North Carolina Newspapers

    Saturday, February 27, 1932.
THE SALEMITE
Page Three.
SOCIETY
Friday evening the Seniors were
the guests of honor at an annual din
ner given by Mrs. Rondthaler in the
library. The decorations, red and
white flowers and blue candles, car
ried out a patriotic scheme. The
place cards were red diplomas tied
with white ribbons, red and white
in addition being the class colors.
Each Senior met her dinner partner
in the lobby of Main Hall, from where
they proceeded to library. After each
of the seven courses the guests changed
partners and progressed to another
table. With every course came favors
including flags, “George Washington”
and “Statue of Liberty” hats, canes
and parasols, conversational puzzles,
and a grab bag. Tiny individual cakes
were served, four of which contained
the much-coveted ring and dime, and
the less-wanted thimble and button.
Red and white after dinner mmts
were served in gold baskets. After
the coffee there were table fireworks.
Tommye Frye, Rosalie bmith,
Mary B. Williams, and Margaret
Schwarze furnished t h e music
throughout the dinner.
Katherine Lasater and Ann Mc
Kinnon are visiting Katherine’s aunt
at Elon College, N. C. this week-end.
Frances Caldwell is spending the
week-end with Anna Preston in
Charlotte.
Rachel Bray left Saturday for her
home in Mt. Airy to spend the week-
Katherine Bacon is visiting Miriam
Stevenson in Salisbury this week-end.
Emily Boger and Emily Moore are
visiting their respective homes m
Aibemarle and Mt. Olive.
TO MR. LEAP YEAR
Wee Blue Inn Changes
Hours Of Business
FOUR CLASSES FIGHT IN New Salem Tea Room Proves
PEPPY TOURNAMENT Great Success
The managers of the Wee Blue
(Continued From Paso One) Inn Call attention to the recent change
(6), Shuford, McKinnon, Davis, hours. Though the
Biles, Hanes, and Stough. Fresh-
■n frnm fmir
„-lpreston (10), Wall (5), Jet-
SENIORS BOW TO FROSH
The Freshmen cage team gained a
40-to-32 decision over the Seniors in
a hard-fought game Wednesday night,
February 24th. This game was the
third of the interclass series.
The Seniors took the lead at the
beginning of the game but were un
able to hold it. At the end of the
second quarter the Frosh were one
point ahead, the score being 19-18.
The defensive play of both teams
..as one of the features of the game.
The floor work of “Shorty” Biles,
captain of the Senior team, was out
standing. Holleman’s passes were un-
;ually good, also.
Cokey Preston, Freshman, was the
forward high scorer and was the most
consistent offensive player for the
lower class. Pat Holderness led the
Senior forwards in the scoring of
goals with a score of 14.
The line-up and summary; ^
Fresmmen Pos. Semors
C. Preston (23) - (14) A. Preston
R.F.
Carroll (11) ---^(W) Holderness
Keatley (6) -----
Holleman Langley
C.G.
T Biles
XT 1 Graves
Referee—McClure.
Umpire—Smith.
JUNIORS MEET
SOPHOMORES
didn’t because I’m not the sort that
would “horn in” on anybody else
property; I would rather suffer ir
silence like a lot of
pie are doing now. So far as that
goes, there’s not much danger of ^
getting a look-in anyway; the girls
around here will introduce you to
their fathers, mothers, sisters,
brothers, uncles, aunts, and grand-
parents but they don’t care to show Heiaenreich
you any more of the boy friend than
his picture.
This fact, however, only serves to
convince me that I am attractive be
cause they evidently don t want m>
competition. So I thought I d 3«st
write to you, Mister Leap Year, and
get you to help me out. I’ve tried
Dorothy Dix but she’s never been to
Salem College and doesn t know any
thing about the terrible problems we
girls here have to face. Now as 1 un
derstand it, you have a special
technique in which the girl does mos
of the work. There are so many
techniques in use down here already
that I get discouraged trying to think;
of something new, but since yours
is used only one year out of every four
I figure it ought to be more effective
than most of these old lines that have
been hung out every day of every year
since long before the calendar was
made. , ,
I am depending on you to help me
out in this matter. As for the type of
fellow I want. I’m not at all par
ticular and will take anything you
have to offer provided he is very good
looking, has blonde hair and deep
blue eyes, talks nice, plays football,
and has a good looking roadster. Oh
yes and I’d rather the hair would
be ’curly if it’s all the same to you.
I am ready and willing to do my part
for I am desperate. I’ve stayed
around here so long that I think even
Miss Lawrence would like to help me
get out, but I hated to bother her
with this knowing how busy she
You needn’t write an answer
this if you’ll just send a fellow .
way; I’ll be expecting him and be
lieve me I’ll take good care of him.
I’d like to meet him sort of accident
ally in a very effective setting. How
about sending him down to Gooch s
that would be so romantic.
Yours in hope,
—Pansy Ketchum.
still be open from four-thirty to five-
thirty in the afternoon, the night
hour is changed to nine-fifteen, re
maining open until ten-fifteen. When
a tea room does so much business that
all cleaning of dishes must be done
after closing hours, there must_ be
time allowed for that before light
bell.
Kitty Brown reports that the Wee
Blue Inn is a great success financially.
Already they have more than made
expenses. Most of the spare nickets
and dimes at Salem now go to Leh-
Hall instead of the drug.
PRINCIPAL OF ACADEMY
TALKS AT Y. W. C. A.
VESPERS
ship she'^^placed loyaTty.” Sometimes
people misunderstand the real mean-
ing of loyalty and think it is simply
standing up for one’s friends when
they are being criticized. Loyalty is
so big that no friendship can exist
long without it.
Loyalty makes us do things that we
would not ordinarily do. Ruth put it
before her desire for riches and went
to live in a lowly hut; she put it be
fore pride and went out to do a pau
per’s work. “She gave all—met the
demands and tests of loyalty and in
giving she found life and love and
happiness.” , , , j
“Teach us to know what loyalty de
mands—
Service and love, and willing hearts
and hands.
Help us to face in life each trial and
MANY VISITORS ATTEND
THURSDAY MUSIC
HOUR
Elegie Torjussen
Rebecca Thomas
Valse Impromptu ’ Von Wilm
Laura Elizabeth Bland
A Legend Tschaikowsky
Rose Softly Blooming Spohr
Frances Butner
Theme and Variations in G
Beethoven
Josephine Cohn
Bourree Handel
Ruth Dickieson
Hobgoblin Binding
Dorabelle Graves
Rigaudon Rameau
Mirage Carlos Salzedo
Ann Nishet
Impromptu in F minor Schubert
Irene Clay
Ritorna Vincitor Verdi
Mary B. Williams
Concert Etude MacDowell
Nell Cooke
Thursday, afternoon ^the Juniors, JJ^JnqSJ/ASHING-
TON CELEBRATION
once victorious,
torious Sophomores at the third
terclaSS game on the out-door CO d From Page one;
plaTe^d sSomofes Zn Tth laide Frk^Trchivrof the
of 29 to 5.
‘A man is never older than he
feels,” declared the old boss. “Now,
is morning I feel as fresh as a two-
ar-old!”
“Horse or egg?” asked his steno.
/eetly.
Students To Give
Evening Recital
Solos Representing Several
Departments of Music
Those who are interested in music
and particularly in the Salem School
of Music, which has recently attained
a high rating among colleges, look
forward with pleasure to the first
evening recital of the year. It will
be held Monday evening at eight
o’clock, in Memorial Hall.
Although a copy of the program
could not be secured in advance, a
list of the performers gives some
idea as to the excellence of the pro
gram. Misses Evelyn Pratt, Nancy
Harris, Rosalie Smith, Wanna Mary
Huggins, and Irene Clay will play
piano solos. The singers will be Mrs.
J. Harold Swain, Mis5 Mary B. Wil
liams, Mrs. B. A. Bowers, and Mr.
Kenneth Bryant. Misses Helen
Graeber and Elizabeth McClaugherty
will play the violin. The single organ
solo will be played by Miss Dorothy
Thompson.
“I hear your son is getting on
“Rather. Two years ago he \
my old suits—now I wear his.”
Three Little Words
“Goto GOOCH’S”
For TUESDAY only TWO
sandwiches and a chocolate
soda 25c
Dial 6852 and 9466
WE SERVE BLUE RIBBON
ICE CREAM
The
Reynolds Grill
For the very best in food
WE CATER TO BANQUETS
AND DINNER PARTIES
Cafeteria on 1 0th Floor
Reasonable Prices
SEE OUR WINDOWS, WALK-OVER’S NEW
SPRING SHOES. NOW AT NEW LOW PRICES
^ 120 West 4th Street
JACKSON’S WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP
The line-up follows:
Juniors Pos Sophomores
M. L. White Leake
R.F.
Huntingdon
L.F.
Jo Walker M. Holleman
E. Mickey ’
C.G.
M.K. Thorpe
R.G.
M. Johnson
Final games will be played off next
week anticipatory to the annual
basket ball banquet Saturday evemng
at which Miss “Shocky O linen,
head of basket ball will be toast-
mistress.
Dr. Rondthaler Talks
To Davidson Students
Refuses to Reveal Facts of
His Address
laiCiC X 1 Icb) tiiCiiivioi. yj 1
Province of the Moravian Church,
the exact order of service, hymns, and
the music were found. Miss Fries
translated from German into English
the anthems which the choir sang. •
To accompany the singing then and
now there were five instruments.
The musicians who played last Sun
day were Miss Hazel Read, first
violin and IVliss Elizabeth Mc
Claugherty, second violin, both ^ of
whom need no further introduction,
Mr. Earle Slocum, head of the instru
mental department of the Greensboro
Public Schools, flute, Mr. Robert
Ormsby, violin, and Mr. B. J. Pfohl,
contra-bass violin. Mrs. J. Kenneth
Pfohl conducted both the choir and
the orchestra.
Never before has the Home Mo
ravian Church been as crowded as it
was. Chairs were placed in every
available space and 'the aisles and
vestibules were filled with people
standing.
On Washington’s Birthday Di
Rondthaler addressed the students of
Davidson College on the subject of
George Washington’s trip through
the Southland. Being thoroughly
familiar with the outline of that
journey, he presented it to them in a
vivid and interesting way. Needless
to say, he included the time that
Washington spent at Salem and de
scribed the valuable relics of that
occasion which are treasured in
Moravian archives.
Whether or not Dr. Rondthaelr
really made George Washington
make a detour by Davidson campus
to admire the college, nobody knows.
He smile like the pansy in his button
hole and asserts that he did. Always,
it appears, he would make people feel
happy.
ACADEMY PUPILS V SIT
HISTORIC SITES IN
OLD SALEM
(Contin
;e One)
’ of
haunt of the “little red
Revolutionary War fame.
After the Brothers’ House had been
sufficiently inspected, the Sisters
House was visited. The beautiful
architecture, the lovely white pine
floors, and the charming hand-
wrought lock and key were par
ticularly pointed out. The girls read
with great interest the old rules which
students at Salem Academy then had
to obey. The basement of the Sis
ters’ House is similar to that of the
Brothers’ House.
The building which we next saw
was the tavern where George Wash
ington spent two nights in 1791.^ Ir
the main room there is a spinnet piano
remade into a desk. Upstairs is the
room in which he slept.
The museum was reserved for an
other day. We are all looking for
ward to the time when we can gc
through that building with so inter
esting guide as Dr. Rondthaler.
Mrs. Campbell will send her car for you if you wish to come to
THE BLUE WILLOW
—FOR LUNCHEON OR DINNER—
Call her at 9923 or 9426—421 W. Spruce Street.
NEW GLOVES
In Egg Shell and White, lovely quality of Doe Skin, with flared Cuffs.
All Sizes. Price $1.95
D. G. CRAVEN COMPANY
“MEET ME AT THE IDEAL”
OUR MEZZANINE
LOUNGING ROOM
The Meeting Place for Salemites
WRITING DESKS
AND SUPPLIES
TELEPHONES
BEST BOOM
THE NEW IDEAL
"The Best
Chatham Building -
“Electricity—The
Servant in the Home”
It does the cooking, refrigerating, sweep
ing, washing, ironing and other tasks—and
does them all more efficiently and with the
expenditure of less effort on the part of
the housewife than you can imagine. If
your home is not thoroughly electrified you
are missing much that makes life worth
while.
SOUTHERN
PUBLIC
UTILITIES
COMPANY
    

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