North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
THE LANCE
Staff
Jeff Neill
Lani Baldwin
Marshall Gravely
Kathy Kearny
Dave Mills
Hunter Watson
Mr. Fowler Dugger
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Blessings . . . Pope
I must confess.
I broke a “Blue-Card” rule this week.
It wasn’t really my fault. I had to do it.
Maybe I had better explain the crime first.
When I got back to campus this year I found my room minus
air conditioning. Being the rule-follower that I am, I im
mediately went to my dorm manager, who reported the mal
functioning equipment to the stellar maintainance crew.
Nothing. My air conditioner was still putting out heat.
So, I complained again.
Still nothing.
This went on for several days. I then called maintainance
myself, the man who answered the phone said he would make
a note and get to it the next day.
You guessed it, nothing.
After ten days, a cold and Impending pneumonia, I made
my death-bed decision - I would ask someone in my suite to
check the little knob in the ceiling. (It has a hot and cold di
rection on it or something mechanical like that and I could not
picture myself being mechanical.)
Also, my room mate is against breaking the RULE S on this
campus, so I had to chose a time when he was out of the room.
Anyway, by having someone else do it I could always plead
innocent if I am called up before the Blue-Card-Rules Com
mittee.
I mean, how could I lie. There I was in the arms of almost
death and could not recognize anyone in the room. (Well,
that sounds dramatic anyway.)
The system was fixed. The knob wasn’t on cold. Lord knows
where it was.
Now my room is air conditioned, and I am almost cured of
the terrible disease brought on by this whole event.
I told my room mate that maintainance had fixed it. It
makes me feel better to be able to keep someone’s faith going.
Of course I am now living in fear of being caught. Who knows
what horrible punishment is in store for me. They could torture
me by taking away my meal card.
Speaking of the cafeteria, I would like to inform the food
service people that the correct spelling for dessert is
D-E-S-S-E-R-T.
On their fancy new sign they have it spelled D-E-S-E-R-T.
Which we all know spells desert. Maybe it isn’t a mistake, their
Jello is a bit grainy,
I had a fantastic idea about the Blue Cards, Everytime we see
a violation why not call the Student Personnel Sei*vices Office.
Just think how many times a day you see soir.sone flicking
a cigarette butt on the floor, hammering nails in the wall,
shooting suite mates, etc.
I absolutely refuse to turn this into a gossip column. I will
not print anything about a professor using the wrong rest room
at a certain new theatre at a new shopping center in town. I
don’t run that kind of column.
♦*»*»♦****
Oh yeah, to the cafeteria people again. Thank is spelled
with an “N.” T-H-N-A-K.
What if they gave a party and no one shows up?
It happened here. The Laurinburg Chamber of Commerce
gave a party for us and no one showed up.
The band cost about $100 an hour.
I cost less, and when I sing I guarantee no one will show
up. And it doesn’t cost as much that way.
Maybe I shouldn’t have fixed the air conditioning.
I think 1 will turn the little knob back and wait for main
tainance to fix it. Wonder what air conditioning feels like in
January? Have a feeling I’ll find out.
Don’t think that the only thing I can do well is complain
There are times when I really like something.
I loved the Christmas chapel of 1969.
Don’t call Student Personnel Services. (I remember them
when they were called Student Affairs and I kept applying
with no affairs given.) They have an unlisted number
Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor .
Assistant Editor .
Sports Editor
Business Manager
Advisor
THE LANCE
THURSDAY, SEPT. 9jq7i
Some Foresight Is Needed
By Senate And Leaders
BY JEFF NEILL
During the spring of each
year a group of self-nominated
students contest for elected of
fices. Last spring the contest
ing for elected positions did
not amount to much. Perhaps it
was a reflection of the apathy
that prevailed among us at the
time, a sign of our inability or
unwillingness to live outside
of the present and near future.
But our preference to live day
by day does not mean the ex
ternal forces about us practice
the same. It merely means we
drift aimlessly as a community
until a situation arises that we
must react to.
Last year when there was a
building interest in some quar-
ters to limit 24-hour open
dorms, the Senate and Ken Wat
kins acted realistically and ef
fectively to minimize the num
ber of closed hours.
But, as a community, can we
afford to continue in this way?
Should not some effort be tak
en by the Senate and especially
by Ken Watkins to co-ordinate
the various aspects of student
Interests and influence and be
gin planning a direction In which
to move?
For examples: In conside
ration of the general opinion
toward the new food service
perhaps Ken should file a re
quest, through the Red Cross
to Korea for CARE packages.
Should the request be denied
it might be feasible to esta
blish a vending machine snack
bar modeled after the one at
Davidson. At Davidson a variety
of machines with cofee, hot and
of machines with coffee, hot and
cold sandwiches, ice cream and
desserts is open 24 hours. This
allows not only for an alter
native to cafeteria food but also
a convenient place for late night
studiers to fill up. Profits of
course will go to the Student
Association.
Academically there are two
possibilities that stand out.
First, the grading of P. e_
courses could be on a Pass-
Fail basis. Secondly, a proce
dure could be formed by which
students would evaluate the fa
culty members and courses they
had each semester. A pamphlet
of the compiled opinions could
then be distributed to help stu-
dents select professors and
courses for the next semester.
Whether or not these few
Ideas are accepted and put forth
along with others Is ultimately
the responsibility of Ken and
the Senate. At present we can
only wait and look for indica
tions of which way we are mov-
ing.
News Analysis
On The Nixon China Plan
BY MARSHALL GRAVELY
Perhaps the most significant
foreign policy development dur
ing the summer of this year was
P resident Nixon’s announce
ment of his plan to visit the
People’s Republic of China, on
invitation of its Premier, Chou-
en-Lal. The country was stun
ned by this announcement, and
the speculation on the effects it
will have is only beginning.
There are a numl)er of ques
tions about its implications that
will be answered only later af
ter the trip. Any speculation,
however, is valuable if only to
alert the public to some of these
questions.
The biggest question is the
reason why China decided to
invite Mr, Nixon to visit. It
has been Isolated from the U.S.
since 1949, and considerable
hostility has grown up during the
Cold War period. The key to
America's Asia policy has
been the containment of the
much - feared Chinese expan
sion. This fear was one of the
chief reasons for our involve
ment In Southeast Asia. Now,
apparently, a change has come
about in Chinese policy toward
the West which directly affects
our future in the Pacific. The
Chinese leaders have decided to
attempt a normalization of re
lations, but their reasoning is
unclear.
Several suggestions can be
made as to their logic. It could
be that the revolution in China
has died out and that it Is
attempting to take a place as
a world power among the other
nations. The move could also
be economic, made to increase
foreign trade and challenge
Japan for complete domination
of Asia. Or, it could simply
be a move to hasten the U.S.
withdrawal from the Pacific
and especially Vietnam.
One great hope for Mr.
Nixon’s visit Is that it will lead
to some progress on the Viet
nam Issue. China is in a posi
tion to act as a mediator be
tween the U.S. and North Viet
nam on the prisoner issue and on
a final settlement, if one can
be reached, of the Indochina
debacle. Whether this is a pur
pose of the invitation can only
be guessed at.
Another gain that could be
made from this detente with
mainland China would be its ad
mission to the United Nations,
Representation in the UN would
make the needs of China and its
opinions of world issues more
easily known. This move would
also make the UN a more
credible body, since the
People's Republic has more
than 1/4 of the world’s popula
tion as its citizens.
One serious block to the ad
mission of China to the UN is
the present U.S. “two-China"
policy. Although the State De
partment announced that the
U.S. would support the admis
sion of the People’s Republic
when It next came to a vote,
we also continue to support Na
tionalist China (Taiwan). If Pre
mier Chou and Mr. Nixon can
reach a solution to this pro
blem through discussion, the
way will be clear for China’s
admission.
Thus it is that Mr, Nixon’s
announcement ofhls plan to visit
China raises both questions and
hopes. These Issues can be re-
solved by negotiation, and,
hopefully, they will be.
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