North Carolina Newspapers

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Volunteering Can
Be A Rewarding
Experience
Spring into volunteering! We’ve got the
volunteer opportunity for you!! Don t delay,
give the Voluntary Action Center a cail TO
DAY! (724-7474).
American Cancer Society will need
volunteers to work in residential areas dur
ing the week of April 26 - May 1. Volunteers
will go door to door promoting community
awareness of breast cancer. The hours will
be between 12-6 p.m.
Boy Scouts of America will be opening a
uniform collection and distribution center in
the Experiment in Self-Reliance office. Two
volunteers are needed to staff the center on
Saturdays from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Forsyth County Health Department is
looking for adult male volunteers to serve
as group facilitators with teenage males
dealing with topics such as decision
making, self-esteem, sexual responsibility
and related matters. The program is called
MANTALK. The group meets on Mondays
and Fridays from 4;30 to 6:50. A one year
committment is asked.
Nature Science Center would like one
volunteer to be a teaching assistant for the
weekly “Discovery Hour” for grades K-2.
The class is held every Wednesday from
3:30 - 5:00 p.m. This is an excellent oppor
tunity for high school students and retired
persons.
North Carolina Baptist Retirement
Homes is in need of five volunteers to
transport nursing care residents to dining
room. The days are Monday-Friday, 11:45
a.m. -1:30 p.m.
United Negro College Fund is in need of
an Office Clerk. You will be making phone
calls to update corporate listing. This posi
tion will last one week or until it is com
pleted.
Veterans Administration Outpatient
Clinic is in need of full or part time help to
answer telephones in the Pharmacy and
also as patient escorts in the Medical Ad
ministration Service. The hours are from
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday.
Lunch will be provided for volunteers.
Rural Hall/Stanleyville Branch Library
wants to provide square or round dancing
classes for retired persons in the communi
ty. A teacher is needed. The hours needed
are early afternoon and the day is
negotiable. The classes should last four to
six sessions.
Housing Needed
For WSSU Students
Winston-Salem State University has
established an Off-Campus Housing Pro
gram to coordinate listings for its students.
Landlords, agencies or families can list
their accommodations — rooms, apart
ments or houses — and students can choose
the type of accommodations that will meet
their needs.
The program stems from a continuing in
crease in requests for campus housing, re
quests that now far exceed the number of
beds available. Pesons interested in listing
available space should contact the Housing
Office at 761-2237 or 761-2239 between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. weekdays. There is no listing fee.
SGA Holds Spring
Leadership Seminar
By Shelton Bullard
The 1987 Spring Leadership Seminar,
sponsored by the Student Government
Association was held March 7, 1987.
The seminar was geared toward those
who wished to run for an office next
semeter, but anyone was welcome to at
tend.
The seminar was composed of counselors
that spoke on leadership, time manage
ment, how to utilize one’s time, student
apathy, student motivation and campus in
volvement.
The counselors inspired the students to
meet and face all of their challenges with a
positive aspect. They also encourged our
future leaders to stand for what they feel is
right and to be the best that they could by
getting more involved in activities on cam
pus.
Issac Hayes
Makes a Comeback
By Shelia Rucker
This Issac Hayes was not dressed in his
well-known furs or chains speaking at A&T
State University at Merrick Hall, March 4,
at 1:30 p.m. Instead he was clad in blue
jeans, a Columbia Jazz T-shirt, red boots
and a red leather and blue jean jacket.
Hayes, a recording artist, producer and
actor, was speaking to A&T students about
opportunities in the music field. He spoke
about the field of business and how the
students could use this field in areas such as
marketing, sales and accounting.
He emphasized that it is extremely impor
tant that they be knowledgable in different
areas. “No one is going to give you
anything, you must earn it,” he said. He
also stated that the music industry is a very
stressful, glamorous and high-profiled
business, but warned students of using
drugs to help relieve that stress.
Hayes, a native of Memphis, Tennessee,
started as a signed musician who sang
“everything from blues to gospel and rock
n’ roll to jazz.” He was dubbed the “Black
Moses” at a performance in the late 60’s,
which he explained was “not a self-ordained
concept.” For this reason he was hesitant of
the name because he felt it was
sacrilegious. Nevertheless the name stuck
and he believes that black people felt that he
was a voice for the black life-style. Hayes
biggest hits came from the album “Hot But
tered Soul,” which included “Walk On By,”
“I Stand Accused,” “Phoenix” and “One
Woman.”
“My songs have helped put quarreling
lovers back together, helped the Vietnam
Vets and helped some people get through
lonely nights,” stated Hayes.
Hayes who received an Academy Award
for the music score of “Shaft.” has perform
ed in movies such as “Three Tough Guys”
and “Truck Turner.” His latest effort is the
upcoming movie “Counterforce,” in which
he plays a commando team member who is
protecting an Arab leader in exile. He has
written the music score for the action-
adventure movie.
Hayes' advice to students pursuing a
career in the entertainment field is to “have
tenacity" and not to lose sight of their goals.
Poet’s Corner
Meditation
It attacks not only losers, but winners —
Not only saints, but sinners.
Although you can’t see
How tall it can be,
And though you can't touch.
You sure can wonder how wide and how
much.
It could be real big or small
And terribly bad for us all.
Your mind it could take
Your heart it may break.
Your soul it may enter
Like a cold breeze in winter.
— Muriel Peed
“Temptation”
Indiana Limestone
size 15” X 10”
(This poem is a response to an English
1300 assignment to describe one of the
pieces of art observed while on a visit to The
Salem Burke Art Gallery).
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Hanes
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