North Carolina Newspapers

    HELP SEND DELEGATES
TO DETROIT
Jlaroon anb #olb
BOOST OUR
ADVERTISERS
VOLUME IX.
ELON COLLEGE, N. C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER i, 1927.
NUMBER 14
Captain ^'^Red” Jones Kicks Winning
Tally To Defeat Lenoir-Rhyne
^‘Kid’' Bramier Blocks the Bears’ Try
For Extra Point Preventing
Tie G-ame.
ELON 7T-LENOIR-RHYNE 6
Thanksgiving Day brought Elonites
plenty of everything. The dining hall
brought us the turkey, and the foot
ball squad brought home the bacon.
The Fighting Cliristians met Lenoir-
Khyne for the first time on the gridiron
■and defeated them 7-6. Braimer and
Efird again were the shining lights of
the Elon defense, with Hardy, Smith
und McCauley close runners-up. Hodge
■flnd Jones played stellar ball for the
Lutherans.
Lenoir-Rhyne through powerful
drives kept the ball in Elon territory
iilmost the entire first half, but the
Christians exhibited such an im
penetrable defense when near their
;goal that the Bears found it impossible
to score. Early in the second half
Leno'ir pushed the ball to within a
few yards of the Elon goal but w^re
held for dow'ns by the stubborn resist-
■ance offered by the Christians. Smith,
•drawn back out of the line, punted to
his own 45 yard line where Hodge play
ing safety man nabbed the ball and
returned it through a broken field for
a touchdown. On the succeeding play
Branner broke through and blo’cked the
kick for the extra point which eventu
ally proved to be the play that won
the game. This seemingly awakened
new spirit and fight in the Christians,
as from this time on the ball was in
play in Lenoir territory all of the time.
After successive drives through the line
Elon placed the ball on the Bears’ 25
yard line when the third quarter ended.
Early in the last quarter Yorldevitz
•completed a pass to Ziegler who romp
ed across the last chalk mark for a
;BCore. Red Jones won the game by a
successful placement in the try for the
extra point. The remainder of the
;game witnessed a frantic aerial attack
(Continued on Page 4)
OS. IC. IlfflICK linEIIOS
fflEEIING OF COLLEGES
Elon's Second Year.
Dr. Thomas C. Amick left Monday,
T^ovember 28, for Jacksonville. Florida,
-to attend the thirty-second annual meet
ing of the Association of ^Colleges and
Secondary Schools of the Southern
jstates. Elon Colleges was admitted to'
nienibersliip in this association a yeai
-ago in its session at Jackson, Miss.,
where'Dr. Amick was also Elon’s repre
sentative. The association will con-
iinue in session until Friday afternoon
of this week. Many topics of great
interest to education in the South will
be discussed at this gathering. Before
Teturning to the college Dr. Amick will
visit points of interest in Florida,
particularly St. Augustine, Palm Beach,
T'ort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Miami.
Mr. G-eorge D. Colclough of the Busi
ness Manager’s office of the college is
to attend the eighth annual meeting
of the Association of University and
College Business Offices of the Eastern
States on Friday and Saturday of this
week. The session is to be held at
Charlottesville. Va., and those who at
tend will be the guests of the Uni
versity of Virginia.
President W. A. Harper is to attend
the Faculty Conference for the State of
Kentucky, held under the auspices of
the Y. M. C. A. at the State Teachers
College of Kentucky at Morehead from
:£Coai-taaiued on Page 4)
^ iiPii
HARVEY PRETLOW RAWLS
Suffolk, Virginia
Born May 27, 1927.
Registered at Elon College a few
days after birth.
This picture shows Harvey at the age
of five months and sixteen days.
Both the father and mother of this
boy are Alumni of Elon. Harvey’s
oldest sister, Ann, is now a freshman
here. Dr. and Mrs. Rawls have ONLY
eight children and it is their desire to
see all of them graduates of Elon.
Loyalty of this nature has made Elon
what it is and will keep it foremost
in the rank. Dr. and Mrs. Rawls say
their children are born to go to Elon.
FSCULiy NE«ELE CLOB HUIIE
PILGniMAIIDPUIIITIINPIIItTr
Mrs. Frances J. Ring, Hostess, Was
Aided by Misses Fisher and
Watson.
Last Tuesday evening Mrs, Frances
J. Ring was hostess to the Faculty
Nevele Club in a beautifully appointed
Pilgrim and Puritan Thanksgiving
party. The members of the club were
all dressed in costumes of various his
torical Pilgrim characters. A his
torical sketch of these famous charac
ters was given by Miss Lila Newman.
The guest of honor for the evening
was Mrs. Thomas F. Opie of Burling
ton, who not only, gave a sketch of her
visit throughout Europe this summer
but described many of the birth places
of our ancestors.
Amusing games were enjoyed by the
Pilgrims. After which the hostess, as
sisted by Misses Florence Fisher and
Anne Watson, served most delicious
Thanksgiving refreshments.
ELON MEN ARE PRmS
III ARMISTICE DAY PROGmiM
AT SOfFOLK, VIRGINIA
W. C. Hook, ’21, Delivers Inspiring and
Interesting Address Before a Large
Audience at St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church.
H. R. RICHARDSON, ’27, SPEAKS
We quote from tlie Suffolk News-
Herald; “'The Suffolk post of the
American Legion and the Woman’s
Auxiliary assembled at St. Paul’s Epis
copal church to hear an Armistice Day
message from the Rev. W. C. Hook,
pastor of the Holland Christian Church.
“The Legionnaires gathered in front
of the City Hall a few minutes before
the church service and with members
of the auxiliary marched in a bo'dy to
attend religious services which were
led byt the rector, the Rev. H. N. Tuck
er, after which Mr. Hook delivered a
stirring address in which he related the
outstanding events leading up to the
armistice and drew practical lessons
from the war and its aftermath, ex
tolling the nations that had saved the
world from imperialism.”
Among other things Rev. Mr. Hook
said: “The sweetest sound in all the
world is the so'und that hushes all the
harps and flutes of the angel in the
Glory Land and bids them lean and
listen—it is the din of broken shackles
falling from the opjjressed. A righteous
cause is the only excuse for war. When
war is precipitated by jealousy, hatred,
or selfishness, it is barbarous and can
not be too severely condemned. The
golden links that have motivated onr
nation have been RIGHTEOUSNESS,
INTELLIGENCE, and LIBERTY. The
three pre-eniinant powers that won the
war are; 1st. Brave manhood—the
flower of America; 2nd, Purified woman
hood, who’ sent the men off with smil
ing faces but bleeding hearts; 3rd.
Divine ideals, gained from the mastei
mind of the l^Tan of Galilee.”
A special Armistice Day program for
the scho'ol children was carried out in
the high school auditorium with Pro
fessor Howard Richardson making the
main address of the occasion. Pro
fessor Richardson is principal of the
Jefferson school in Suffolk.
Philologian Literary Society Stages
Annual Thanksgiving Entertainment
Thanksgiving day witnessed the pass
ing in a blaze of glory of one of Elon’s
mainstays in the line. E. W. McCauley,
better known to us as “Mac,” came
to Elon from Oak Ridge w’ith the
reputation of a steady and consistent
fighter in football. • “Mac” lived up to
predictions by breaking into the Chris
tian line-up right in the beginning as a
guard. During the succeeding year, he
proved his versatility by filling in a
hole at center. After having a success
ful season at center, “Ma-c” was elect
ed captain of the football team for the
ensuing' year of ’26. The current sea
son saw “Mac” back in his old posi
tion as guard; and. although badly
handicapped by a fractured hand, he
played throughout the season. On
Turkey Day “Mac” could have boast
ed that he had played in every game
since his arrival on “The Hill.”
OELEGATES TO STOOENT
CONFERENCE ARE GROSEN
TIAI” EIITERIAIN THE
SAT
‘Detroit or Bust” Is Their Motto
Now.
Elon College, Nov. 29.—The “Y.-W”
of Elon College entertained the Bur
lington Rotary Club at a most delight
ful dinner 6:30 Monday evening. The
dinner was given for purpose of en
abling the “ Y-W” to send a delegate to
Detroit, to the tenth quadrennial con
vention of the Student Volunteer Move
ment for Foreign Missions.
The dinner was given in the Y. W.
C. A. room of the Beautiful Christian
Education building which was donated
(Continued on Page 3)
Basketball Dope
Schedule to Appear in An Early Issue.
The echoes of the football season are
over on the campus at Elon, and the
call for the basketball candidates to as
semble to begin practice on December
1st is turning the attention of the col
lege students to the indoor sport.
Coach Walker, though he has had
very little opportunity to judge, says
that he feels sure there is good material
among the student body this year for
a cage team and that he expects to
have a quintet that will represent Elon
well. Altliough a few men liave occa
sionally gone into the gym for a work
out with the basket sphere, mostly
freshmen, no opportunity has been of
fered yet to judge what material there
is among the new men. However, sev
eral reputed “star” players on strong
high school teams are among the num
ber that expect to begin training next
Thursday afternoon.
Six letter men from last year’s team
are back on the hill this year. They
are “Tobe” Crutchfield, and Paul Cad-
dell, guards; Earl Sims and Vernon
Briggs, centers; Dan Newman and
Hoyle Efird, forwards. Three letter men
of last year’s squad are not back this
(Continued on Page 4)
Misses Jewel Truitt, Susie Elder
and Mr. Frank Alexander.
A Convention For The Purpose of Mak
ing Christ Known in The Mission
Fields.
Misses Jewel Truitt and Susie Elder
and Mr. Frank Alexander have been
chosen by the Religious Activities
Cabinet as Elon’s representatives to
the tenth quadriennial convention of
the Student Volunteer Band. This is
an \indenominational organization of
students in many parts of the world
who- have dedicated their lives to the
work of making Christ known in mis
sion fields. The convention is to be
held in Detroit, beginning December
28th and closing January 2nd. The re
action among the student body indi
cates that they approve of the choice
of delegates that; has been made, and
believe tlipt the delegates will uphold
the honor c.f p]lon College and help in
the great work of making the world
Christian.
ELON COLLEGE MIN
ISTERIAL ASSOCIATION
Thanksgiving is the Holiday Set
Aside for “Phi ' Home-Coming.
Program For Evening Was Well Rend
ered With Chandler, Walker, Mc
Neil and Hook in Outstanding Boles.
Tlianksgiving day, the Philologians'
festival, has come and gone. To many
people it was just another day that
has ebbed out and passed a.way, but
to the “Phis” and their host of
friends fond memories' will long refresh
their souls with pleasant thoughts of
this glad ho'me-coming day. On this
date, which has become an annual holi
day for the college, the Pliilologians
always entertain and welcome back a
great throng of old Phis, Alumni and
friends. Thursday, November 24, 1927,
was no exception to this rule.
Unique in practically every respect
was the program presented before a
great host of friends in Whitley Mem
orial Auditorium. Critics report that a
very high degree of perfection w^as evi
dent in the presentation as well as in
the interpretation of practically every
number. The program itself was of a
varied nature, involving all the finer
qualities a literary prograin may pos
sess with added features from programs
not purely literary.
Following the usual welcome address,
given by David Shepherd, a vocal
quartet was rendered by J. Paul Mc
Neill. C. C. Dollar, Jo-e French, and
E. F. Rhodes. Then Paul G. Hook
swayed the vast audience with his fine
oratory as he presented in a faultless
manner Van Dyke’s “The Lost Word.”
His interpretation of this number show
ed the results of real literaryr society
work, and is to be commended. E. F.
Rhodes followed this oration with a
beautiful cornet solo which delighted
the audience.
To give variety as well to change
the mood of the hearers, J. R. Walker
introduced a lot of smiles as well as
a goodly number of good old laughs
when he rendered a comical reading,
“Be Careful Si.’^ This number was
outstanding for two reasons. First,
because the reading itself was such as
to command the attention and interest
of all; second, because the performance
was in perfect harmony with the inter-
(Continued on Page 4'i
CAROLINA THEATRE ENTER
TAINS ENTIRE M.&G. STAFF
The Staff Takes This Opportunity of
Thanking Mr. George Stevens, Man
ager of Carolina Theatre For His
Elind Hospitality.
Since the habit of using profane
language is too common in this coun
try. and since the constant use of
God’s name in jokes or in anger
may lead onie to think lightly of re
ligious matters, the Elon College Min
isterial Association wishes to urge all
who may have the habit of cursing to
stop the use of words which are use
less to themselves, offensive to some
of their fellowmen, and disrespectful
to their great and eternal Friend.
Monday witnessed a very interesting
and pleasing event spent by the Maroon
and Gold staff at a theatre party at the
Carolina Theatre of Burlington. The
management of the Carolina Theatre,
in appreciation of the co-operative
spirit displayed by the Elon students
this year and in an effort to build up
even a greater spirit of interest and
co-operation between the students and
them, were hosts to the staff for the
evening.
Dr. W. A. Harper and Dean A. L.
Hook also co-operated by donating
their cars for transportatioTi. The en
tire staff with only a few exceptions
were guests, and all had an enjoyable
time. The staff wishes to take this
opportunity of thanking the Carolina
Theatre for the entertainment and Dr.
Harper and Dean Hook for their friend
ly interest in our behalf.
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view