North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two.
THE SALEMITE
Friday, February 2, 1940.
Published Weekly By The
Student Body of
Salem College
Member
Southern Inter-Oollegiate
Press Asso.'iation
SUBSCRIPTION
PRICE : : $2.00 a Year : : 10c a Copy
K/f K^r
RCPResCNTCD FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
PissociolGd GoUe65crte Press National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative ^
Distributor of Madison Ave. New York. N.^
GoUG^IQI© CHICAOO ■ B08T0B • L0» AHCELES * SAM ^RANCMaR>
EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT
Sara Harrison
Associate Editor
— -
Katharine King
News Editor
EDITORIAL STAFF
Muriel Brietz
Sue Forrest
Miss Marian Blair
Staff Assistants:—
Frances Angelo
Pat Barrow
Louise Bralower
Jo Ann Brill
Eleanor Carr
Carolyn Creson
Dorothy Dixon
Carrie Donnell
Sallie Emerson
Marie Fitzgerald
Billie Hanes
F.leanor Hutchison
Leila Johnston
Martha Jones
Margery McMullen
Anne Mewborne
Johnsie Moore
Nancy O’Neal
Lucile Paton
Mary Louise Rhodes
Dale Rosenbloom
Betsy Spach
Katherine Swavely
Marie Van Hoy
Mary Worth Walker
FEATURE STAFF
Staff Assistant*:—
Eugenia Baynes
Edith Horsfield
Melba Mackie
Lena Winston Morris
Marian Norris
Nancy Suiter
Reece Thomas
Elizabeth Weldon
BUSINESS DEPARTMENT
Business Manager - Virginia Breakell
Assistant Business Manager — Betsy Hobby
Advertising Manager Ella Walker Hill
Exchange and Circulation Manager Ruth Schnedl
Edna Baugham
Marvel Campbell
Becky Candler
Nancy Chesson
Avalon Early
Polyanna Evans
Martha Hine
Marian Johnson
ADVERTISING STAFF
Mildred Kelly
Jane Kirk
Helen Leinbach
Doris Nebel
Ruth O’Neal
Betty Barbour
Margaiet Patterson
Mabel Ktzer
Eloise Rhodes
Lizzie Sartin
Rachel Sides
Dorothy Si.sk
Lucille Springer
Ruth Thomas
Barbara Wood
Ruth Yancey
EXCHANGE AND CIRCULATION STAFF
Sarah Henry Margaret Morrison Mattie Mae Reavis
Dorothy McLean Barbara Norman PhyUis Utley
POST-SEMESTER
THANKS
This first week in our new semester we want to extend
our sincere appreciation to the members of the faculty and of
the library staff for their willing and very helpful co-operation
during examinations. Without the patient advice of all our
professors many of us would be in a rather hopeless state at the
present time; with their advice, although our grades may not
have been all A’s or B’s, we have a new grasp with which to
begin another semester. To the librarians we also owe our
thanks, for our study between January 18th-27th would cer
tainly have suffered had it not been for their kind assistance
in supplying us with the necessary books as well as the neces
sary quietness.
D. D.
AHE YOU
SHY?
Are you afraid to speak in public? Do you say, “Please,
I’m willing to do “anything” else, but I’m no speaker,” when
asked to preside over a meeting, conduct a devotional, or give
a talk? Did you envy Leila Johnston’s ease, self-confidence,
and poise Thursday morning in chapel?
A course in public speaking and parliamentary pro
cedure would help you to overcome this handicap. This course
would enable Salem to produce more and better leaders —
women who will be presidents of women’s clubs and leaders of
civic societies, women who will feel self-reliant and who will
seem to belong to any social group.
Courses in public speaking have proved their worth in
the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina,
William and Mary College, and Saint Mary's Junior College.
Why can’t wa have such a course as this at Salem?
—D. R.
DO YOU KNW?
Do you know how the “Y” spends
its money? If you don’t, surely you
would be interested in finding out.
As we all know the Y.W.C.A. is not
just the “Y” Cabinet, but is all of
us, and we pay dues to the “Y.”
Let us see where this money is go
ing. From now on there will be a
“Do You Know” Column in the
‘ ‘ Salemite,” which is to show us
where our money goes and what
groups and individuals we assist.
Don’t forget — read the “Do You
K^ow” columns weekly. Here goes
for the first of the series.
Do you know that the “Y” has
an adopted son? We have. His name
is Peter Maskar, and he lives in far
away Alaska. Peter is 5 years old.
The “Y'” adopted him last year, a
successor to Fritz, our first son, who
outgrew his mother’s care. When we
adopted Peter we assumed the re
sponsibility of paying for his board
and clothing. This year we re
membered him at Christmas with a
gift^ and in return we received a
card with his picture enclosed (It’s
now on the bulletin board.) We
heard about Peter through the Mo
ravian Orphanage which cares for
him.
Had you realized that Peter be
longs to all of us?
COIN FRANCAIS
Voici un article intfiressant sur un
film frangais que j’ai trouve dans
“I’lllustration” pour le 30 dficembre
1939 — “Un Episode De La Revolu
tion Mis A L’Ecran Fran5ais—”
“Sous le titre: “Vive la Nation!
un film fran^ais est pr6sent6 qui,
pour n’ avoir pas ^t6 inspir6 ]>ar la
guerre ni meme realise 'depuis 1’
ouverture des hostilitfis, n’en est pas
moins en correlation dtroite avec les
sentiments qui nous animent actuel-
lement. II a pour sujet un Episode de
la Elvolution frangaise assez peu
connu gfinfiralement: 1’ histoire du
septiSme couplet de “la Marseill
aise. ”
Ce couplet — I’un des plus c^l6-
bres du fameux hymne — est celui
qui commence par les mots: “Nous
entrerons dans la carriSre quand nos
ainds n’y seront plus.” II n’a pas 6t6
compost S, Strasbourg en meme
temps que les six autres, c’est-i-dire
& la fin d’avril 1792, et il n’a pas
pour auteur Rouget de Lisle, officier
du gSnie a I’arm^e du Bhin^ mais un
obseur professeur au collSge de Vi
enne (Isfere), I’abbS Pessonneru, qui
I’eerivit pour qu’ il fut chants par
ses elSves lors de la rficejytion dont
furent I’objet & leur arrivfie dans aa
ville, le 14 juillet 1792, les Marseil
lais qui montaient sur Paris pour d6-
fendre I’assemblSe et qui arriverent
juste k temps pour participer h. la
prise des Tuileries, le 10 aofit.
Quelques mois plus tard — le ler
janvier 1794 — I’abbe Pessonneau,
accusfi de mod^rantisme, fitait tra-
duit devant une commission mili-
taire sifigeant S. Lyon et il allait etre
condamne 5, mort lorsqu’ une bande
d’enfants qui se rendaient 4 une
eeremonie patriotique passa sous les
fenetres du tribunal en chantant:
“Nous entrerons dang la carrifere
. . . ” Surpris, l’abb§ laissa trans-
paraitre quelque Emotion.. On lui
en demanda la cause. II Svoqua le
souvenir du 14 juillet 1792, le plus
beau jour de sa vie, et fut acquittfi.
C’est cette anecdote rigouseusement,
qui, aprfes avoir fourni MM. Eene
Jeanne et Pierre Mariel le point de
depart d’une pi&ce radiophonique:
‘ ‘ la SeptiSme Strophe, crfiee le 14
juillet 1937 sur I’antenne de la tour
Eiffel, a fitfi transformee, avec la
collaboration de M. H. Dupuy —
Mazuel, en sc6nario de film. E6alis6
par M. Maurice de Canonge, ce film
montre comment le sentiment de la
patrie nait dans I’&me des jeunes
616ves de I’abbe Pessonneau, dont
trois s’engagent comme tambours et
I’un menrt & Valmy ...”
UNIV. OF SO. CALIF,
PLAYED 18 HOLES
OF eOLF-ONE IM
EACH OF 18 CITIES
-FROM LOS
ANGELES TO
NEW YORK.
i
HE
CARDED
A 7Z-
TWO OVER.
PAR FOR
THE IS ,
HOLES'
Whew upsaxj^ collese
UPPERCLASSMEN SHOOT'AIR
RAID* ALL FRESHMEN IN THE
VICINITY MUST DROP FLAT ON
THE GROUND OR DIVE INTO
A NEARBY BUSH.'
UP TO VOUR. OLD
ILL TEAR YOU UMB/S=
FROWUMB.'
IRCKS.m AU£N
HARRY STELLA.
/«MY FOOTBALL CAPTAIN. AKff>
ALLEN BERGNER..
NAVY'S LEADER., WERE
TCAMWATES WH^N THEy
ATTENDED THE 5AME
HIGH vPCHOOL IM
KANKAKEE^ H-UNOIS.'
MUSIC NOTES
RADIO PROGRAMS
Saturday afternoon Lily Pons will
sing the title role in the broadcast
of Lucia Di Lammermoor over WJZ
at 1:55 P. M.
Saturday evening the N. B. C.
Symphony will present the following
program from 10-11:30:
Scheherazade Rimsky-Korsakof
Canto Di Palude Rossellini
Sinfonia Italiana Salvicci
Pines of Rome Respighi
The weekly Sunday-afternoon
broadcast will again be heard this
week at 3 P. M. over WABC. Alex
ander Brailowsky will be guest so
loist. The program is as follows:
Overture to Beatrice and
Benedict Berlioz
Piano Concerto in E Minor Chopin
Rondo for Orchestra Zador
Suite from Le Coq D’or
Rimsky-Korsakof
MUSIC HOUR
The school of music had its first
mu.sic hour of the new semester yes
terday afternoon, February 1, at
4:00 o’clock. The program, consist
ing mainly of modern numbers, was
presented by piano, organ, and voice
students. It was as follows:
Dance of the Gnomes Dennee
Margaret Leinbach
My Heart Ever Faithful Bach
Becky Nifong
Heartsease - Beach
Muriel Brietz
Prelude and Fugue in D minor
Bach
Catherine Walker
The Fairies are Exquisite Dancers
Debussy
Helen Savage
Oh Thou Billowy Harvest Field
Rachmaninoff
Louise Norris
Cascade Sowerby
Sarah Linn
Rosace (Rose Window) Mulet
Elizabeth Tuten
Sun-Drenched Palms (from
Florida S'uite) Sowerby
Leonore Rice
CHAPEL PREVIEWS
Tuesday, February 6 —
Reece Thomas will conduct a
devotional.
Thursday —
Miss Hixon.
Priday —
Dr. Rondthaler.
YV.C A.
V
NEWS
Mr. Myers from Chapel Hill will
si>eak at 5 P. M., in the recreation
room of Bitting, Friday, February
9th.
Vespers will be as usual 6:30 P. M.
Sunday evening in the Old Chapel.
Sarah Burrell spoke on Thursday
night at Evening Watch. We cer
tainly enjoyed the meeting; we hope
she returns soon again.
Mrs. Holt Haywood held the sec
ond of the Ferdinand Bull Sessions
last night at 6:45 P. M.
CLARK GABLE HAS
ANOTHER FAN
Yes, Miss Susan Myrick “fell for”
Clark Gable out in Hollywood. ‘ ‘ He
is even nicer than Rhett Butler, and
Rhett Butler — well - - - ”
Miss Myrick, who was technical
director for “Gone With The Wind,”
spoke to an audience of over three
hundred Wednesday afternoon in the
Robert E. Lee Ballroom. She looked
very HollyTvoodish in a black and
white printed dress, a black and
white hat , and a corsage of garden
ias. But it seems Hollywood hasn’t
changed Miss Myrick very much.
But Miss Myriek very definitely
changed Hollywood. At least she
kept Hollywood from making
blunders that “might have caused
the South to secede again.”
Said the lady: “I was scandal
ized to hear ‘you all’ going back
and forth across the lot. I was fright
ened to death thinking of all the
various accents there are in the south
and how difficult it was going to be
to find one accent that would be gen
eral. But there is a general south
ern accent ... it is that of the cul
tured southerner who is putting her
best foot forward and thinking of
how she is talking,”
Everyone who has seen “Gone
With The Wind” says that Miss My
rick has done what all southerners
have wished could be done to give
the world at large the correct ver
sion of the southern accent.
Miss Myrick won the audience
with her first sentence. And it’s not
a bad start (if it worksl).
“If any of you happened to hear
me at luncheon or over the radio to-
•^ay, you may leave the room. I’m
like the southern girl ■Who couldn’t
change her line but who could al
ways find a new man!”
Now we can’t wait to see “Gone
With The Wind.” (and neither can
the rest of Winston-Salem, oh, the
rush at the box-oftieel)
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view