North Carolina Newspapers

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The Latest For Quarter Midgets
Ricky Molz, 12-year-old quarter midget race driver from
Uniontown, Ohio, meets Henry S. Richard, recently appointed
director of racing for the Firestone company.
Ricky's machine is equipped with the latest word in the way
of tires: Firestone Micro 500s, specially-built and patterned after
the company's midget race tire.
Engineered expressly for quarter midget and go-cart racing,
the Micro 500 features nylon cord and race tire construction.
PEOPLE, PLACES
and EVENTS
in the
J. O. VanDyke, in U.S. military service and on an assignment in
Germany, visited recently with Earl Redding, Mechanical depart
ment, and Mrs. Redding of Payroll. Mr. VanDyke is the husband
of the Reddings’ daughter Joyce. Mrs. VanDyke will continue to
stay in the States while her husband completes his assignment in
Europe. He was scheduled to return to Germany in early January.
Mr. and Mrs. Homer Hall and children visited Ted Ramsey in
Marietta, Ga., during the recent holiday season. Mr. Hall works
in plant sales. Mr. Ramsey at one time was in the Methods and
Standards department at Firestone in Gastonia.
Ann Wiley, Betty Moss and Jerry Barton attended the Decem
ber 20 wedding of Max Robinson and Miss Abbey Gibson, at
Gibson, N. C. Max is a brother of Ann Wiley, and Horace Robin
son in the Mechanical department. Their mother, Mrs. Nell Robin
son, works in the Cloth Room.
Mrs. Henry Gordon and a brother were to return to North
Carolina January 7, after having spent the Christmas holidays
in New York city. Mr. Gordon is a fork-lift operator.
Members of the Cotton Office and Warehouse staffs welcomed
R. W. Rainey back to work in late December. He had spent a
week in the hospital.
THE MASTER WEAVER
To All Employees
and Their Families
U. S. Savings Bonds are
a better buy than ever be
fore, in three important
ways:
o All Series E and H
bonds bought since June 1,
1959 now earn 3% per cent
interest when held to ma
turity.
o Older Bonds will also
pay more—an extra ¥2 per
cent from June 1 on, if you
hold them to maturity.
o All Series E Bonds—
old or new—now carry an
automatic extension privi
lege. They will keep pay
ing liberal interest for 10
years beyond maturity.
These are three big
DOLLAR benefits that
make it wise to buy new
Bonds—and hang on to the
ones you have!
But a good return is not
the only reason for buying
bonds. It is an easy, sys
tematic way to save.
You can buy Bonds au
tomatically through Pay
roll Savings Plan at Fire
stone; buy them at your
bank; and even your
youngsters can buy them
at school through the
School Savings Plan for
U. S. Savings Stamps.
Your Government guar
antees that the cash value
of your Bonds cannot drop
—it can only grow. If
Bonds should be lost, stol
en, or destroyed, the Treas
ury will replace them free.
Build a brighter future
for yourself and your fami
ly. U. S. Savings Bonds are
better than ever.
FROM THE PAST —Broadus
Moss of Twisting (synthetics)
and his son Wayne study the old
bell on the courthouse steps.
This holdover from the past be
longed to the courthouse which
ante-dated the present one
erected in 1907.
Shelby: Mark
Of New South
—From page 7
entire facility is valued at $1
million.
The Community Center and
its 120 acres include all types of
recreational facilities, such as a
nine-hole golf course, swimming
pool, tennis courts, athletic
fields, air-conditioned bowling
alleys, gymnasium and audi
torium, miniature golf course,
merry - go - round, smaU train,
amphitheatre, four picnic
grounds, and play-grounds for
different age groups.
Besides the Community Cen
ter, Shelby offers its Negro pop
ulation one of the South’s best
recreation centers at Holly Oak
Park, a 55-acre layout. It has
two lakes and swimming pool,
clubhouse, lighted ball park,
athletic field and stadium.
The Cleveland Country Club
has an 18-hole golf course, and
North Lake Country Club adds
to the recreational facilities.
Many industrial firms, churches,
schools, social groups, clubs and
fraternal groups sponsor recrea
tion programs.
The city also has a regular
concert series.
Good Health Resources:
A Community's Pride
Cleveland County Public
Health Department is housed in
a modern center which offers
several regular monthly clinics.
Cleveland Memorial Hospital is
an accredited facility with 175
beds, and a school of practical
nursing. Among other advan
tages here is a State-approved
care center for premature in
fants.
Two newspapers are publish
ed—The Shelby Daily Star, with
a circulation in excess of 12,000;
and a semi-weekly. The Cleve
land Times, which has a circula
tion of around 6,000. Other pub
lic information services are
radio station WOHS, a daytime
outlet, and its FM counterpart
which operates unlimited time;
and another daytime station,
WAD A.
Shelby has a municipal air
port and a feeder airport. Other
transportation facilities include
12 motor freight services, four
inter-city bus lines, and two
railroads.
FIRESTONE GROUP—Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Russ, both of Weav
ing (synthetics) live with their family on Route 2, Shelby. A
married son, Marvin Gene Russ, also of Route 2, works in Weaving
(synthetics). Here, at home Mrs. Russ passes out "samples" of her
homemade candy to daughters Roxie (left), Judy, and son Vernon.
Foundation Honors
Leonard Firestone
Former President Herbert
Hoover, Bernard M. Baruch, and
Leonard K. Firestone received
Achievement Awards of the
Deafness Research Foundation
recently, when the organization
marked its first anniversary.
Mr. Firestone is honorary
chairman of the voluntary health
group which was formed to en
courage public education and
research in the field of deafness.
At the presentation, he was
cited for “personal achievements
and contributions to social and
economic progress,” as well as
“the generous gift he makes of
himself in the fight to conquer
deafness, and the courageous ex
ample he has set in overcoming
deafness through the miracle of
modern surgery.”
FIRESTONE TEXTILES
P. O. BOX 551
GASTONIA. N. C.
POSTAL MANUAL
SECTION 134.1
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
GASTONIA, N. C.
PERMIT NO. 29
THE LIBRARY OF UNC
CHAPSL HILL, U. C.
Page 8 January, 1960
Form 3547 Requested
    

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