North Carolina Newspapers

    Published by Elizabeth City State College for Students and Alumni
VOLUME 27
ELIZABETH CITY, N. C., MARCH, 1966
Brown, Dixon, Trotman
Make 4.00 Averages
At the end of the Fall Semester only 108 of our 1,010 stu
dents made the Honor Roll, and only 19 made the Dean’s List.
The COMPASS is' proud to announce the names of those sut-
dents who have been academically successful. Leading the
scholars are three seniors, all of whom have an average of 4.00.
They are Joseph Brown, Evelyn Dixon, and Sandra Trotman.
Jackson Returns For
Fine Arts Festival
Dean’s List
Freshmen
Felton, Mae
Johnson, Yvonne
Leary, Barbara
Moore, John N.
Robinson, Margo
Sophomores
Brinkley, Joyce
Kinney, Lillie
luniors
Boone, Betty
Williams, Jethro
Seniors
Brown, Joseph
Dilday, Barbara
Dixon, Evelyn
Hamlett, Andrew
Mumford, Roben
Perry, Portia
Porter, Della
Powell, Melvin
Smith, Mary
Trotman, Sandra
Average
3.86
3.56
3.68
3.60
3.63
3.50
3.56
3.50
3.50
4.00
3.65
4.00
3.65
3.63
3.82
3.65
3.80
3.50
4.00
Honor RoH
Freshmen
Alston, Ervin
Billups, Barbara
Dickens, Charles
Faison, Johnnie
Felton, Henry
Foster, Ruby
Hargrove, Edna
Hawkins, Wilbert
Hicks, June
Lancaster, Robert
Lyons, James
Montague, Mariea
Pearson, Brenda
Pender, Betty
Quinlan, Terry
Scott, Georgia
Vaughan, James
Ward, Mary
Williams, Rosenna
Sophomores
Average
Barnes, Elsie
Brown, Rudolph
Chapman, Avon
Curry, Joan
Deloatch, Frances
3.12
3.13
3.00
3.00
3.06
3.07
3.06
3.29
3.43
3.28
3.00
3.07
3.28
3.00
3.12
3.46
3.00
3.00
3.00
Average
3.00
3.22
3.00
3.00
3.44
The College is especially
honored to have one of its grad
uates as a participant in the Ly
ceum Series, which is sponsor
ing the Gra-Y Revue in coopera
tion with the 1966 Fine Arts
Festival Committee.
The 4th Annual Dance Revue
of the Liberty Park Gra-Y Club
of Norfolk will be presented as
one of the concluding programs
on Sunday., April 24 at 2:30 p.m.
in Moore Hall Auditorium.
The director and creator of
this dance revue, G. Morgan
Jackson, is a 1962 graduate of
Elizabeth City State College.
He was a member of the College
Dance Group while at the insti
tution. His several performances
were many times rated as out
standing.
Mr. Jackson’s dedication to
community service and his out
standing record as a teacher
won him the "Teacher of -the
(Conf d on page 6)
Lt. Governor Scott
Recites College History
The Lt. Governor of North Carolina, the Honorable Robert W.
Scott, speaking in Moore Hall Auditorium, on Founder’s Day, told
the audience, "You have at this fine institution not only a tradi
tion to uphold-butjyou have an opportunity, you have a challenge
and you have a responsibility to help build a better North Carolina,
because it is here that you mold and shape the fundamental pattern
of tomorrow, as you mold the human mind of today...’’
Lt. Governor Scott was principal speaker at Founder’s Day,
celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the College
An impressive academic pro
cession across the campus to
Moore Hall led by President
Walter N. Ridley and the Lt.
Governor opened the 3:30 p.m.
program.
The Lt. Governor’s address
began with vivid word picture of
» session of the North Carolina
Legislature as it might have
been in 1891, when Hugh Cale,
the Negro legislator of Pasquo
tank County, submitted the bill
to establish a normal school
for the colored race in Elizabeth
City.”
Another highlight of the af
ternoon program was the presen
ce of two of the College’s first
students. Miss Isabella Hollo-
well of Elizabeth City, a mem
ber of the first class, Who en-
te(ed the school in 1892, and
the Reverend Mr. Milton M. Wes
ton, an Episcopal minister of
Tarboro, North Carolina, who
was among the first graduates
of the college. The opening
scripture was read by Rev. Wes
ton.
Speaking of the progress of
the college over the past 75
years, Scott said he was quite
{Cont'd on page 6)
Career Day
Attended
Nine students from the Soc
ial Science Departnj^nt with
their chairman, Dr. B. V. Sub-
biah, were guests at Norfolk
State College’s annual Sociology
Career Day; held at Norfolk
State College, Norfolk, Virginia,
Saturday, February 19, 1966-
The students were: Melvin
Powell, Lawrence Brown, Jesse
Powell, Thomasine Daughtery,
Solomon Graham, Leevon Lans-
den, Shelley Willingham, Leon
ard Moore, and Marilyn Bryant.
The program was designed to
acquaint students who are in
terested in the social services
as a career, with the many areas
of that field that are now open
to them.
The guest speaker was Dr.
Kalif who is director of the Rich
mond School of Social Wo^k,
Richmond, Virginia.
The students also attended
workshops where such profess
ionals as Probation Officers,
Community Action Program lead
ers and ^ciologists served as
consultants.
resident Speaks
at Seminar
Dr. Walter N. Ridley was one
of the group leaders and con
sultants, and a speaker at the
Equal Opportunity Seminar at
King’s Inn, Greensboro, March
16 and 17.
His topic at the Thursday
morning seminar was "The
American Negro - Past and Pre
sent.’’
The seminar was sponsored
by the Internal Revenue Service,
Southern Region, Greensboro
District, for the purpose of help
ing supervisors gain a greater
knowledge and understanding of
race and human relations...and
to assist supervisors in identi
fying and fulfilling their per
sonal obligations and respon
sibilities in carrying out the
Equal Opportunity Program.
Compass Staff
Members
Attend CSPA
Five members of the COM
PASS staff attended the 42nd
Annual Convention of the Col
umbia Scholastic Press Asso
ciation (CSPA), March 10-12.
The convention was held at Col
umbia University, New York
City.
Delegates to the convention
were Jethro Williams, ediror-
in-chief; Barbara Fearing, asso
ciate editor (both of Elizabeth
City); Ingrid East, secretary, of
Newport News, Va.; Avon Chap
man, sports editor, of New Bern,
and Terry Quinlan, reporter, of
Westbrook, Maine. Mr. L. R.
Ballou, advisor to the COM
PASS, accompanied the group.
Andrea Robison, president
of the College-Universitv Divi
sion of CSPA, presided over the
convention. She is a ■senior at
Millersville State College, Mill
ersville. Pa.
Sectional meetings were con
ducted during the convention,
some of which were conducted
by professional journalist and
others by atudents in attendance
COMPASS staff members led a
discussion on "layout and head
(Cont’d on page 2)
G.MORGAN JACKSON
Week’’ award presented by a
Norfolk radio station last year.
Under his leadership, the
Liberty Park Gra-Y Club has
won wide acclaim from the press
and the appearance of school
authorities and community work
ers in Norfolk.
Branton to
Highlight
Honors Night
Wiley A. Branton, special as
sistant to the Attorney General
of the United States, will be the
Honor’s Night speaker at Eliza
beth City State College, Wed
nesday, April 6, Thomas L.
Caldwell, Honor’s Night Commit
tee Chairman announced.
Mr. Branton will speak in
Moore Hall Auditorium ar 8 p. m.
During this annual program, spe
cial recognition in the form of
special awards and prizes are
presented to students jvho have
attained high academic averages,
or have displayed exempliary
character traits and leadership
ability.
Mr. Branton, a lawyer by pro
fession, has had considerable
experience in various aspects
bf civil rights activities, and
has received numerous citations
and awards for his effort in this
area.
He is a native of Pine Bluff,
Arkansas, and a graduate of the
University of Arkansas. He prac
ticed law in Pine Bluff from
1952 until 1962. During that time
he achieved national prominence
as Chief Counsel for the Negro
plaintiffs in the , Little Rock
school case.
He ^has served as Director of
the Voter Education project of
the Southern Regional Council in
Atlanta, Georgia, and was ex
ecutive Director of the Council
for United Civil Rights Leader
ship and the Committee for Wel
fare, Education, and Legal De
fense, Inc.
Mr. branton has also served
as Executive Secretary of the
President’s Council on Equal
Opportunity, established by Ex
ecutive Order of President John
son on February 5i 1965 and
chaired by the Vice-President.
Its responsibility was the coor
dination of the Federal Govern
ment in the field of civil rights.
The public is invited to at
tend.
NUMBER 8
Dr. C. K. Wang
Has Work
Published
Dr. Chi-Kao Wang, professor
of social science received word
recently that an article he wrote
last suouner concerning Dr. Sun
Yat Sen, founder of the Repub
lic of China, was published on
November 12, 1965. the one-hun
dredth anniversary of Dr. Sun’s
birth.
The article of some 30,000
Chinese words entitled-"Teach-
ings of Dr. Sun Yat Sen and
Montesquieu’s "The Spirit of
the Law’’ was written by Dr.
Wang on the invitation of Dr.
Chia Luen Lo, president of the
Academia Historica and chair
man of the Committee for the
Centennial celebration of the
DR. C. K. WANG
birth of Dr. Sun, published in
Taipei, Taiwan.
A piece of serious, scholarly
work, it is published in Volume
V, one of five large volumes
written especially for the occa
sion by 166 academic people,
and followers of Dr. Sun or be
lievers of his doctrines.
Speaking of the publication
of his work. Dr. Wang, a modest
and retiring gentleman said,
"On my oart, the publication of
(Cont’d on page 2)
Dance Band
Organized
Under die direction of David
W. Williams, College Band Di
rector, a dance band has been
organized on campus. The group
is known as the "ECSC Col
legians”.
The organization consifltl of
17 pieces. It plays a repertoire
of standard and popular arrange-
meoLS.
Performances arc restricted
to weekend engagements and re*
quests {or performances are
made to the director.
Members of the band must
maintain a "C” average and an
overall average of 2.5 in their
majors.
The band is open to all stu
dents who qualify. Interested
persons are subject to audition
by the director.
The "ECSC Collegians” have
performed once before the col*
lege family. Shortly after organ*
izing, the group played at ■
home basketball game.
    

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