North Carolina Newspapers

    I PLEASEBEMY {
VALENTINE!
VOL. XV.
WINSTON-SALEM. N. C„ WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 1935.
Number 1 7.
DEAN VARDELL HONORED
BY HANS KINDLER
Will Go To Washington
February 28
Students and faculty of Salem
College and Academy will be very
much interested iii the following
I)aragraph taken from the National
Symphony Orchestra Magazine;
“The concert to be given by the
National S y m p li o n y Orchestra,
Thursday afternoon, February 28,
will be devated entirely to music by
American composers, and will in
clude “Chanticleer Overture,” by
Daniel Gregory Mason; Randall
Thompson’s “Second Symphony;”
“Allegretto on Chorale,” by Roy
Harris; “Joe Clark Steps Out” by
Charles Vardell, Jr.; and “The
Chambered Nautilus,” for chorus
and orchestra, by Deems Taylor. Dr.
Kindler has invited the composers to
attend this concert, and it is expect
ed that they will be present Feb
ruary 28 when their works are pre
sented. The Washington choral So
ciety of 100 voices, which is directed
by Louis A. Potter, will participate
in the presentation of “The Cham
bered Nautilus.”
Mr. Vardell is planning to attend
the concert together with Mrs. Var
dell and their daughter Margaret.
“HAVING FUN WITH
YOUR MIND” SUBJEa
OF Y.P.M. LECTURER
Dean House of Chapel Hill
Speaks
MISS IRENE JONES
AT VESPERS
On Sunday evening, February 17,
the World Fellowship Group of the
Y. W. C. A. will present a special
program at Vespers when Miss Irene
Jones of the E. J. Reynolds High
School will be the guest speaker. Her
topic, for the evening, “The Chris
tian’s Individual Responsibility in
International Relations,” will be
of particular interest to many.
At expanded chapel last Wednes
day morning. Dean Robert House
from the University of North Caro
lina made an interesting talk on
the subject—“Having Fun With
Your Mind.” He said that people
were willing to endure almost any
privation or suffering for the privil
ege of doing and writing the things
in which they sincerely believe.
Never again will we have the quiet
and the leisure to study ourselves
that we have during our school days.
This introspection should not be too
serious, but rather joyous and sin
cere.
Americans don’t know the differ
ence between fun and excitement.
Just as an engine goes faster and
faster when the control belt snaps,
thus it is with us. Socrates had the
right idea when he said, “Don’t pre
tend to know what you don’t” and
“the only pleasure and joy in life
is based on intelligence and char
acter.” Thus we must not let our
selves be dominated by small things
such as political power, social pres
tige and wealth.
We get real fun only out of what
we do for ourselves—an active and
not a passive spirit. Dean House
comforted us all by a few helpful
suggestions to follow when attend
ing social functions. The other peo
ple, he said, are just as nervous as
we are. A good way to overcome
this nervousness is to listen to peo
ple who are good conversationalists
and to fill, our minds with worth
while subjects for conversation. In
this connection he suggested two
books which were valuable to him,
“The Art of Thinking, and “From
A College Window.”
(CONTINUED ON PAGE FOUR)
SALEM ONE YEAR
AGO TODAY
DR. RONDTHALER SPEAKER
AT LATIN CLUB MEETING
Dr. Rondthaler spoke to the mem
bers of Alpha Iota Pi at their re
cent meeting on the topic ‘ ‘ Why I
Love Latin.” He pointed out the
following reasons for his love of
Latin; The friends and associates
it has made for him, it is a world
language, is delightful and enter
taining to study.
ART EXHIBIT TO BE HELD
AT SALEM
Next week an art exhibit of
German works-etehings, woodcuts,
and lithographs will be on display
at Salem College. The exhibit be
gins with the works of Max Lieb-
ermann and traces material thro
the modern trends. The exhibit is
brought here by the Carl Shultz
Memorial Foundation, an organiza
tion which has for its project the
formation of cultural relationships
between Germany and the United
States.
PROFESSOR EARL PULLIAS
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
SPEAKER
Dr. Earl Pullias, of Duke Uni
versity was the speaker at the last
meeting of the Psychology Club.
His topic was “Hypnotism.”
SENIOR DINNER
Saturday evening Dr. and Mrs.
Rondthaler delightfully entertain
ed the Seniors of Salem College and
other guests at dinner.
SALEM TWO YEARS
AGO TODAY
SPRING ELECTIONS TO BE IN
CHARGE OP A COMMITTEE
This year a new plan of having
spring nominations made’by a com
mittee is to be tried. The com
mittee is to be comjwsed of the
following: the president of Student
Self-Government, Y. W. 0. A., I.
R. S., the Athletic Association, the
editors of the Salemite and the
Sights and Insights, the second
vice-president of Student Self-
Government, the class presidents,
the president of the college, and
one faculty member chosen by the
committee and the president of the
college.
REVIEW OP COMPOSITIONS OF
FORMER SALEM MUSICIANS
Wednesday morning Chapel. Sal
em’s own music was presented by
students of the School of Music.
Those whose compositions were
presented were. E. W. Lineback,
Saverio d’ Anna, George Mark-
graff, Misses Amy and Lisetta Van
Vleck, and Professor Agthe.
PADEREWSKI TO BE IN
WINSTON-SALEM
On February 25, Paderewski,
famous pianist, is to be in Winston-
Salem at the R. J. Reynolds Audi
torium, His program will include
compositions by Bach, Beethoven,
Schumann, Schelling, Chopin, Litzt,
and one of his own pieces.
MAY DAY COMMITTEE
SPONSORS AN EXHIBIT
Baby Pictures of Famous
Salem People on Display
The May Day Committee is spon
soring an exhibit of baby pictures
on Thursday and Friday afternoons
and Friday night. The pictures were
procured without the knowledge of
the girls. All Salem celebrities will
be seen in the days of their real
youth or infancy. Salem faculty in
curls and long dresses; Salem girls
with their innocent faces; a rogue’s
gallel-y of famous beaux at their
tender ages, all will be on display
for two whole days. Can you imag
ine what Dr. Rondthaler looked like
at the age of six months! Perhaps
you can visualize our May Queen in
the simple dress she wore at the
age of three. I wonder if Lois Tor
rence was drawing posters before
she could speak. Ethel Highsmith
has never since been so chubby and
Lelia Williams hasn’t g^own very
much. The whole exhibit is a grand
success and one laugh from begin
ning to end.
JUNIORS TAKE HRST
BAHLE AS BASKET
BALL SEASON OPENS
Senior-Freshmen Game
Tomorrow Night
The junior class, defending cham
pions, moved into the front of the
Salem College basket ball round-
robin tournament play by defeating
the sophomores in the oijening game
of the series at the college gym
nasium Monday night by the score
of 21 to 18.
The juniors won the title as sophs
last year.
The winners moved into an early
lead, gaining a 7-1 advantage at the
end of the first period and holding
a 12 to 7 lead at half-time. But the
sophs came back fighting and with
three minutes to play knotted the
count at 18-all.
Eugenia McNew slipped in a foul
basket and McArn Best tallied from
action in these final minutes to win
for the juniors. The guarding of
Marx stood out for the winners while
Best led the scoring. Nolan topped
the scoring for the sophs with Little
and Bullock doing fine defensive
work.
The junior reserves, with Hooks
and Rights playing brilliantly, also
defeated the sophomore reserves in
a contest, 19 to 5.
The seniors are slated to tackle
the freshmen at the college gym
Thursday night at 7:15 o’clock.
Line-up and summary:
Sophomores (18) (21) Juniors
Pos.
Nolan (11) (10) Best
F.
Meadows (5) (5) McNew
F.
Fraley (2) (6) McNeely
P.
Little Marx
(CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO)
GERTRUDE STEIN AT
CHAPEL HILL
MISS PRESTON, MR.
SHAFFNER MARRIED
IN WASHINGTON
Dr. Rondthaler Officiates at
Lovely Ceremony
February 9th
stein at Chapel Hill Gertrude,
Chapel, Stein, Hill, Gertrude.
Which only means in the language
of the lady herself, that Miss Ger
trude Stein, noted author lectured at
Chapel Hill on Tuesday, February
12. She spoke under the auspices
of the English department and the
American Association of University
Women of Chapel Hill. The audi
ence was limited to five hundred.
Miss Stein came to Chapel Hill
from Virginia. She gave lectures
at Sweet Briar College, the Univer
sity of Virginia and the University
of Richmond.
A wedding of much social prom
inence throughout the south was that
of Miss Anna Jackson Preston of
Charlotte and Washington, and Emil
Nathaniel ShafEner of Winston-
Salem, which was solemnized in
Washington Saturday afternoon at
4 o’clock.
The ceremony was performed by
Dr. Howard E. Rondthaler, presi
dent of Salem college and academy,
at the chapel of the Army War col
lege in the city of Washington. The
bride was given in marriage by her
father, Mr. Randolph Preston.
Her dress was of ivory satin trim
med at the neckline with rose point
lace which belonged to her maternal
great-grandmother. Her only orna
ments were an old brooch of her
grandmother’s and a diamond and
sapphire bracelet, a gift of the
groom. Her veil which was made cap
fashion was caught at the side with
orange blossoms, and she carried
white roses and lilies-of-the-valley
in a shower bouquet.
Her two sisters. Misses Cortlandt
and Julia Preston, and her cousin.
Miss Peggy Christian, acted as
maids. Miss Cortlandt Preston, the
maid-of-honor, wore an afternoon
frock of apple green taffeta with a
brown tulle hat and carried Tails-
man roses. Misses Julia Prestan
and Peggy Christian made charm
ing bridesmaids in tea rose taffeta
with brown tulle hats and bouquets
of Talisman roses. Little Miss La-
lage Barringer, the flower girl, was
dressed in a dainty tea rose Kate
Greenaway dress with a poke bon
net of brown tulle. She carried a
small old-fashioned bouquet of
Talisman buds.
The gi-oomsmen were Mr. Louis
Shaffner, brother of the groom, Mr.
Ned Heefner, and Mr. Archie K.
Davis who served as best man. All
three are from Winston-Salem.
The bride is the eldest daughter
of Special Assistant Attorney Gen
eral and Mrs. Randolph Preston of
Charlotte and Washington. She
graduated at Salem college with an
A. B. degree and has been traveling
secretary for the college for the
past two years. During her years at
Salem she was accorded many hon
ors, being elected president of the
student self-government and May
queen.
Mr. Shaffner is the son of Henry
Fries Shaffner, chairman of the
board of directors of the Wachovia
Bank and Trust company, and Ag
nes Siewers Shaffner, both fo Win-
ston- Salem. He attended Asheville
school, received the A. B. degree
from the University of North Caro
lina, and studied for one year at the
Columbia University School of
(CONTINUED ON PAGE THREE)
LINCOLNS BIRTHDAY
FEBRUARY 12TH
What Do You Know About
Him?
Yesterday one hundred and fifteen
years ago Abraham Lincoln was
born. We all know that he was born
in a log cabin, that he was a “rail
splitter,” that lie walked eight miles
to return six cents change, that he
did his arithmetic on a shovel, that
he was six feet four inches tall.
But there are a few interesting
things about him which we have
never heard. Some of them make
him more human, some, more re
markable than ever, and some are
merely interesting things to know.
The Lincoln family favored Old
Testament names. The frst ancestor
of Abraham’s to come to America
was Samuel Lincoln. His son and
grandson were both named Mordecai.
Next came John. One of his sons
was Abraham, the grandfather of
the President and the father of five
sons—Jacob, Abraham, Isaac, John,
and Thomas. Thomas was the father
of “Honest Abe.”
Abraham Lincoln never joined the
church. Although he was deeply re
ligious, even as a boy he shunned the
vociferous camp-meetings of the
time, and avoided membership in the
church.
The river had a great fascination
for Lincoln. For a long time his
ambition was to be “a steam boat
man. ’ ’
After Lincoln had read thoroughly
and earnestly his few books, there
came a time when he felt the impulse
to write. lie composed several
essays, one on “Cruelty to Ani
mals,” after lie had kept some boys
from putting a burning coal on the
back of a wood turtle; another was
on “Temperance.” He attempted
verses and satires, which were not
(CONTINUED ON PAGE TWO)
EXCHANGE COLUMN
t
News Thither and Yon
“Killed by Suppression” hangs
on the office door of “The Revielle”
Louisiana State University Student
Paper, as wo go to press. Staff has
resigned—signal that they will not
submit to censorship. Editors and
all their helpmeets have “what a
life,” if they don’t weaken.
NEW PROCTOR ELECTED
FORCLEWELLBUeiNG
Rainey, House President
Doing Good Work
The house government in Alice
Clewell Building has been most ef
ficiently carried on this year. Gar-
nelle Rainey, House President is
much to be complimented. Sharing
responsibility with the House Presi
dent are the Sub Presidents, Jane
Crow on First Floor, Aggie Brown
on Second, and Edith Rose on Third.
The new proctors elected for the
term of six weeks are First Floor,
Margaret Briggs, Charlotte King;
Second Floor, Nancy McNeeley, Etta
Burt Warren; Third Floor, Dorothy
Burnette, Jo Whitehead.
“If a man is a fool by birth and
choice, I admire him. If he is a fool
by birth and a college graduate by
choice. I’ve got to laugh. America
swarms with highly educated college
graduates, marvelously unemployed;
do not know how to kill time in
telligently. Which is magnificent.
“Find out where you stand, be
yourself, and don’tlet anybody or
any configuration of ideas mess with
the program of your life. If you’re
sure of yourself and sure of what
you’re doing, go ahead, get a swell
education, or jump into real life it
self. If you aren’t sure of yourself,
well—. You won’t change anything:
You’ll be changed by everything,
and you’ll be a chinch to come out
ou top, a big success, and a bigger
fraud. ’ ’
Wm. Saroyan: Author of “The
Daring Young Man on the Fly
ing Trapeze,” O’Henry Memor
ial Award Winner.
BARNARD COLLEGE, N. Y.
The editor says we must be peace
ful college maidens, because ques
tionnaires on what is the American
College girl’s attitude of wart
were sent to women’s colleges
throughout the United States and
only a few Southern colleges respon
ded, yet, on the other hand. Northern
colleges took great interest. The
indifference is blamed on the facul-
(CONTINUED ON PAGE FOUR)
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