North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
MAROON AND GOLD
SATUIiBAY, r,!ArvC^i ", 1333
Maroon and Gold
Edited and printed at Elon College
by students of Journalism. Pub
lished semi-monthly during the
college year.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Library News
FRANK DONOVAN
WESLEY HOLLAND
(JWEN TILLMANNS
MARY FRANCES WALKER
PEARL PRESTON PARIS
TOM FURNESS, JR.
THURMAN F. BOWERS
TOM PERRY
REBECCA HOLDEN
HAROLD HILBURN
EDWARD FARRINGTON
VAN BARROW
LOl’IS HUBBARD
JUNE LEATH
RICHARD DIVERS
LANDON WALKER
1937 Member 1938
Plssociated Golle6iale Press
National Advertising Service, Inc.
C*lUgt Fukiuktn k«pr«s*ntativ*
420 Madison Avi. Nkw York. N. Y.
Cmicam - •otTOii - Lo* UMLC» - Sam Fiamciko
Entered as second class matter
November 10, 1936, at the post-
office at Elon Coirege, N. C., under
act of March 3, 1879.
Girl’i, 'there’13 a certain prof
here wh'o will make la tfci'd father
some day. H« has been 'practicing
an .amortiher prof’s kid for qui'te a
while. Heaven help the lufky girl
wh>o gets him . . . We wish to of
fer our condolences a few of
oiur athletes who ame continually
chased by a centadn trio of girls
on th.if! ciaimij'us . . . Wionider why
.Jerry Haggiard wOTi’t break down
and tell uij all ah ut the life and
loveis of a isheeip herder. I bound
it would be interesting . . . First
it was Mastpo who ojntiniually
pliyed the piano in West Dorin.
Niw it is Joe Gol'ombek wih' nearly
drives us mertz. iDon’t you boys
realize that there is a Mosic Build
ing here and; that it would be
ea-iier on our eaus if you played
here but practiced over there?
This, iis no hint f tr you, Chiatrlie.
TIhat reminliii uis—we’d like Oo de
vote a ooupla pages to the slam
ming of pseudo-humorists on the
campu^!. Let it suffice to say
that a “Pee'.:dng Ttoim'’ is the low
est form . f animal life . . . Who
opened all the windows, in the au
ditorium Saturday?
Old boy Dam Cupid has been
woirking overtime here of late and
i:■!. doing an initeresting lk>t of pair
ing. The fi.^lowing cvoiuples have
been seen billiinig la^d cWoing in
various spots on and off the cam
pus :
Edith Brj-aint aind Hank Capil-
i lary.
Florence Reeves and Isiadah
Seal i.
Mary Bivens an'd Dick Cromlish.
Ellen Womble and J*oe Hilgreen.
Evelyn Hotoeis alnd Huink Brad
ley.
, Margaret Earp and “Murpliy”
Tulv;hjn.--ky.
Ned I>eaveris and Jue Paidgett.
I Maxine 'Hudgdnis and Mr. Mea-
cham.
MUSIC NOTES
The staff of Mar ,or and Gold
annouuijes with pleasure the addi
tion of eight new members to the
editorial staff. The names . f these
reophyte.s a;pear abave in tbe list
of edi'.icis.
“This Publishication”
s. me days ago, the MAROON
AND GOLD .-uiff was hon^ored
with ain anonymous “fan letter”.
An unenlig^h'.ened student wanted
to know the purp.J^e of “this pub-
lischiv'ation,” and, with this brief
exi>lana:io(n', we shall aittempt to
di.»pel all trace of doubt and mis
giving fri rm the mind of the ques
tioner.
There are several reasons why
the MAROON AND GOLD, as a
college "publ'jsc'hioation”, i« valu
able. One is that by taking the
co-uiiie in J-jumalisai, a student
may “get off” a whole year of
English, i*dth an eye to an English
major. Tihis, my mateiis a
(worthwhile endeaver.
Auv.ther purpvse of the paper is
to get ae many names into pjint
ite pot«ible. People like to see
their nameis in pr'i'nt; we are en-,
deawring to gratify siuch a deeire.
Perhaps their pride ia a little piqu
ed, when their names appear ia
“Snip and Snoop”. However, if
we don’t inctu.ae a gossip c,. lumai
in OUT paper, there is much ob
jection. If we do inulude it, there
is m'ore complaini. So what have
we to lose by putting it in? j
A third reaji^n f, r having the
japer, is thai: since other colleges
hAve a student neAH publiciaition,
why ah. uldn’t Elon? Never let
it be »a.d that Eion College is
left b.hi.'d in any .j.rection. Be-'
sides, h' a would we feel, if neigh
boring .'lieges !-ent in their news
papers, ask ng fi T exchanges, and i
we had t. wr le and tell tntm that
we didnV hav, i pa;er? j
I
Seric i ly, the college newspaper |
is a previeiA' of coming events, 1
f^rew'i '.11 ^ s-Luaen.s of future!
acti^•^ti‘''S. and .it al»o serves as a'
detoiled record of life cm the
camp. ■ 1
dent through its editor-
iials . I-
tion!. S. me utuden 'i may not
agree wl^lh the MAKOON AND
GOLD ix/licie-'. We -re so. rj
Editors, M.2Toon an'd Gold:
Banquet- are usually given in
'nor, :nri therefiire supposedly
fur the euijoymenit, of some one
individual >or group of individuals.
Furlhermoje, when one thinks of
i ■ tnoing la festive ^'o.asion, , ne
u'sually ajnticiflaltes and remembers
the time as one of the happier
nri.meniii of oampuis life. Cam the
event of an inierciaiss bilnquet on
the Elon campuii be claimed as
one jf these memorable and happy
occiasitns? The combination of
[the chance at some excellent food,
[ an opportunity lo be so>:iable, an.
ain evening’s alibi ftor miot study-
IS :iie only idea which at pres
ent differentiates this evening
ii\m any other.
The t, mi.Tr .Stee j who pla.Ti f'.r
the prepanatioaiK of these affairs
do not even hope for 100 cent
; . ■ e~ ...in.ce. iThii aware.-.ess oi
' those not going to attend dmubtles.c
has a dampening effect upon the
.1 mmittees’ effori.^. The commit-
,ets make the preparations iwith a
lesigned attitude of “Well, we’vt
done whiait we could, anyway”. But
the conwndttees are ncyt to be blam
ed for this .attitude. No matter
... w in pired the committees
ire, the gue i:s themselves lack
..le expji.’tancy, el.l.husia^m, and
spci.i'.aneiiy that mark a suocess-
-ul affair.
The main faitor th.at kills the
possibilities , f a isuiccessful bam-
.[•uet is the knowlekige, in most
-.1 es, that the individual will not
-e able to alttend the banqi^et with
the one pera in on the campu*^
whose presence at any affair
uid make that affair a major
.siicce s. Mi.xs,t of the guetits at
tend with an ther individuuJ oi
second, third, or uno preferenje,
i".d the coui.:le nee'is a 1-. t m i
flexibility in adapting to a situa-
-ion of a few hours’ duration thai
the iave;L.ge couple iu .itt i-
!aib,’e at an Elon banquet. Whik
;he lack i.'f flexibility iis to be ron-
mnt.i Jrii deplored, neve;';heles^
.here 'seems to be n'o indicatior
f a change amon^? Elon 8t•udent^
n regard to this matter.
Xow *he adimun'isitiiati'-on (isucl
1 bewildering term!) undoubted!
irends that the.se affairs shou!
ill one .'ould dircui-Ti. of in one
■ nde t drf.'im Tihfy really wa
J rive the students the besi c.
■verytihing ^ i-.-:-iblt‘. They have
:;e the’r attempt to do the nice
thing for the students and th’
u !?nts have behaved rather un-
ei'aciously toward getting the m;ift
of this ,pportuni"v—rejecting
t to variou's degree.'*—111 the .= if-
..tii;n poes .n. Each group, the
(('ontinued on page 4)
As A Knave Sees It
It was amiueing to L-ee the Fri
day nigiit cinema audience shift
With Bob Haimdlton. As 'fiarti.f his
iniJation, ...oie of hi? brothers
'i>iders to stick with the crowd.
Fro.m lall Bob did just
that in a big Aay. He boldly t.ok
a seat in the moit crowded part
of the aud.toTium. The audiience
t/egan to crane, one show miovedon,
Helen Scales uneezed loiialy, and
Alilared Ciaven demanded to kuiow
in no unceiuiin terms wh- had
been eating onion'3. Finally several
ra'As shifted and Bob, naving no
desire lor solitude, moved silently
with them. Eventually Mr. West,
leaiing drastic action aisked Bob to
.iqL'-'„uie hiJTJielf.
* * *
Countess Alexandira Ti.latoy’s
-fea^tm.nt >.f ner suojeot in “Ihe
Tragedy of Tolstoy” is one on faii-
iic_t, a reoucr feew tniat it is
-iip.ejuQiced. it appears that the
j^reatest irage.iiy •od Tols.toy’s life
vVa-i uliW^mpiatneJc wife. Such a
i:ubje;;t ~s a GcJicate one 10 be
nianuied by an impersonal bii.-
gnapher, an'd doubly diffivult for a
membur of the t«>miiy. It should
be remembered :n reading Miss
Tolstoy's book that loitv„y was a
genius and Counte&s Tolst.y, it
seenus, was not a very intelligent
w^umani. A bad combinacion, to put
it mildly. The bn^'ok iii extremely
readable and gives a human pic
ture of the gielat Russian writer.
* * *
“The House that Hitler Built” by
Stephen Roberts us an in^ctment
of the Nazrsi. The materia] was
gathered at fiffst hand. The Audi-
|jr was given exceptional lacilities,
amd) iwas aided in every way by
the Nlazifi. Under their supervis
ion, he d;elved into the beg^nriing
of the Hit»erj.^m, ajid traced it lo
its present r'-'Sitioa in tje..Ujany.
The resuk is a well-written and
ciompact book.
• « *
Left-overs: It is rumoffed that
Powersi has crganized legalized
murder in North Dorm in baseball
practice. Don’t be too ro'ugh on
em .... Is it true that our
head cnJach is toff on his honey
moon? Golly, th.s pn f.o^und
scribbliin'g hau suddenly taken a
nad “Snip and Snoop’s
.ei iitory. P.^rdon!
ALUMNI NEWS
ibort th.it, but we realize that
everyone cann'ot agree on every-
1 .1-1 iu , r;:'. An; A./y, u
iif« us fire to a. use e..' '.igh in-
‘.re.st among ‘he -tude.ite,
.hey will ra' e a lit.le fuss onct
in a whi!e!
On Saturday, F’ebrua.y 26, Mr.-.
J .'hn Robert Kemo'dle, cl'atfJS of
1936, was hion'ored at a tea, given
at the Alam.iiii.e H'Xel, Burling
ton, by Mr-!. Ge '^^e A. Kern dSe,
Mrs. George F. H.Kkney, ai.d M.ss
Lula Ann Kem'O.J!e. iMrs. Ker-
nodle was- M'..'^ Es.her Cole, be-
; le her ..carriage.
Among the ti> n girls who at
tended tiie affair Mere Melvin
'-.m!S Kut'n Pjge Cia.k, Virginia
Gonyt' , Gwen Tillmanna, and
C.iuue.l ’37.
Don Herold’s examination of
Mae West in March’s Scribner’s is
suiperb with diue re^peict Jo art
and all re.'ipeitability. He says:
“It delights me the way Mae
Weisit can get a great rise :f right
eous indignation out of a large
portion of the Aimerican populace
by the meo-e wave of a hip or the
knowing drag of a vowel.”
Mr. Her-'ld iis speaking of Mae
West’s nadiio progr'am with Charlie
McCarthy a few weeks ago which
caused such a furore. He con
tinues.
“I have grown to like Mae West
donsider'ably, just by I'oioking at
the kind i.f people who hate her.
Now, persoinally, I’d rather tura
Mae Wes't loob'e on my children
than Greta Garbo, Jnan Orawftord,
Loretta Young, and other movie
stalls who frequently p-Ttray se.x
and love as mopey, morbid, maud
lin, too imipiortant phaaes of life.
The wiorot thing that Mae West
implies is that sex is fun, and I
think it is. If anything, uhe buir-
lesques sex, which is a more
vi^holesome thing to dio thten to
snoop it.”
By Tom Perry
A few of itiuir would-be radiicals
on the caimpuB are requested to
read Mr. Herold’s icontinuation on
the same page entitled “ . . . and
r-adiciaW.
“Moait radicals I have met have
seemed to me to be activiated by
iwhiajt I would call an unexpected
lusih of premature first-geneiration
intelligence to the head, coupled
with a seizure ,.f perpetual, jittery,
school-girlish suspicions.
“They are hit all of a sudden by
the daw'in of intellect before they
are able to handle it and bedore
they have learned to waish behind
their eairs.
“Thety (are fascinated by certain
polysyllabic wwds which they
work tO' death, such as ddei.logy.
“Their toinigues aje imwre facile
than their minds, and their minds
are more facile than their horse
sen'-ie.
“They are our nouveaux intelli
gent.”
In other words, dear readers,
each and eveiny one, Mr. Herold
really huis something.
The co'ncert by the University
of Michigan Little Symphony |
here proved to us one thing that 1
we have always strongly suspect-1
ed: that Americans can attain :
some degree of fame in the field i
;.f ciassiical music, and that for
eigners aren’t the only ones who
can wiave the baton over a sym-.
phony ori.hestra.
We hand to Mr. Thor Johnson,
the conductor, the acclaim which
he so well deserves, an-..ther
North Carolina boy who has made
good far from the land of his na
tivity. On the program of the
concert it was stated that Mr.
Johnson organized his first sym
phony at the tender age of four
teen years while in Winston-!
Salem, North Carolina. Later he
attended the University of North
Carolina at Chaipel Hill and was
director of a student chamber or
chestra while there, then went to
the University of Michigan as a
graduate student and member of
the faiculty after having been As
sistant Conductor of the North
Carolina Symphony. It seems that
since going to Michigan, Mr.
Johnson has been over in Europe
tj study in the lands of the mas
ters.
Learning that he attended the
University of Norch Carolina re
minded us that there are two
other boys who went to that school
who haven’t done so badly for
themfelies in the realm ^f musi
cal culture. Hal Kemp and Kay
Kayser were once numbered
among the itudents of that grand
old institution whic'h has started
so many young men up the ladder
of success.
As we think of these two fam
ous bands, we cannot help but
wonder which of the three 'or
ganizations is best known througih-
out the United States the Kemp,
Kayser, or Johnson outfits.
As w'e watched Thor Johnson
conducting the Little Symph.ny,
we could not help no’ticing that he
seemed to be a very good conduc
tor and very sure of himself and
his retinue of musicians. We
firmly believe that if his efforts
tra which would hold the public
favor longer than the celebrated
Paul Whiteman and his orchestra.
Hal Kemp and Kay Kayser
seem to have done pretty well for
themselves in that they are given
Open Forum
Editors, Ma.ro'on land Gold:
I still ciontend that if the fellows
are coming to the so-c)alled partiea
to sit 1:11 the steps, they should
stay away. Some people around
here .-eem to delight in the em-
barraishment of atheire. You boys
sit cm the steps, refulse to break,
and then if a fellow hias m,:re than
one nuimber with the aame girl
you’re just bubbling over with
“ir.iice” remarks abtoiut the girl.
Some of UIS may be glue but we
don’t like to be reminded of it by
wallflowers. And thiat’s exactly
what the stag line at Elon is com
posed of. G-irl’is hate to be w'atch-
ed and critized by people who can
do no better them'selves.
space on the networks by adver
tisers whv. do not make bad invest
ments. Besides being paid for
their regular broadcasts, these two
bands make personal appearances
all over the country and never
fail to play to crowded houses.
Of course, these two hoys had
to have training in classical music
to organize the snappy bands that
they have now, but this was only
a stepping stone which was in
cidental in the procuring of big
ger and better things.
This scribe frankly admits that
he can’t see the point in much of
the classical music, which we are
told by those better educated in
music and b.ok learning, is good
for the soul and intellect of man
kind. There are some pieces of
classical music "which we think
to be beautiful and soothing but
the most beiutiful by far is. the
“Blue Danube” waltz.
“The St. Louis Blues”, “Sleepy
Time Gal,” “The Waltz You Sav
ed for Me,” and many other old
tunes dio more to relieve the
weariness of our soul and the
nostalgia of this life and to fill
our heart with sweet memories
and pleasant thoughts than any
I of this stuff called classical mu-
j sic, aided by symphonic arrange
ments which would perhaps be
j beautiful if some tune and rythm
were instilled in them.
He Who Travels Far
Learns Much
Virginia Stage Lines
Charlottesville, Va.
f WELL, WMEH
XXJVE BE^N
SMOWM6 AS
tON6 AS I HAVE.
SON, YOU'LL
APPREOATE
TOBACCO LIKE
PR|N»CE ALBERT,
HOW ABOUT
“TQYINJG
PA.?
NO MATTER MOW
EXCITIMG 1 MAk:£
THE TT?Ip >OiJ
KfEVER STOP
SMOKIK4G
PIPE, 3UDGE -
MX) CBSTAtNILV
MUST EKOO/
THAT TOeACCO
VEF? SON ' I M
STILL WITH VOU
OPEN 'ER UP
AND LET^ SEE
MOW FAST THIS
BARGE CAN
VOU ALL
TWERE,
IN
FLORIDA
THATS PiGHT
PRINCE ALBERT
DCTRA-MtLD
BECAUSE OF THE
SPECIAL NO'BITE
PROCESS.
6EE. PRINCE
ALBERT DRAWS
GCXX>» IT^
COOL OKI THE
MOUTH
VOU ONM THANK
RA.'S CPIMP
CUT fOR THAT
rr ROCKS PlGMT
FOP COOL, SLO*/
BUPMIMG
MILD
VOUVL FIND
n RIGKT .
TASTV J
THERE ARE 1DT5 OF THINGS 0) SKIMP ON
BUT NOT ON MY TOBAOQO. PRINCE ALBERT
COSTS LITTLE ENOUGH, CONSIDERING HOW
MIIO IT SMOKES AND HOW GOOD IT1»n:K
SMOKE 20 FRAGRANT PIPEFULS of Prince Albert. If
you don’t find it th«- meliowebt, tastiest pipe to
bacco you ever smoked, return the pocket tin
«rith the rest of the tobacco in it to us at any
time within a month from this date, and we will
refund full purchase price, plus postage.
(Sizn^d) R. J. Reynolds Tob^rto Company,
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
l>opyrtinit. 1BS8. R. J. R«rn4df> Co.
pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in
every 2>oz. tin of Prince Albert
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view