North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE SIX
THE COMPASS
MAY, 1967
1967 Summer Session
Elizabeth City State College
Six"Week Session " June 13 ” July 22
Three“Week Session "
July 24 - August 11
Regular College Courses!
Workshops! Graduate Courses!
Number Hours Credit
ART
Arts & Crafts 225 2
BIOLOGY
Biological Science I39 3
BUSINESS
Business Mathematics 206 3
Elementary Accounting 316 3
EDUCATION
Foundations 201 3
She Secondary School ,313 3
Philosophy of Education 409 3
ENGLISH
Reading & Composition 101 3
Reading & Composition 102 3
World Literature 202 3
Advanced Composition 227 3
Children’s Literature 3I9 3
GEOGRAPHY
Introduction to Geography 201 3
Regional Geography 204 3
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Principles, Prac., & Proc 269 3
HISTORY
World Civilization 147 3
World Civilization 148 3
American History 255 3
American History 256 3
LIBRARY SCIENCE
Introduction of
Reference Materials 301 2
School Library Service 402 3
MATHEMATICS
Modem Basic Mathematics 101 3
Modem Basic Mathematics 102 3
MUSIC
Introduction to Music
Literature 121 2
PSYCHOLOGY
General Psychology 212 3
Psychology of Child
Development 307 3
Psychology of Adolescent
Development 308 3
Educational Psychology 309 3
POLITICAL SCIENCE
American Government 301 3
PHYSICS
Physical Science Survey 138 3
ECONOMICS
Principles of Economics, I .301 3
THREE-WEEK SESSION
Educational Psychology 309 3
American History 256 3
Modern Basic Mathematics 102 3
Psychology of Adolescent
Development 308 ^
Foundations 201 3
(All Courses Offered Subject to Sufficient Demand)
WORKSHOPS for TEACHERS AND STUDENTS (June 12-July 21)
ART IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
Designed to acquaint the public school teacher with methods
and techniques of teaching art, art education and the crafts on the
elementary and secondary levels. (6 credit hours)
LANGUAGE ARTS WORKSHOPS
Designed for the teacher who wishes to study the more current
attitudes, approaches, materials, and practices as they relate to
the teaching of the language arts. The principle of the inter-rela-
tedness of the language arts will be used as a focal point from
which listening, speaking, reading, writing and studying will be
viewed: and the concept of self-realization through the language
arts will be stressed. (6 credit hours)
PLAY PRODUCTION WORKSHOP
A practical demonstration course, covering every phase of ama
teur dramatics-directing, acting, make-up; costumes, scenery,
properties, lighting, and sound-effects. Step by step, froit the
selection of the play to the finished performance, almost every
problem faced by the amateur in staging a play will be discussed,
demonstrated, and made practical in the workshop sessions. (6
credit hours)
AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION
FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS
Planned for the new, future, and experienced teachers in the
elementary and secondary schools. Attention will be given to the
HONORS NIGHT
(Cont'd from page 5)
Edna F. Brown, the "Richard
S. Smith Biology Award” given
to Leo McNeil and the **Physical
Education Honor Plaque” given
to Willie N. Lamb.
Received by Barbara C. Fear
ing and Butler Sharpe III on Hon
ors Night was the "Publications
Award.” They received the honor
of having their names engraved
upon the Publications Honor
Plaque. To that student judged
to have made the most outstand
ing contribution to our Compass,
the"E.M. Spellman Cash Award”
was given. This award went to
Ingrid Y. East.
Dr. Ridley announced proudly
that Evelyn Dixon, one of our
honor graduates of 1966, had
established another award to be
given next year to that college
junior who had attained the high
est grades in her major field,
mathematics. Presented to Mag
nolia Brown was the Science
Club Honor Trophy. More re
cipients of certificates on Honors
Night were the twenty-two who
were listed in Who’s Who Among
Students In American Colleges
and Universities for 66-67.
Honors night was climaxed
with an eagerly anticipated an
nouncement. Presented annually
to the residence unit of the col
lege that maintains the highest
scholarship average is the Junius
W. Davis, Sr. Scholarship Award
Cup. After having remained in
Doles Hall for three years, this
cup was presented to West Lodge,
whose residents had attained a
3.24 scholastic average.
In the true sense of the word
the complete Honors Night Pro
gram was inspiring. The speak
er’s message moved all of us to
set higher goals for ourselves
that we may too become the hon-
orees to receive honors.
Graduates,
The past is behind
you. Use the present
to further prepare for
your future.
Outstanding
Student
^ C. Ashe
A very outstanding student in
in this month’s issue is the hard
working, dedicated Celestine
Ashe, daughter of Mr. & Mrs.
Robert L. Ashe, Littleton, North
Carolina, and a graduate of
McIverHigh.
Now in her Junior year here
at ECSC, Celestine is greatly
noted for her leadership ability.
She is Acting President of the
Lighthouse, vice-president of
Thalia Sorosis Club, Sectejary
of WGA, Assistant Supt. of Sun
day School, Chairman of Forum
Committee, Junior Counselor
(spokesman), and a nominee to
Who’s Who Among American
Colleges and Universities, 1967.
Celestine is a Social Science
major who has achieved a three
time honor roll recognition. Her
goal is to become a Social Work
er and eventually a Foreign Mis
sionary.
BOOSTER PROGRAM
(Cont'd from page I)
were 19 men and 51 women with
three from out of state (same
localities).
Persona lities
Mrs. Franklin was fulsome in
her praise of faculty-staff mem
bers who conducted the opera
tions of the Booster Programs.
She felt that their efforts con
tributed significantly to the suc-
need for audio-visual aids and the manner in which audio-visual
education can supplement any area in the teaching world. Teachers
will be taught to operate and repair the latest equipment. (6 credit
hours)
GRADUATE COURSES
Graduate courses will be offered on our campus this summer
through arrangement with East Carolina College, Greenville, N. C.
Courses of special interest to teachers will be stressed.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE:
DIRECTOR OF SUMMER SCHOOL
ELIZABETH CITY STATE COLLEGE
ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 27909
Omegas Present
Whittier
VTitherspoon
"Happiness consists in mak
ing the most of yourself...”, said
Whittier C. Witherspoon as he
spoke to the All College Assem
bly. His topic was "The Making
of a Scholar”. Lambda Gamma
Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fra
ternity presented Mr. Witherspoon
for their National Achievement
Program.
“To be a scholar one must
develop a desire of love and ser
vice for man”, said Mr. Wither
spoon. We as students therefore,
must "do something with all of
our emotional drives—direct
these drives into productive
channels”. For instance, the
speaker said if curiosity is right
ly used it will lead to a thirst
for knowledge. Fear is the result
of excessiveness of the detri
mental. Combativeness, he said,
is necessary for the advancement
of intellectual height. Sensitivity
leads to creativity and happiness.
It as well yields the individual
a more genuine ability for eval
uating and examining the world
around him. Mr. Witherspoon
quoted a man thusly, "It just
beats me, a Ph.D., and unable
to solve my own problems.” The
spice of the speaker’s message
is packaged in this portion of
his quotation from one of man
kind’s greatest scholars, Socra
tes, "...the unexamined of life
is not worth living.”
The Omegas concluded their
assembly with a review of the
fraternity’s four principles which
are: Manhood, Scholarship, Uplift,
and Perserverance.
cess of the venture.
She gave special credit to
several faculty-staff members for
their work, including Dr. T. H.
Anderson, Mr. T. L. Caldwell,
Mrs. Algurnia Murry of C. S.
Brown High School, Messrs.
Sims, W'ashington, and Alfred L.
Weston (the latter from Union
Kempsville High School, Nor
folk), and Mesdames Spellman
and Thomas.
Messrs. John W. Jordan and
Leonard A. Slade (Both Class of
'63, With Honor) were included
in Professor Franklin’s commen
dations.
Students also were praised for
their work in the Booster pro
grams. Mrs. Franklin mentioned
them as having excelled with the
tutorial and counseling phases
of the programs. Of the Class of
1966, Carol Ashe, Barbara Dildy,
Evelyn Dixon (all, graduates
With Honor) and Wallace Riggins
were cited. Also cited was Ken
neth McLaurin ('65 With Honor).
Mrs. iFranklin is the wife of
Dr. Carl M. Franklin, professor
of business on leave at the At
lanta University Graduate School
of Business Administration du
ring 1966-1967.
THE COMPASS
Volume 28 No. 7 May, 1967
Elizabeth City State College
Elizabeth City, North Carolina 27909
U. S. Postage
Non-Profit Organization
PAID
Elizabeth City, N.C.
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