North Carolina Newspapers

    The
GardrLer-Wehh University
Friday, April 18,2003
WWW. gwupilot com
Volume 6 No. 14
Inflation, two
presidents’
salaries factors
in increase
Jennifer Menster
Pilot design editor
On average, the overall cost to
attend Gardner-Webb goes up about
$ 1,000 each year.
Next year will be no exception for
students.
The board of trustees recently
approved a $1,100 increase in overall
cost .from $18,200 in 2002-03 to
$19,300 in 2003-04.
Five years ago, during the 1999-
2000 academic year, overall cost was
$15,410.
Neal Alexander, chairman of the
board of trustees, said the board felt the
increase in tuition was necessary, based
on the expenses. “Students may feel that
the increase is not tangible to them,”
Alexander said, “but the increase is tan
gible to the university for grounds,
painting, retaining the quality of teach
ers and supplies.”
Students and parents should expect
an increase in cost each year, said Scoot
Dixon, vice president for enrollment
management.
“We try to keep the increase
between 4 and 6 percent each year,”
Dixon said. “Our intent has always been
to be responsible not to let the increase
get too high."
Dixon said that if the university
were to hold costs the same for several
years, then the price would skyrocket
On the Inside
19,300
18,200
17,400
16,420
15,410
99-00
00-01
01-02
02-03
03-04
about 14 percent.
Administration was successful in
keeping overall cost to a 6 percent raise;
however, tuition went up 7 percent from
$6,610 to $7,080.
Both Dixon and Interim President
Frank Campbell gave several reasons
for the increase in the cost of admission,
such as professor pay raises, new pro
grams and majors and an increase in
insurance, general op "rations and infla
tion.
According to Dixon, inflation went
up about 3 percent for the cost of living.
However, inflation is based on which
products are bought. For example, tech
nology is in high demand, so the infla
tion rate for it is much higher.
Like many other universities of
Gardner-Webb’s status, the institution
relies heavily on tuition to help balance
the budget. In March, the trustees
approved a budget of more than $50
million.
Campbell said the administration
wanted to keep the budget under $50
million, but couldn’t do it this year.
The budget is divided into two
basic categories - revenue (money the
school brings in) and expenditures
(money the school spends). At the
beginning of each calendar year, each
department of the university will submit
an expenditure budget to senior staff,
who will cut and reduce prices as much
as possible.
see Increase page 2
You do the math
• Currently there are 1,232
full-time day students. If you
multiply that by the total cost
of enrollment for the coming
year, $19,300, the total is
$23,777,600. This does not
include part-time students,
graduate students or satellite
student costs.
How will the tuition
increase affect you?
“I am transferring to a state
school because it’s about 1/3 of what
it costs to go to
GWU. I think it’s
ridiculous that the
tuition is going up.
I understand that
the school needs
money, but I don’t
agree with it. I
think that a lot of
students will be
hurt by it.”
— Heather Randazzo,
sophomore
“I am transferring, and money
does have some
thing to do with it. I
have so many loans
to be here—transfer
ring and being con
sidered out of state at
another school will
cost about half as
much as being here.”
—Amanda Longmire,
sophomore
"Being on my
own without any
help from my
parents, this is a lot
of money for me. If
the tuition goes up,
1 want to know
where the money is
going. ”
— Dan Walz, freshman
ROTC
program to
come to
Gardner-Webb
page 3
Administrators
Get to know
“What a Girl
Baseball team
News.... page 2-3
propose
the Board of
Wants”perfect
defeats Western
Features... page 4-5
Op/Ed.... page 6
College of Arts
Trustees
family genre
Carolina
and Science....
movie
, . , page 8
A&E.... page 7
page 3
pages 5
page 7
Sports page 8
    

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