North Carolina Newspapers

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VOL. VII, NO. 9
1940 — CELEBRATING TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF SERVICE — 1965
SEPTEMBER, 1965
PARKERSBUaC - MARIETTA
BALTIMORE
WASHINGTON
(NATIOKAL))
WASHINGTON
(DULLES)
STAUNTON
HARRISONBUKC -
WAYNESBORO -
ASHLAND • HUNTINGTON
CHARLESTON
CHABLOTTESVILLE
LEXINGTON
PBAKKFORT
HOT SPRINGS
BECXLEY
RICHMOND
PRINCETON -
BLUEPIELD
LYNCHBURG
NEWPORT NEWS - HA>0>TOH
LONDOH - CORBIN
NORFOLK
BLACKSBURG >
RADFORD •
PULASKI
DANVILLE
BRISTOL
JOHNSON cm
KINGSPORT
ELIZABETH CITY
RALEIGH -
DURHAM
WINSTON-SALEM
CKY MOUNT
GREENSBORO
HIGH POINT
KNOXVILLE
HICKORY
PINEHURST
SOUTHERN PINES
ABERDEEN
ASHEVILLE - HENDERSONVILLE
GOLDSBORO
CHARLOTTE
FAYETTEVILLE
WILMINCTON
PLORENCE
AUGUSTA
, NEW BERN • HOREHEAD CITY •
' BEAUFORT - JACKSONVILLE
Broken line shows proposed route additions to the Piedmont system.
Piedmont Is Seeking
Route To New York
Piedmont Airlines has filed
with the Civil Aeronautics Board
an application for authorization
to provide service between Roa
noke, Va., and New York City
via Lynchburg, Va., Charlottes
ville, Va., Hot Springs, Va., and
Harrisonburg Staunton Waynes
boro, Va., with new service also
provided to Washington, D. C.,
through Dulles International Air
port.
The filing by Piedmont an
swers a need expressed by vari
ous cities in Virginia for one-
plane service to New York City.
Dulles International is the new
multi-million dollar jetport lo
cated in Northern Virginia and
serving the nation’s capitol. The
application, if awarded, would
provide connections for Pied
mont’s passengers there as well
as New York. Virginia civic and
aviation leaders have for some
time requested that Piedmont
serve Dulles.
President T. H. Davis, in com
menting on the new application
said: “We concur with our Vir
ginia customers that new serv
ice is needed to New York be
yond our present route sys-
New Equipment
To Improve
Communications
Les Watson, Director of Com
munications, has announced
several recent changes which
will improve the overall effi
ciency of Piedmont’s communi
cations.
Since June 1, seven stations
have been added to the long
line bringing the total number
of stations having long line com
munications to 25. Columbus,
Charleston, Huntington, Cincin
nati (City, Field and Mainten
ance), Louisville (Operations and
Maintenance), and Lexington
were added to the system on
June 1. Knoxville Operations,
Reservations, and Maintenance
received the long line August 1.
Piedmont uses TELPAK, a
package agreement with Ameri
can Telephone and Telegraph
(AT&T) whereby an airline
can obtain long line communi
cations at a greatly reduced rate.
As of June 1, additional TEL
PAK units were made available,
enabling the Company to expand
its network of long line com
munications.
Datanet 30, scheduled to go
into full-scale operations on Au
gust 1, was not put into service
until August 21. The computer
is now handling all Piedmont’s
teletype traffic. It also handles
interconnecting traffic with
Eastern Airlines, Delta Airlines,
United Airlines, and Southern
Airways, and will soon handle
interconnecting traffic with all
domestic carriers and interna
tional carriers operating into the
United States.
Minor problems have, of
course, been encountered, and
changes in programming are
being made daily.
Mr. Watson commented, “We
are continuing to monitor these
circuits and from the reports
will continue to improve the
system daily to achieve maxi
mum efficiency from the com
puter.”
I NT Trains '"'Volunteer" Firemen
It was a hot day, over 90
degrees, yet the men were wear
ing protectively heavy coats. The
sun seemed even hotter as it
glared off the end of the old
runway at INT.
Along with 22 Piedmont em
ployees, Winston-Salem city and
county firemen were practicing
extinguishing a crash fire. They
ignited 55 gallons of gasoline
that had been poured over two
old automobiles, and before the
first boom of the blaze had died
down, the hoses were out and
the black jacketed, shiny hel-
meted students were spraying
water everywhere.
The Piedmont men were tak
ing an active part in the 20 hour
fire fighting course which is
part of the extension program
at Forsyth Technical Institute.
Instructors for the course were
Carl Vaughn, who is Assistant
Fire Chief at Seymour Johnson
Air Force Base and Staff Sgt.
Dwight Shelby, also of Seymour
Johnson.
The newly acquired 0-10 foam
crash truck will be stationed at
the airport. The complicated net
work of dials and gadgets inside
the cab of the truck are, for the
most part, interchangeable with
airplane parts. This particular
type of crash truck was develop
ed and designed for use over
seas.
The foam, especially on that
hot day in August, gave off a
far from pleasant odor. It is
made of animal by-products such
as fat, ground up chicken feath
er, and blood. The truck carries
500 gallons of water and 50 gal
lons of foam.
From 40 volunteers for the
course at Piedmont, the 22 men
were selected on the basis of
previous experience and their
regular work shifts. Men from
the Accessory Shop, Mainten
ance Stock Room, Overhaul and
Sheet Metal departments took
part in the program. After the
completion of the initial 20
hours of training they will con
tinue to devote a minimum of
two hours per month to further
study.
A direct hook up of the fire
signal will be installed in tlic
hanger. Chief Fire Marshall, H.
K. Scott, who is otherwise a
lead mechanic in the Sheet Me
tal department, said that he is
anticipating the purchase of six
fire fighting uniforms. The cost
of these is approximately $100
per man.
Piedmont’s firemen will stand
by for alerts, I, II and III, which
are I, an actual crash; II, a
possible crash; and III, military
aircraft landing.
Mr. Scott feels that this opera
tion is an excellent addition to
the fire fighting program which
has. existed in the hanger for
a little over a decade. This most
recent fire plan was set up pri
marily for the rescue of passen
gers.
tem and we are hopeful that
the CAB will agree that the
new route segment would serve
the public convenience and
necessity. We are grateful for
the interest in this matter al
ready shared by our friends in
Virginia and elsewhere.”
The filing of the application
is the first step in obtaining
authorization for the proposed
route. For further action to be
taken, the CAB must order a
hearing to consider the request,
at which time all interested par
ties would be given an opportun
ity to be heard.
According to Director of Re
search Robert Kadlec, Piedmont
can expect at least a three year
waiting period before final ac
tion will be taken and, should
such action be favorable, for
Piedmont to inaugurate service.
Airline Increases
Flight Miles
By 1400 A Day
Piedmont Airlines, effective
with its September 26 schedule,
will be adding 1400 plane miles
a day to its present flying sched
ule.
The increase is mostly a rp-
sult of four additional trips: Wil
mington - Fayetteville - W^ashing-
ton; Washington-R o a n o k e-Tri
Cities; Tri-Cities-Richmond-Wash-
ington; and Washington-Fayette-
ville-Wilmington.
These flights have the effect
of providing Fayetteville with
non-stop service to and from
Washington and giving Tri Cit
ies new one-stop service to and
from the Capitol.
The improved schedule also
reflects Virginia’s return to East
ern Standard Time. West Vir
ginia has already returned to
Standard Time and Washington
and Maryland will go back on
October 26.
f, iiiHlHiiTiinrii *■ ^
I INT tire fighter Ted Harrison leads the hose brigade on the left.
Piedmont fireman trainee Bob Saunders hoses himself down after
assisting his fellow workers in putting out a practice blaze.
    

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