North Carolina Newspapers

    Man creates Imnself
by his own activity.
—Kant
VOL. XXIV, NO. 3
ARCHIVES
Bennett College
iifeensborok N. C.
THE BENNETT BANNER
BENNETT COLLEGE
GKEENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Knowledge is in eveiy
counti'y I li e surest
basis of public happi
ness.
— Washington
FEBRUARY, 1957
SERVICE HONORS DR. DAVID D. JONES
Graduating Seniors
Guests Of President
On Sunday morning, January
20 at eight, a group of seniors who
have completed thia requirements
for their degrees from Benneft
College, were entertained by Dr.
Player at her home for breakfast.
The seniors who attended were
Thelma Culbert, New York; Queen
Farrish, Roxboro; Margaret Wil
liams, Fernandina Beach, Florida;
Sylvia Pretlow, Rocky Mount;
Helen Frances, Lumberton; Shir
ley Moore, Jamaica, New York;
Jean Moore, Rich Square; and
Carolyn Crawford, ?
The setting for the breakfast
was pleasant and informal and
the girls enjoyed a menu includ
ing: melon balls, bacon and sau
sage, scrambled eggs, grape jielly
and butter; cinnamon biscuits and
toast and coffee.
The breakfast for all gradu
ating seniors is a Bennett tradi
tion. Each girl is entertained at
the home of the President on a
Sunday morning before bidding
farewell to the familiar surround
ings of Bennett College.
¥
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New Faculty Member
And Students Arrive
Addition of one new faculty
member was announced at Bennett
College as the second semester
began on Monday.
Mr. Roger L. Askew, of Kansas
City, Kansas, has been added as
an instructor in drama and speech.
Mr. Askew, an A. B. from Fisk
University, earned his M. A. in
dramatic arts at Western Reserve
University in Cleveland, Ohio.
Three freshmen were accepted
for the second semester. They are:
Misses Alice Ingram, Guilford,
N. C.; Barbara Smith, Atlantic
City, N. J.; and Sylvia Byrd,
Clarksville, Delaware. Miss In
gram is a sister of Miss Barbara
Ingram, who enrolled in Septem
ber, and of Miss Lois Ingram, who
was graduated last year.
Seven former students have re
turned to the campus. They are:
Misses Bettye Alexander, senior,
of New York, N. Y.; Anece Faison,
sophomore, of Dudley, N. C.; Mil
dred Plowden, junior, of Greens
boro; Louise Pope, sophomore, of
South Pittsburg, Tenn.; Laura
Rowe, junior, of Goldsboro; Julie
Rivers, sophomore, of Hilton Head,
S. C.; and Mrs. Juanita J. McCain,
senior, of Charlotte.
Musical Groups
Perform
The Bennett College Quartette
will sing for the Western District
Conference of the Methodist
Church on February 20th at Wells
Spring Methodist Church in For
est City.
On February 1, the Freshman
Choir sang for the Greensboro
District Conference at the Celia
Phelps Methodist Church at Red
Hill.
METHODIST SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS - At the altar in Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel are
five winners of scholarships given by the Methodist Chimh. From, left to right: Delores lonkins,
junior; Jimmie English, junior; Helen Houston, freshman; Edna Jackson, sophomore; and Wil-
helmina Bundy, sophomore.
Organist Heard ,Mr. Alien Writes
Magazine Article
Virgil Fox, Organist of the
Riverside Church in New York
City, who recently presented a
concert in the chapel.
Virgil Fox, distinguished organ
ist of the Riverside Church in New
York Ci’iy, was heard in a con
cert on Tuesday, January 8, at
eight o’clock. Mr. Fox has pledged
many concerts here in the United
States and in Europe.
For his concert, which was one
of the highlights of our 1956-57
Lyceum Series, Mr. Fox chose
familiar organ numbers by Bach
to open his program. Among those
were “Now Thank We All Our
God” and the famous “Toccata in
F Major.” Also included were the
Prelude, Sicilienne and Toccata
from Opus 5 of a suite by the
famous organist, Durufle, who
Mr. Fox told of having known and
worked with personally.
The concluding number was the
interesting and colorful, “Fantasy
and Fugue on the Chorale “How
Brightly Shines thie Morning Star”
by Reger.
Van S. Allen, biology instructor
at Bennett College, is the author
of “Creeping Paralysis” in the
January issue of International Stu
dent.
The magazine, published by the
Intercollegiate Association for the
Study of the Alcohol Problem,
Columbus, Ohio, is particularly
concerned in this issue with the
problem of the drinking driver.
Happiness lies not in the mere
posfession of money; it lies in the
joy of achievement; in the thrill of
creative effort.
—Roosevelt.
Mr. Whileman
Gives Full
Organ Service
At 11 A. M. on Sunday, Janu
ary 20, the college organist, Mr.
Clarence E. Whiteman, presented
what seems to be becoming an
annual complete service of organ
music.
Mr. Whiteman began with a
prelude by the contemporary com
poser Noel George DaCosta. The
invocation and the prayer heard
later in the service were by the
famous organ composer, Alex
andre Guilmant.
The highlight of the service was
Vhe impressive and stirring, mes
sage consisting of Marcel Dupre’s
interpretation of the passion
story, “Le Chemin de la Croix.”
Following the closing hymn,
Benediction by Alec Rowley af
ter which the audience went out
to the strains of “Carillon-Sortie.”
SCHEDULE
OF
EVENTS
February
February
February
March 1
March 2-
March 9-
March 25
15—Birthday Dinner
16—Y. W. C. A. Party
23—1. R. C. Party
—Lyceum Program
The Cunis String
Quartette
Kappa Phi Party
Tomu Tacky Party
-30—Homemaking
Institute
Outstanding
Vesper Speakers
To Be Heard
Students at Bennett College will
hear four outstanding Sunday ves
per speakers during the month of
February.
Dr. James S. Thomas of the
Board of Education of the Metho
dist Church, Nashville, Tenn.,
spoke on February 3. Associate
secretary of the Division of Edu
cational Institutions, Dr. Thomas
annually visits the campuses of
the denomination’s colleges and
universities.
Speaking on February 10 was
the Rev. Samuel H. Sweeney, pas
tor of St. Mark’s Methodist
Church in New York City, and
on February 17, Miss Thelma
Stevens of the Woman’s Division
of Christian Service, New York
City, is scheduled to be heard.
Dr. Luther H. Foster, president
of Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee,
Alabama, will speak on February
24.
Late President
Given Tribute
Dr. David Dallas Jones, presi
dent of Bennett College from 1926-
1955 and president emeritus from
1955-1956, was recently honored
by some of the many students and
friends who knew and loved him.
On Sunday, January 13, in the
Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel at
ihe regular vesper hour, a service
of remembrance was held. The
service which opened with the
hymn “For All the Saints, Who
from Their Labors Rest” and
closed with “Now on Land and
Sea Descending,” featured as the
principal speaker. Dr. Henry Hitt
Crane, pastor of the Central Meth
odist' Church of Detroit, Michigan.
Dr. Crane, who had been a close
friend of Dr. Jones presented a
message of tribute to Dr. Jones.
He spoke of the past, present and
gave us an insight into hope for
the future of our college and the
world.
Dr. Crane said: “I think of Dr.
Jones, first and foremost, as the
finest example of a gentleman that
I have ever known. He possessed
all of the essential characteristics
of a gentleman . . . patience, hu
maneness, absence of envy, humil
ity, courtesy, unselfishness, self-
control, and high-mindedness.
“He was as ideal an educator as
I have ever known, a combination
administrator-teacher who some
how incarnated the things he
wanted to teach. He lived what he
talked and had a rational clarity
that enabled him to detach himr
self from the superficial and to
get to the heart of a matter. He
acted with a spontaneity that gave
validity to his motives.”
Dr. Crane further characterized
Dr. Jones as a man who trusted
in God and who had a quality of
faith that he transmitted to others.
“He had a stubborn loyalty to
his ideals and to his friends. He
loved his fellow man, not with
gushy sentimentality, but with a
disciplined concern for his wel
fare. He was a great friend—your
friend and my friend. He built his
monument in the lives of others.”
Mrs. Lydia Jetton Rogers, oi
Washington, D. C., a 1936 Bennett
graduate, in her tribute to Dr.
Jones, referred to him as a man
who believed in giving freely of
himself, who believed in the dig
nity of man and in the therapy of
work well done.
“We see his creed living on these
grounds and in the lives of every
Bennett woman,” she said.
During the service the College
Choir r.andered one anthem, Rob
ert Elmore’s “Out of xhe Depths.”
The text being taken from the
130th Psalm.
Progress in learning is depend
ent upon knowledge of results and
it follows from this that the more
complete, specific, and immediate
the knowledge, the better will the
learning proceed.
—Hollingworth.
    

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