North Carolina Newspapers

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PAGEANT j
CONTEST !
I
PAGEANT
CONTEST
VOL. XV.
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1935.
Number 16.
PAGEANT CONTEST
CLOSES MIDNIGHT
FEB^Y 15TH
May Day Announces Again
$10 Prize For Original
Fete
Friday, February 15, is the last
day on which Pageants for May Day
may be submitted for entrance in the
contest. The May Day Committee
announces again that the prize for
the best pageant will be ten dollars,
awarded for originality and most
workable plans rather than for fine
writing. The contest is open to all
academy and college students, and
it is hoped that several pageants
will be entered.
ORMANDY CONDUCTS
MINNEAPOUS SYMPHONY
Large Number of Salem
Students Attend
G>ncert
HONOR ROLL FOR 1ST
SEMESTER ISLONGEST
IN M/NY YEARS
DR. HENRY RISNER
SPEAKS AT VESPERS
The Art of Living
Dr. Henry Kisner, one of the
twelve most famous pastors, spoke
at Vespers Sunday evening on “The
Art of Living.”
The Salvation of character is
thought. This statement may be
based on Phil. 4:8; “Whatsoever
things are true, honorable, pure,
lovely, and of good report.” Think
on these things. Whatever one
studie,s will some day be of some
use. Wordsworth said, “Life re
quires an art which our souls must
bend.” Two things which must go
into the art of living, are sincerity
and inspiration. It is an art of
thinking to be able to reduce be
wildering things, to know how to
command a situation, to understand
and interpretate and to discriminate.
If we want religious inspiration we
must have perception which may be
pity, commercial, for show, or for
love which is conception.
Salvation of character in our con
ception of Christ rests upon open
ness, sensitivenes, pity, self respect,
and independence or the width and
breadth of service one can do. Sal
vation of the fine art of thinking is
in thinking. As a result we have an
ideal which is an idea ^vith which
we live.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning said,
“It takes a soul to move a body.”
The Minneapolis Symphony Or
chestra, under the direction of
Eugene Ormandy, internationally
famous conductor, presented a con
cert in Reynolds Memorial Auditor
ium, Monday night, February 4, at
8:30.
The concert, which was the third
presentation under the auspices of
the Civic Music Association, was en
joyed by “one of the greatest con
cert audiences ever assembled in
Koynolds Auditorium.” Salem Col
lege and Academy were very well
j represented both by students and
faculty.
The oj)ening number on the pro
gram was Kichard Wagner’s Over
ture to “The Flying Dutchman.”
This was followed by four move
ments of the Tschaikowsky Sym
phony No. 4 in F. minor. The three
compositions played after the inter
mission were “Don Juan'’ by Bich
ard Strauss, Scherzo Capriccioso by
Anton Dvorak and “ Jablotchko, ” a
Russian Sailors’ Dance taken from
the ballet, “The Red Poppy” by
Gliere.
The encores that the orchestra
played for a very appreciative audi
ence were: “Songs My Mother
Taught Me,” by Dvorak, a pizzicoti
number, and the favorite “Blue
Danube Waltz” by Richard Strauss.
The Minneapolis Symphony Or
chestra is directly affiliated with the
University of Minnesota and is now
in its thirty-second season. It has
more than a hundred pieces.
STUDENT SEMINAR
COMING
A Student Seminar on ‘ ‘ Religion
and Life” is to be held this coming
week-end, February 9 and 10 at the
Greensboro City Y. W. C. A. Bruce
Curry, Professor of Bible at Union
Theological Seminary in New York
City, and leader of student groups
in the United States and Canada,
is to lead the sessions, to which all
interested students in the North
Carolina Colleges are invited.
Our “Y” is sending as represen
tatives Charlotte King, Erika Marx,
Ethel Ilighsmith and Mrs. O’Neal.
SALEM TWO YEARS
AGO TODAY
ADMINISTRATION GRANTS
DAY STUDENTS’ FBTITION
The Administration on Tuesday
announces that chapel attendance
by day students might be volun
tary for a trial period.
STUDY OF APPOINTMENTS
URGED
Dr. Robert S. Rankin was the
speaker at expanded chapel on
Wednesday. He gave a detailed
study of the powers of President
elect Roosevelt.
MRS. COUNCIL SENDS
GREETING TO SALEM
Mrs. Alice Council of Hickory,
the oldest living alumnae of Salem
sent the following message to the
students on her birthday:
“Tell everyone at Salem that
I love them. I often think about
the dear old school and wish that I
could be there. I appreciate the
kind messages that were sent to
jne on my birthday, and if I were
able to write I should answer them
all.”
SALEM THREE YEARS
AGO TODAY
DR. EDMUND SCHWARZE
ADDRESSES STUDENTS
Dr. Edmund Schwarze, pastor of
Calvary Moravian Church and
member of the Board of Trustees,
addressed the students at expanded
chapel. The subject of his talk
was a tour of the Holy Land from
which he returned recently.
POUNDERS’ DAY CELEBRATED
Miss Adelaide Fries spoke in
chapel on life at Salem in the past
and present. The visiting alumnae
were entertained at tea.
UNIQXnB COLLECTION OF
PHOTOS ON DISPLAY
Through the generosity of Mr.
Owen D. Moon, President of the
“Journal and Sentinel” Publica
tions, about one hundred prints of
George Washington are to be dis
played in the library. Books and
original documents will be in
cluded.
Sixty-Six Girls Honor Stu
dents; Mrs. Morton Omit
ted Through Error
Dr. Rondthaler read in chapel the
two lists of first and second Honors
for the First Semester of 1934-35.
As he read the list, many marvelled
at its length; but in its corrected
form it is even longer. Through a
mistake Mrs. Morton, who made the
first honor roll, was not included in
the chapel reoding. Mrs. Morton is
to bo congratulated along with the
other sixty-five honor students. The
office force in the registrar’s office
is also to bo commended for sending
out the list so quickly at a time
when many other things are being
arranged there.
The list, corrected, is as follows:
SECOND HONOR ROLL
Mildred Barnes
Dorothy Anita Blair
Laura Elizabeth Bland
Margaret Briggs
Agnes Brown
Mavis Bulluck
Rachel Carroll
Myrtle Clay
Jane Hanes Crow
Dorothy Dunn
Viola Farthing
Florida Graves
Sara Ingram
Mary Jackson
Hazel McMahan
Mrs. Morton
Lois Moores
Lucile Ogburn
Jean Robinson
Edith Sappenfield
Margaret Schwarze
Mary Louise Shore
Janet Stimpson
Inez Templeman
Virginia Thompson
Arnice Topp
Lois Torrence
Elizabeth Tuttle
Ann Vann
Margaret Ward
Etta Burt Warren
Eleanor Watkins
Jane Williams
Anna Withers
Ruth Wolfe
FIRST HONOR ROLL
Rebecca Baynes
Margaret Calder
Sara Clancy
Caroline Diehl
Idaliza Dunn
Anna Wray Fogle
Louise Gaither
Virginia Garner
Elizabeth Gray
Melrose Hendrix
Edna Higgins
Rebecca Hines
Delle Huggins
Mary McVeigh Hutchison
Elizabeth Pollard Jerome
Sara Louise Johnston
Florence Joyner
Mildred Krites
Ruth Kuykendall
Margaret McLean
June Morris
Stephanie Newman
Mary Penn
Cortlandt Preston
Naney Schallert
Gertrude Schwalbe
Bessie Reid Shipp
Rose Siewers
Margaret Stafford
Emma D. Wargo
Josephine Whitehead
The StudeAt Body offers its
sympathy to Miss Kate Smith
in her recent beravement.
ALUMNAE WEEK-END
IS BIG SUCCESS
Entertainment Is Enjoyed
By AU
From the moment the first alum
na set her foot on this familar
ground till the last alumnae left, last
week-end was a grand success. Be
ginning with the I. R. S. Banquet
Friday night events came fast and
furious. The alumnae meeting, the
academy breakfast, the visiting of
classes, expanded chapel on Satur
day, the day student’s tea, the
trustees and alumnae dinner, the
moving pictures, and the party all
contributed toward making the en
tire time a wonderful round of en
tertainment.
Two talented alumnae, or should
I say two of the many talented alum
nae added to the pleasure of the
occasion by giving violin solos and
by singing. Iji expand)ed chapel
Miss Rebecca Hines presented to Dr.
Rondthaler in a most unique way
the repapering and painting of South
Hall that the day students have
done. She gave him samples of each
kind of paper and paint that was
used.
Mention must be made of the
clever dinner Saturday night at
which the trustees were presented
to the school as movie stars. Miss
Elizabeth Jerome drew the ideal
trustee by taking various features
of each one and making from them
a whole.
Dr. Rondthaler expressed his ap
preciation in chapel on Tuesday for
all the work and infinite care that
students, faculty and other help took
to make the week-end as big a suc
cess as it really w’as.
LOCAL ALUMNAE HOLD
IMPORTANT MEETING
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1st
Mrs. Harry Grimsley Elect
ed To Serve Another
Year
DR. CHARLES MYERS
SPEAKER AT CHAPEL
Feature of Founders’ Day
Celebration
At tho chapel service held Satur
day morning Dr. Charles Myers, pas
tor of the First Presbyterian Church
of Greensboro was the guest speak
er. The service ^vas held under di
rection of the Scorpions in honor of
the founding of Salem College in
1772.
The Glee Club oiwned the pro
gram by singing two numbers in
Latin: “Ecce Panis” and “Christus
Factus, ’ ’ written by Cyre de Brant.
These were followed by “Dear Land
of Home,” written by Sibelus. An
other musical feature was a violin
solo, played by Mrs. Laura H. Nor-
den, visiting alumna.
Dr. Rondthaler explained briefly
about the founding of Salem College.
Four men, Frederick William de
Marshall, John JI. Graff, Paul
Tiersch, Richard Utley, representing
Saxony, Franconia, Germany and
Yorkshire England, determined to
give girls and young women educa
tional opportunities equal with those
of men, in 1772 established the col
lege.
Miss Mary Penn, representing the
Scorpians, then introduced the
speaker. Dr. Charles Myers. He spoke
of the greatness of the personalities
of the pioneers who founded Salem
College, and of their determination.
They as great people of today, were
not controlled by fear of the conse
quences, or by fear of not following
tho way of the crowd. To develop
fine personalities we need, first, faith
in God. Notions which have had
faith in God have never been ruined.
Just as Jesus showed deep interest
in the people with whom he came in
contact, people today should re-
•spond deeply and quickly to the
things around them. Many times
people have failed Him, yet he con
tinues to trust them. Second, there
(CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO)
At the 18th annual meeting of the
Winston-Salem branch of the Salem
College Alumnae Association, held
Friday night in the college library,
Mrs. Harry Grimsley was re-elected
president of the chapter. Mrs. R,
E. Guthrie was named vice-president
and Miss Margatet Vick was elected
secretary and treasurer.
The class of 1938 were guests of
the evening and during the evening
added to the program by singing the
Salem Alma Mater.
The speaker of the evening was
Harry Comer, general secretary of
(CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO)
HIGH ENROLLMENT FOR
EXTENSION COURSES
Revised Schedule
Announced
The second semester enrollment
for extension courses indicated that
registrations for extension work in
1934-35 will be high or higher than
any year within the past 10 years.
The enrollment will likely exceed
243 which was the total number of
registrations recorded in the exten
sion division for the peak year of
1928-29. Salem College has been
engaged in extension work for more
than 10 years and the extension
courses attract both elementary and
high school in the Winston-Salem
and Forsyth County Administrative
Units.
The Home economics seminar will
meet on Tuesday afteronon at 4:15
o’clock at Main Hall, Salem College;
Investigations in reading, Wednes
day afternoon at 4 o’clock, West
End School Administration Building;
Social studies curriculum, Thursday
afternoon at 4 o’clock, West End
School Administration Building. The
seminar in home economics will be
conducted by Miss Leftwich and
Mrs. Meinung. Miss Marks will
teach the class in investigations in
reading and also the course in scoial
studies curriculum.
SENIORS GIVE ANNUAL
TRUSTEE DINNER
Mary Penn Toastmistress
Trustees, Seniors, and Members of
the Faculty were guests of honor at
the Seniors’ dinner. The dining
room was beautifully arranged and
softly lit by candles. Each trustee
was introduced as a movie hero by
a senior, and Mademoiselle Libby
Jerome, the famous French painter,
sketched a picture of the senior idol,
choosing the outstanding features of
the different Trustees.
The Senior Class sang an original
•song to the tune of “Lady Play
Your Mandolin.”
Dusty are the desert lands
Crusty are the ocean strands
Lusty now we clap our hands
Trustee here’s to you!
Gusty are all movie fans
Bust balloons, strike up the bands
Just see how we clap our hands
Trustee, here’s to you!
Mary Penn was quite charming in
her role as toastmistress, and her
witty remarks kept the guests laugh
ing until the last crumb of apple pie
had disappeared.
    

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