North Carolina Newspapers

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ANNUAL ELON
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PAGE 23
100th ANNIVERSARY
OF HISTORIC DENTZEL
CAROUSEL
ELON STUDENT
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PAGE 13
PAGE 13 VIDEO AND
SLIDESHOW ONLINE
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LON, NORTH CAROLINA | WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2010 1 VOL«itfWCj3:6.>E'Ig,4*HON .22
www.elon.edu/pendulum
3LAMM! snakes up
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More than simply a component of a song, on Sept. 16
drums and drumming were the centers of attention in
McCrary Theatre.
A sold-out show featured drumming icon Carmme
Appice and six fellow musicians — five drummers and
a guitarist — who transformed the space into a chair-
rattling, bone-quaking box of sound.
PHOTOS TAKEN BY COREY GROOM AND Tf=lACY RAETZ
The show included many drum solos, guitar riffs
and a guest appearance from the Fire of the Carolinas
drumline. Emblazoned with fluorescent tape and
glowing in blacklights, the performers imbued the
stage with considerable energy.
See page 19 for the full story on SLAMM!
Student arrested
on rape charge
Anna Johnson
Managing Editor
An Elon University freshman was arrested and
charged with one count of second-degree rape Sept. 17.
The student, Nicholas Pacella, was taken to the Alamance
County Jail and held under $100,000 secured bond.
Pacella posted bond Monday morning, Sept. 20.
The arrest derived from an alleged rape that took
place sometime between 1 and 2:15 a.m. Sept. 12 in
Smith Residence Hall, according to a Campus Safety and
Police incident report. A student, other than the victim,
reported the incident, said Chuck Cantos, director of
Campus Safety and Police.
The victim knew the suspect before the incident and
alcohol is believed to have been a factor, according to the
incident report.
According to North Carolina statutory law and Elon
University’s Honor Code, a person cannot give legal
consent for sexual activity after consuming alcohol.
A notice was not sent to the student body in this
particular incident, or with any sexual assault case
where the victim does not give explicit permission, said
Smith Jackson, vice president and dean ol Student Life.
“We do want to notify the campus of sexual assaults
because we want people to know this does happen and
there are resources,” Jackson said. “But never at the
expense of the victim.”
After this type of event, the student is the main
priority, Jackson said.
“The first thing is a focus on the student,” he said.
“To see if they want to go to the hospital, do they want
the police involved, do they want us to make a report on
their behalf, do they want us to go through judicial."
Victims of sexual violence are given a number of
routes to pursue the matter further, said Leigh-Anne
Royster, coordinator for personal health programs and
community well-being.
Students can choose to file a report through both
the North Carolina legal system and Elon University’s
Judicial Affairs, only one of those legislative bodies or
neither.
“The criminal justice process is very different from
the campus judicial process,” Royster said. “My office
works really hard to empower the student’s process and
make sure they are in control of where they go.”
Whitney Gregory, director of Judicial Affairs, said she
could not comment on whether this incident has been
filed with the university. Since Pacella was arrested by
Campus Safety and Police, the case is being pursued in
criminal court.
According to the Campus Safety and Police website,
the last forcible sex act occurred in 2007. But these
statistics are not always reflective of the actual campus
climate, Royster said.
“So what you read in those federal statistics for
campuses is mostly the unusual incident which actually
gets charged in a criminal setting and prosecuted by the
state,” she said.
In an average year, Royster sees anywhere from 30
to 50 students seeking resources surrounding sexual
violence or sexual assault. Last year, one of her highest,
she saw 52 students.
Pacella declined to comment.
Pacella was identified early in the investigation
as a suspect. Cantos said. Based on the evidence and
information from the District Attorney’s office, there
was enough information to make the arrest.
Coming off organization status suspension,
fraternity looks to re-establish itself by November
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Anna Johnson
Managing Editor
Pending the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity
meets the expectations of it’s national
organization and Elon University,
the group will regain organization
recognition Nov. 1. The university
St ripped Pi Kappa Phi of its organization
status after an investigation in late
April. The investigation followed an
incident where a potential member
was taken to the hospital for excessive
alcohol intake.
The fraternity was found responsible
for violating the Elon Honor Code
and the Greek Life Risk Management
Policies, said Shana Plasters, director
of Greek Life. The organization’s
activities and operations were halted
March 13, 2010 in order to begin the
investigation, said Brian O Shea, the
Pi Kappa Phi adviser and assistant to
the vice president for Student Life and
dean of students.
President Leo Lambert has publicly
said at a meeting about hazing with
student leaders and a meeting with
faculty and staff that Elon almost
had two student deaths because of
alcohol poisoning last spring. One
of those students was involved in
the incident that resulted in Pi Kappa
Phi’s suspended organization status,
according to Smith Jackson, dean of
student life.
“We had situations in the spring
that were really concerning,” Jackson
said. “We need to treat this as if
somebody died.”
Senior Ian Maxwell, vice president
of Pi Kappa Phi, wrote in an e-mail that
the fraternity would not like to release
See PI KAPPA PHI | PAGE 5
    

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