisions.
There used to be six divisions.
The changes were made to
permit division managers to di
rect their organizations more ef
fectively and to give greater
help to district managers in pro
ducing maximum sales and
profits, explains H. D. Tompkins,
Vice-President in Charge of
Trade Sales.
arrivals
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Price
announce the birth of a daugh
ter, Shirley Patricia, on Decem
ber 17. Mr. Price is a yarn pack
er in the Spooling Department.
The daughter, born January 4
to Mr. and Mrs. Bobby L. Setzer,
has been named Carol Ann Set
zer.
The father is a knot puller in
Rayon Weaving.
Two new divisions, the South
east and Southwest, replaces the
Company’s former Southern Di
vision. J. E. Davis, formerly
Manager of the Southsrn Divi
sion, has been appointed Man
ager of the new Southwest Divi
sion, with offices in Houston.
W. S. McGilvray, until recent
ly District Manager in Los
Angeles, has been named Man
ager of the Southeast Division,
with headquarters in Atlanta.
A NEW district office has been
established in San Antonio as
part of the Southwest Division.
District Manager there is W. H.
Olivarri who formerly held a
similar position in Houston. Re
placing him as Houston District
Manager is G. G. Shelton, for
mer District Store Supervisor
there.
The present Southwest Divi
sion includes these districts; Dal
las, Houston, Memphis, New
Orleans, Oklahoma City, and
San Antonio.
In the Southeast Division are
Atlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte,
Jacksonville, and Richmond.
Firestone ‘Guide Grip’ Tractor Tire
Features Body Of Gum-Dipped Cord
Provided by the Firestone
safety - tensioned, gum - dipped
TOrd body, greater resistance to
inipact breaks is an outstanding
feature of a new farm tire for
front wheels of tractors. De
velopment of the Firestone
Cruide Grip tire which will give
to 60 per cent longer wear
than any other front tractor
tire, has been announced by H.
Tompkins, Vice-President in
Charge of Trade Sales of the
Company.
The new tire has undergone
extensive field and road tests
^^^d now is available through
firestone dealers and stores.
Besides its qualities of long
^ear and resistance to impact
^^eaks, the tire has advantages
^hich feature;
^^tter steering and shorter turn
ing than conventional tires.
Better cleaning in all types of
soil conditions.
A built-in mud guard, or de
flector strip, which protects the
sidewall and beads.
A mud guard, or deflector
strip, was the answer of Fire
stone engineers to the problem
of earth, stubble and other field
debris injuring the tire bead
and sidewall. Extending above
the rim flange, the mud guard
deflects mud, earth and stubble.
In exhaustive tests in labora
tories and on Firestone Home
stead Farms in Columbiana,
Ohio, the new tire has proved to
be a superior front wheel tire
under all operating conditions.
Just Be Sure You Take The Axe
You’re a 20th century Robinson Cruso.
The only survivor of a shipwreck. The vessel
is about to break up on a reef. You can carry
something ashore; not much. At hand are
canned foods, a radio, an axe, clothing.
What to take? The decision will mean life
or death on the desert island.
You could take the canned foods. But
shortly you’d have nothing but empty tins.
The portable radio—for the sound of human
voices in your loneliness? But you can’t
build a shelter with run-down batteries.
Clothing? It would soon rot away.
You take the axe.
Now you have a tool. With the axe you can
build shelter . . . defend yourself . . . kill ani
mals for food . . . chop firewood. The axe
multiplies your strength and skills.
Man, by himself, is a pretty puny fellow.
But give him an axe and he’s a world-beater.
Better yet, give him an assembly line, ma
chine tools, horsepower—and he’ll provide
the luxuries of peace or if need be, the
sinews for defense.
There’s a problem, though. No one gives
away assembly lines or machine tools. And
it takes a $12,000 investment in tools and
materials for the average job.
Where do these tools come from? From
ordinary private citizens who plunked their
savings into shares of company ownership—
in the hope of earning a profit.
We in America have chosen to take the
axe, the tool. This choice of tools to produce
more has helped us to live better. Better
than any people, anywhere, at any time in
history.
Plant Publicized In Magazine Article
An article in the December 31
issue of The State, magazine of
Raleigh, published the well-
known fact that Firestone Tex
tiles is “the world’s largest tex
tile plant in the world under one
roof.” The article, a review of
industry in North Carolina, was
part of an entire issue devoted
to a comprehensive review of
opportunities in the North State,
its resources, industry, educa
tional system, agriculture, peo
ple, and other important phases
of life in the state.
Also in the special edition of
the magazine, an electrical com
pany illustrated its full-page ad
vertisement with two pictures
taken in the revolutionary elec-
tronically-controlled tire cord
dipping and tensioning unit at
the plant here.
NSC Gives Safe-Driving Hints
WHY TAKE
^JNnecessary chances?
■> .
^ccidents happen when you
expect them, when you’re
a hurry, when you pass up
^sing safety precautions for
jobs that take only a
httle time and effort to do. The
following are unnecessary
chances you should never take
OiHng or adjusting moving
^i^achinery
^ Grinding without goggles
Welding without goggles or
^ face shield
pfting heavy loads without
^ help
Removing or failing to re
place guards on dangerous
^achines
*>».S_AMERICAN mutual LIAB. ins. CO.
Recommendations for safe
winter driving, made by the Na
tional Safety Council, call for
the urgent attention of all
motorists. The vital rules sug
gested by the Council may be
summarized as follows:
Adjust speed to road and
weather conaitions after getting
the “feel” of the road.
Follow at a safe distance.
Pump brakes for stopping on
snow or ice.
Make sure that tires are in
good condition.
Use tire chains when neces
sary.
Keep windshield and windows
clean at all times.
Accept personal responsibili
ty for keeping your car safe for
driving under all winter condi
tions.
Injury and loss of life on the
highways may be prevented by
a careful observance of these
simple and sound suggestions.
Guessing Contest
From page 1
In the rivalry which consisted
in guessing winners and scores
in the traditional New Year’s
Day games, only four out of 620
entries from employees picked
all game winners correctly.
Upsets in most major bowl
games appeared to account for
the large number of incorrect
guessed among entries turned
in to the Recreation Department,
sponsor of the contest.
In the contests in 1954 and
1955 Catherine Fletcher, Rayon
Twisting, was first-place win
ner. With an unusual streak of
fortune, she picked all team win
ners correctly both years. In ad
dition, she predicted the actual
total score amassed by the teams
which played in major sports
bowls in 1955.
Houser-Brooks
Miss Beiiy Ann Brooks of
Shelby and Karl Edward Houser
of Fallsion exchanged vows in a
double ring ceremony on Christ
mas day at high noon in Beaver
Dam Baptist Church, near Shel
by.
Mr. and Mrs. Flay Brooks of
Shelby are the parents of Mrs.
Houser, Mr. Houser's parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Rochell Houser of
Fallston. Karl Houser is employ
ed in the Cloth Room here.
Right; Mr. and Mrs. Houser
Miss Sara Jean Thompson be
came the bride of William A.
Stalls, December 31 at Fairview
Baptist Church, Gastonia. The
church’s former pastor, W. G.
Rhinehardt, now of Waynes-
ville, read the ceremony. Mrs.
Stalls is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Otis A. Thompson; Mr.
Stall’s parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Mayo Stalls of Palmyra, N. C.
Mr. Thompson is second hand
in Rayon Twisting; Mrs. Thomp
son, a splicer.
Mr. and Mrs. Stalls live in
Sanford, N. C.
Miss Martha Ann Moss and
Harold K. Galloway were mar
ried in a ceremony at the parson
age of Bradley Memorial Metho
dist Church, December 23. The
pastor, J. Walter Kelly officiat
ed.
The bride is the daughter of
Mrs. W. W. Moss and the late
Mr. Moss. Mr. Galloway is the
son of Frank Galloway, yarn
man in Rayon Weaving, and Mrs.
Galloway, tie-in hand in Rayon
Weaving.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Galloway
live at 813 West Davidson ave
nue.
    

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