North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
THE PIEDMONITOR
MARCH, 1965
THEPiEomonim
Piedmont Aviation, Inc.
SMITH REYNOLDS AIRPORT
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.
Bonnie Hauch, Editor
CORRESPONDENTS THIS ISSUE
DIANE MARTIN
ROA-O
J. P. WHEELER
RDU
DON HOLIDAY
ROA-F
, BERT CARLOS
.... CMH
J. D. STORCH
INT
JOHN MORRIS
BAL
DAVE COOPER
.... PHF
J. L. THOMPSON
RIG
LOUISE RAMSEY ....
' CLT
RAY NORRIS
TRI
JOHNNY JOHNSON
.... ILM
ROBERT BEARD ....
FAY
RUTH SHUMATE
.... CRW
JIM DALLAS
SHD
J. W. DAWSON
.... DCA
DAVE MORRIS
..... HTS
JOYCE STOKES ATL
VFR
with
Turby
The inception of Daylight Saving Time in some areas of our
system on April 25 brings up the problem of a new schedule pat
tern, and believe you me, it is some problem!! If you don’t think
so, get yourself a big economy-size sheet of paper and try it.
Now here are some pointers if you wish to do it — You’ve got to
be non-biased about your own station and think how you can
get the most people on at forty-three stations. To do this, you’ve
got to have all the departures and arrivals at all these stations at
that magic hour. All the on-line and off-line connections have to
be at the right time and you must have all your airplanes end
up at the right place so they will be in position for the next trip
on tMe next day’s operation. Oh, yes, they have to overnight at
• a- maintenance base and where the crews can get at them to fly.
Don’t forget, some airports will not take an F-27. You must have
at least forty-five minutes for the turnaround time — preferably
an hour. Don’t forget the manpower and ramp problem at Station
X because if you get more than one trip in at the same time, they
can’t handle it. You’ve got summer and winter speeds to figure
on the F-27’s as they fly faster in cool weather than in hot weather.
Now that you have all the above accomplished, you’ve got a
perfect schedule (almost), so come on down — you’ve got your
self a job in scheduling.
All kidding aside, that’s what has taken so long. Hope it met
with everyone’s approval.
Ken Ross and Tom Cowen both have recently left their carry-
on baggage in the lobby at INT when they boarded their flights.
I wonder what is distracting their attention to that extent?!!
Adolescence is when you think you’ll live forever. Middle age
is when you wonder how you’ve lasted so long.
Everybody’s Money
by Freda Zappia
I
HOW MUCH DO YOU
REALLY PAY?
True Interest Rate?
“ Do you think you know how to figure it? You purchase an
item for $10; you pay the “interest and carrying charges” of $1.00
immediately, and agree to pay $1.00 a week for 10 weeks. What’s
the simple annual interest on this transaction? It comes to a
neat 104%.
Store Credit and Revolving Charge Accounts
In too many cases more profit is derived from interest than
from the goods or merchandise being sold. A refrigerator for
example, costing $329 and financed for 24 months could very
easily cost the purchaser an extra $66 for the credit. Most depart
ment stores’ revolving credit plans interest rates run at least 18%,
when figured on a yearly basis. Credit was originally instituted
by merchants and manufacturers to help sell their products and
services. Their credit business has now become a substantial
source of profits.
Borrow From Your Credit Union . . .
BECAUSE low rates save money;
BECAUSE repayment is worked out in regular amounts to
fit your income;
BECAUSE you get quick service—there’s no red tape;
BECAUSE the credit union is your organization—you own it;
BECAUSE loan protection insurance pays the loan balance in
case of death.
CMH Boasts Operation Snowplow
by Ray N, Campbell, CMH
Winter weather can cripple
airport operations even when
visibility and flying conditions
are “go.” But at Port Columbus
(CMH), snow and ice problems
are minimized as much as at
any airport in the world. This
airport is used for an alternate
landing point during bad wea
ther for such large airports as
Chicago, Pittsburgh, and New
York.
Over $100,000 worth of snow
removal equipment and approxi
mately twenty employed men
are on a 24 hour standby basis
from October 1 until May 1, and
can be in full operation within
45 minutes of any given time.
This means that all equipment
and men are out and working.
To fully explain what consti
tutes such a movement, one
must give a rundown of the
equipment that is co-ordinated
during the operation;
—2 jeeps with 4 wheel drive
and seven foot snow plows
—3 John Deere tractors with
8 foot snow plows
—1 International tractor
—2 ton and a half trucks with
9 foot snow plows
—2 sander trucks with 10 foot
reversible snow plow,
—1 GMC 8 ton sander
—1 La France 8 ton sander
QofuyuUi
20 YEAR PIN
Marvin Bauguess, Lead Me
chanic, INT, February 28
15 YEAR PIN
Don Burton Johnson, Lead Me
chanic, INT, February 1
Julian M. Riggs, Sr. Mechanic,
INT-FB, February 6
Bennie Walker, Captain, ATL,
February 9
Joseph Riley Gibson, First Of
ficer, ATL, February 14
Chester A. Hughes, Captain,
ILM, February 14
Paul N. Lyons, Cleaner, INT,
February 25
10 YEAR PIN
Sara Kelly, Reservationist, INT,
February 15
Ted Farrington, Jr., Chief Agt.,
BLF, February 16
Donald Wad Kimrey, Flight Pur
ser, INT, February 16
Charles William Morrison,
Agent, TRI, February 16
Robert F. Myrick, Parts Sales
Repr., INT-FB, February 16
Ross Gordon, Assistant Dis
patcher, INT, February 21
Thurman Jay Johnson, Chief
Agent, HTS, February 21
Bert Barnes, First Officer, INT,
February 28
Ed Pickel, Agent, TRI, Febru
ary 28
5 YEAR PIN
Bobby James Barnhardt, Me
chanic Specialist, INT, Febru
ary 1
Joseph Lee Elmer, Sr. Mechanic,
ORF-FB, February 1
Dale Alton Poole, Sr. Radio
Technician, INT, February 1
Warren W. Wishon, Mechanic
Specialist, INT, February 1
Lucien Wrenn, General Mana
ger, CPA, February 1
Frank Raymond Krynicki, Sr.
Mechanic, DCA, February 8
Colon Edward O’Neal, Inspec
tor, INT, February 9
SWAP TALK
BOAT AND TRAILER for
sale. 1% yr. old, 15 ft. fiberglass;
blue and white; 35 horsepower
Evinrude motor with electric
starter; will include skis and ac
cessories. Steve Willets, ILM.
1960 RAMBLER STATION-
WAGON for sale. Brown and
white, 55,000 actual miles, good
condition. Capt. Berryhill, ILM.
’53 PONTIAC for sale. Blue
and white. New seat covers. Sta.
Mgr. S. Y. Pierce, ILM.
The CMH “Sno-Go" sends snow flying up to 30 feet in the air. Winter
equipment can have Port Columbus ready for business in 30 minutes.
—1 four ton sander with no
snow plow
—1 four wheel drive type
truck with reversible “L” type
snow plow
—1 snow blower capable . of
throwing snow 30 to 40 feet
—2 case type loaders for sand
—1 chain type snow loader
—1 “Weed Burner” for melt
ing ice
Furthermore, each piece of
equipment is equipped with two-
way radios. There is also a furn
ace heated barn for keeping 800
tons of dry sand on hand to
facilitate the operation.
Within thirty minutes, this
mass wave of machinery can
have a runway 10,700 feet long
plowed and sanded, plus having
an air taxi way and ramp area
cleared for safe operation.
To work with the advantage
of such facilities can be an ex
perience well appreciated, but
probably never to full value un
less compared to other stations,
both large and small, that have
not shared the same advantage.
The most interesting part of
the whole operation is standing
by and observing what seems to
be a militant platoon of soldiers
so schooled in their objective
that in a given moment they
can turn what at first seems an
impossibility into an immediate
conquest against the forces of
Winter.
Imagine never having to
worry about snow and ice! That
is the assurance and confidence
we feel in Columbus. Thanks to
progress, the adverse elements
of nature seem truly to vanish
under the impact of “Operation
Snowplow.”
THE PIEDMONT
POSTMAN
Dear Sir:
Last Thursday my law partner
and I were flying in to Wash
ington from New York, and I
had reservations on a Piedmont
plane which left Washington at
7:30 p.m. We went up, to the in
formation desk and Miss Robert
son and Mr. Matheis, your em
ployees, told us there was a
plane . leaving in about fifteen
minutes that would put us in
Roanoke around 8;00 p.m. They
promptly busied themselves to
change our reservations to the
earlier plane.
Both of them did so gracious
ly, courteously and efficiently.
We were very grateful and
both of us were so impressed
with these young persons that
we just wanted to say “thank
you.” Both of them are strang
ers to us, but we so appreciated
their interest that we asked
them for their names — hence
this letter.
I have traveled on the Pied
mont line many, many times
and your employees have al
ways been considerate and cour
teous, but these two especially
went beyond the call of duty
and for this we are both very
appreciative.
Sincerely,
L.G.M.
Dear Sir:
Too often in these trying and
busy times we find ourselves
very quick to criticize; however,
when someone has been especial
ly deserving of our praise, all
too often we do not find the
time to even say “thanks.”
I should like to say “thanks.”
Recently, I became a victim of
an inadvertent scheduling by my
travel agency and missed my
plane at your New Bern, N. C.,
terminal. Therefore, I had to
wait over six and a half hours
for the next flight.
Your Mr. Morrison went out
of his way to be courteous and
to render every possible service
to me in my dilemma. I shall
long remember his acts of kind
ness.
Wishing your airline con
tinued success.
Very truly yours,
B.B.K.
Dear Mr. Davis:
I wish to call your attention
to the unsual qualities of Miss
Juanita Mutter, one of your
senior employees at the Wash
ington National Airport, and the
significant help and assistance
she gave to one of Piedmont’s
passengers.
On Sunday, January 24, our
86 year old friend arrived at
National Airport on another air
line to take Piedmont’s evening
flight to Roanoke. Miss Mutter
was on duty when Mrs. R. ar
rived at Piedmont’s ticket coun
ter and immediately recognized
her need for assistance and re
assurance. Mrs. R. is both blind
and almost totally deaf.
Weather conditions were such
as to make it doubtful that Mrs.
R.’s flight on Piedmont would
land at Roanoke, so Miss Mut
ter recommended to her that
she not risk an over-flight and
that she stay overnight in Wash
ington. Miss Mutter then ques
tioned Mrs. R. as to the names
of her friends here and was
given our name first. Miss Mut
ter then telephoned me to ex
plain the situation. I requested
her to advise Mrs. R. that I
would drive in immediately and
bring her to our home to spend
the night with us. Miss Mutter
also made calls to the lady’s
(Continued on Page Six)
    

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