North Carolina Newspapers

    For Sale: Something Worth Buying
If it hasn’t happened, it will soon.
“It” will be a pretty young lady knocking
on your door to offer you an attractive prop
osition—a chance to make an important in
vestment—in Series “E” U.S. Savings Bonds.
This is part of Piedmont’s Annual U. S.
Savings Bond Payroll Deduction Campaign.
The Chairman of the Company Drive for 1971
is Director — Operations Planning C a r r ol 1
Gambill. The pretty solicitors were his idea,
and they can easily tell you how a minus on
your paycheck can be a plus in your future.
That sounds confusing, but it isn’t really.
When you join the Payroll savings plan, an
IS THIS ANY WAY TO RUN A BOND CAMPAIGN?
“You bet!" says Carroll Gambill, who is chairman of
this year's Savings Bond Drive for the Company. Help
ing Carroll sign up participants are Rachel Lev/is, Judy
Clark and Bonnie Bennett. Another of his pretty help
ers is Linda Knight, who missed the picture-taking.
I
pnamonmm
amount you designate will be set aside auto
matically from each paycheck. That’s the
“minus.”
That amount will then be invested in U. S.
Savings Bonds. This is where the “plus”
comes in, because you are automatically sav
ing for your future with one of the safest in
vestments there is.
And, by deducting a little at the time from
each paycheck, you don’t feel the pinch finan
cially. Before you know it, you have quite a
tidy sum tucked away.
And now there is a bonus interest rate on
all U. S. Savings Bonds—for E Bonds, 5%
when held to maturity of 5 years, 10 months
(4% the first year). That extra payable
as a bonus at maturity applies to all bonds is
sued since June 1, 1970, with comparable im
provement for all older bonds.
It is hard to save a buck. By the time the
bills are paid there is not much left to
squeeze out of your check for savings, but
bonds are a way to build a nest egg without
having to worry about it.
The Payroll Savings Plan. A great way to
save a little here, a little there, and end up
with a bankroll.
VOL. XXII, NO. 5
MAY, 1971
DIRECTORS PROMOTE AND ELECT OFFICERS
The Board of Directors met the latter part
of April and promoted two officers and elect
ed two new Company officers.
Former Assistant Vice President — Flight
Operations, W. 0. (Jack) Tadlock was promot
ed to Vice President for that department. K.
E. Hoss, former Assistant Vice President was
named Vice President—Traffic.
Newly elected officers are W. A. Blackmon,
Assistant Vice President—Ground Operations,
and C. W. Gough, Assistant Vice President—
General Aviation Division.
The Directors also elected W. Frank Dowd
Pirector Emeritus. Dowd has served on Pied
mont’s Board since 1950. He is Chairman of
the Board of Charlotte Pipe and Foundry.
Jack Tadlock joined Piedmont as a co-pilot
in 1947. A native of Marshville, North Caro
lina, he went to school in Charlotte and was
a pilot with the U. S. Army Air Corps. He also
flew for 20th Century Airlines in Charlotte
prior to joining Piedmont. Tadlock was pro
moted to Captain the same year he was hired.
He became a check pilot in 1959 and in 1960
was named Director—Flight Operations. He
was promoted to Assistant Vice President—
Flight Operations in 1968.
Tadlock is married to the former Ann Tal-
ton of Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They have
one son and one daughter.
Ken Ross joined Piedmont as Station Man
ager for Raleigh-Durham in 1948. Originally
from Nashville, North Carolina, he went to
school in Tiffin, Ohio, and later attended the
University of North Carolina and Aeronautical
University in Chicago, Illinois. He worked
for TWA, Eastern and American Overseas
Airlines prior to coming to Piedmont. His mil
itary service was with the U. S. Navy.
Ross was promoted to Assistant Superinten
dent of Stations in 1951 and Superintendent
of Stations in 1957. He was named Assistant
Vice President—Traffic in 1968.
Mrs. Ross is the former Hiawatha Watts of
C a n to n. North Carolina. They have two
daughters.
Will Blackmon came to Piedmont as an
agent at Lexington, Kentucky in 1950. A na
tive of Hopewell, Virginia, he went to school
in Sumter, South Carolina and was an Avia
tion Machinist Mate 1st Class with the U.S.
Navy before joining the Company. He came
to Winston-Salem in 1951 as a traffic clerk
and was later named Air Mail and Cargo Su
pervisor. Blackmon was promoted to Supervis
or of Ground Operations for Piedmont in 1957.
He was subsequently promoted to Assistant
to the Senior Vice President—Operations.
Mrs. Blackmon, a native of Springfield,
Mass., is the former June Aldrich. They have
one daughter and one son.
Assistant Vice President—General Aviation
Division C. W. Gough joined Piedmont as a
mechanics helper in 1943. He is from Forsyth
County, North Carolina, where he also went
to school.
Gough was named Parts Manager in 1948
and became Assistant to the Senior Vice Pres
ident of the General Aviation Division in 1962.
He is married to the former Barbara Pfaff
of Pfafftown, North Carolina. They have one
daughter.
Will Blackmon, C. W. Gough, Ken Ross and Jack Tadlock were all smiles over their recent promotions.
Airline Loss
Isf Quarter Reporf Shows General Aviation
Gain
Aircraft sales by Piedmont’s general avia
tion divisions increased from $908,889 during
the first quarter of 1970 to $2,364,032 in the
same period this year, according to the Com
pany’s first quarter report released recently.
Total sales for this division rose by 58%
and pretax profits grew from $48,070 to $125,-
808.
President Davis’ report to the stockholders
also pointed out that Piedmont Aviation, Inc.,
has acquired a 11 the outstanding shares of
stock of Greensboro-High Point Air Service,
Inc., a general aviation operator with offices
located at Friendship Airport of Greensboro,
North Carolina.
The airline operation reported total rev
enues of $17,297,477 as compared to $15,850,-
021 for the same period last year. Expenses
were $19,297,223 for 1971. The 1970 figure
was $17,995,683. The income (loss) before in
come taxes was $1,999,746 for this year, as
compared to $2,145,662 for 1970.
In further comments to the stockholders,
(Continued on Page Three)
    

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