North Carolina Newspapers

    • Voter Urges an Open Mind
• Editor Pleads for Editorials
• Student Questions Honor Roll
^ Rodzinski to Conduct
• Strings to Broadcast
• Home Ecs to Model
Z 541
VOL. XXIII.
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ MARCH 26, 1943.
Number 1 8.
SS I R-S- and y elections feature
K McGEACHY FOR 1943-44
Class presidents’?? Ah yes, there
are siieh things . . . and the begin
ner: l)lond, blue-eyed AILEEN SE
VILLE. Last night your reporter
searched frantically for the first of
these three women, and she finally
found Seville, slumped over the
bridge table, dragging on a Philip
Morris . . . catching that moment’s
relaxation between lessons. Seville,
who hails from Statesville, is a dou
ble major: sociology and economics.
She eatehes time, however, to work
actively on both the Annual and
SALEMITB business staffs . . . And
frequently she ia found in the gym
enjoying her favorite sport, badmin
ton. Yes, an unusually well-round
ed person is the on-coming Senior
president.
And from the smoke house up to
the chaos that reigned supreme on
on second floor of Clewell, roamed
your reporter in search of NELL
DENYING. A brief knock ... a
polite: “Come in” . . . And there
sat blue-eyed Nell, of the hair in
curlers and the glasses, bent over
her sociology book. This Albemarle
Salemite, though interested in hock
ey and basketball, is a good stud
ent majoring in both English and
History. Slie promised to lead not
only the Juniors but the whole cam
pus next year.
And last but not least, j'our re
porter reached the bottom floor in
search of LOIS WOOTEN . . . only
to discover that said Salemite was
in third. So up three flights to
an obscure room . . . there, in the
dimmest light imaginable, ,sat Lois
pouring over a math book. She con
sented to come into the hall (the
RALEMJTE| supposedly scooped this
election) to answer questions. There
on the top of the third flight, brown-
eyed Lois of the smoke-house
Wootens, confessed that she was the
one who made some goals to defeat
the Juniors last Tuesday, that she
loved tennis, that she liked home
town Kinston, that she planned to
major in math and to minor in
English, that she had at last hit be
neath the surface in her Ilousman
term paper, that she liked working
on the SALEMITE, and that she
See—WOOTEN—Page 4.
Here is the news you’ve been
waiting for ... V. V. Garth has
been, ele'cted I. E. 8. President for
1943-44.
Yes, Salem’s own V. V. . . . V.
V. from Hickory, who entered Sialem
as just another Freshman in 1941.
Yet there was something unusual
about her — with her tiny “doll-
like” figure, her appealing face, her
congenial nature, her warm hefart,
and a tremendous amount of poise.
As many of you know she is the
second in the line of Garths — pre
ceeded by Peggy and followed by
Greta. She’s majoring in Primary
Education and expe'cts to teach un
til Jimmy comes marching home
again.
Throughout her three years at Sa
lem, V. V. has been outstanding on
the campus . . . popular with all of
the' girls . . . addicted to bridge
. . . and well representative of what
an I. E. S. President should be:
neat, courteous, amiable, cheerful,
poised, dignified, and understand
ing.
AVell, there you have it in a nut
shell ... V. V. from Hickory walk-
cfd off with the election and into the
title of I Represent Salem.
KATHERINE McGEACHY
/IKGINIA GAETH
DEHYDRATED
NEWS REVIEW
SEWERS MODEL
OWNJASHIONS
Heave out me hearties! Set your
self up to a treat by coming next
Wednesday at 7:00 p. m. to Old
Cliapol. At that time the Freshmen
and Sophomore home economics
clothing classes will have a cloth
ing exhibit of the garments that
they have made this year. Various
housecoats, smocks, wool skirts,
blouses, dickeys; wool, silk, and vel
veteen dresses will be shown. Each
garment that will be shown has
been made by the girl who will
model it.
Don’t miss it. We guarantee an
evening well spent.
Rodzinski Returns
for Second Concert
“Cleveland Orchestra Makes Ex-
huberant Debut,” “Superb Music by
Rodzinski,” “Concert Again Shows
Rodzinski’s Magic,” “Cleveland
Orchestra Gets I'hree Thundering
|l
WHAT, WHEN,
WHERE
#
Ovations” . . . such have been the
headlines that have followed the
triumphant tours of the Cleveland
Symphony and Conductor Artur
Rodzinski from Michigan to New
York and from New York to Char-
See—RODZINSKI—Page 3.
WlIAT: Cleveland Orchestra
WHEN: Tonight at 8:30
WJTERE: Reynolds Auditorium
WHAT: Salem String Orchestra
WHEN: Sunday, 9:00 p. m.
WHERE: Memorial Hall, W8JS
WHAT:' French Club' Mebting
WilTEN: Tuesday, 7:00 p. jjj_
WHERE: Bitting’s Basement
WHAT: Winston-Salem Teachers’
College
WHEN: Tuesday’s chapel hour
WHERE: Memorial Hall
WHAT: L R. S. Tea
WHEN: Wednesday, 3-5:00 p m
WHERE: Bitting’s Living Room
WHAT: Home Ec Flashion Show
WHEN: Wednesday, 7:00 p m
WHERE: Old Chapel
WHAT: Latin Club Meeting
WHEN: Thursday, 7:00 p. m.
WHERE: Sitting’s Basement
AitERICAN FRONT— ’
Beginning Monday, each person in
the United States will have sixteen
ration points per week to spend on
steaks, butted, lard, cheese or canned
fish. For the whole group of these
foods, the average ration cost per
pound will be eight points. A typi
cal budget per person per week
will probably be two pounds of
meat, plus a quarter of a pound of
butter.
EUROPEAN FRONT—
Heavy bombers of the U. S. Eighth
Army Air Force destroyed 52 Ger-
man fighteffs in last week’s raid
on Vegesack, shot down 20, and
damaged 23.
PACIFIC FRONT—
Field Marshall Wavell’s forces
have failed in four attempts to
crush Japanese detfenses on the tip
f Mayu Peninsula in Burma. Jap
anese planes have caused some ma
terial damage to th0 American air
field on Guadalcanal.
RUSSIAN FRONT—
The Red Army has stormed and
captured an important defense line
above Dukhovshchina, only 30 miles
northeast of the German central
front bastion of Smolensk.
AFRICAN FRONT—
Tlie British forces and the Eighth
Army encircled Rommel on the Ma-
reth line. Rommel is now trying to
break through the encirclement and
is causing the British to stay on the
alert.
RIDENHOUR BEGINS
WEEKLY MUSIC HOUR
STRINGS NEXT
OF MUSICALES
The Salem Music Department con
tinues to show its enthusiasm in
contributing to the war effort, as
it presents another in the series of
weekly SHinday night broadcasts
“From the Salem Music Hall.”
This week the String Orchestra un
der the direction of Miss Hazel
Read will be presented, featuring as
violin soloist, talented fourteen-
year-old Barbara Ann Benson.
For its selections the orchestra
has chosen three movements, Alle
gro. Andante and Finale, of the
“Concerto Grosso in G minor,” by
Geminiani; and an. unusual arrange
ment of “Pavane;” by Ravel for
string orchestia and harp. The first
movement of Mendelssohn’s “Con
certo in E minor” will be played by
Barbara Ann Benson, with Laura
Emily Pitts at the piano.
This pJomises to be a very en
joyable program. The time is Sun
day night at 9 o’clock; and the
place. Memorial Hall. The invita
tion to attend the performance in
person is extended to everyone.
Katherine McGeachy of Fayette
ville, defeated Mary Lewis in the
election for Y W. C. A. President,
this afternoon.
Kathjerine’s middle name could
well have been Dependability; for
she has proven her worth in many
ways. For example, who was the
girl with the vivid originality for
planning and making the “Y”
Carnival a glorious success? Who
was the girl behind the pains taking
task of raising the World’s Student
Service Fund Pledge? And who is
the capibl© and active President
of the popular International Relat
ion Club? That girl could be none
other than the smiling, good-nature
‘ ‘ Geachy. ’ ’
Blond, blue^eyed Katherine is a
hard-working and conscientious stu
dent. She likes however her good
time, and “works while she works
and plays while she plays.” Her
easy-going nature and pleasing per
sonality have won her many friends
. and she is a true friend; for
loyalty and kindness are second
nature to her. She always has a
ready smile and a cheery hello for
every one at any time.
So students, you have Katherine
McGreachy—a hard worker, a friend
indeed-for your 1943-44 Y leader.
Once again it was a Thursday aft
ernoon; and an audience composed
chiefly of musicians and a few aca
demic students and interested
townspeople, awaited the striking of
four o’clock for the entrance of the
first performer, Nancy Ridenhour.
Nancy skillfully played “Harmon
ica Player,’’ by Guion, a piece in
the modern jazz idiom, with synco
pation and all the trimmings. Norma
Rhodes (another Marian Gary, just
you watch!), sang in a clear, well-
controlled voice “Poupee Valsante”
by Poldini-La Forge. At the organ,
Betty Withers gave a splendid per
formance of the quiet, serene “Oe-
di.cace, ” by Bonnet. Nymph and
Shepherds,” by Purcell, an unusu
See—MUSIC HOUR—Page 3.
MISS DOLCH HELPS
THE POSTER-MflKERS
Attention Salemites! You are all
invited to come to the art studio
for help in individual advertising
for clubs or other activities.
Anyone wishing to make a poster
will have the assistance of Miss
Dolch and her paint, spray guns
and letter stencils. She will be glad
to help all publicity chairmen and
committees advertise any important
campus events.
Quantity plus quality is easy to
attain with stencils! Effective ad
vertising is not difficult.
NMNELLHART
spans
A dark clad figure, slightly hunch
ed, scurrying across the campus . . .
not quite what we’d expect of the
Seniors’ ‘ ‘ most wonderful man on
earth” ... he whom they’d had
the opportunity of hearing as Fresh
men and whom they hadn’t finished
praising even yet. But then we
heard him speak . . . we found his
voice intriguing in its intimacy or
compelling in its force ... we
watched him talk with squinted blue
I. R. S. PLANS TEA
HONORING ACADEMY
WJednesday afternoon the I. R. S.
is going to give a formal tea in
honor of the Academy Seniors. The
college stndent body and the facul
ty are invited to come to the liv
ing-room of Louisa Bitting Building
for some good conversation and
some good refreshments.. Remember
Wednesday from 3 to 5 p. m. in
the living-room of Louisa Bitting
Building.
eyes, with de!pened frown lines,
with exquisitely graceful gesticula
tions ... we scrutinized his side
burns, the scar on his left cheek . . .
and, most of all, we foun dourselves
irrevocably fascinated with his
ideas.
Dr. Hornell Hart has been here
since Monday . . . packing the base
ment of Bitting with utterly spell
bound audiences . . . gently ex
pounding theories involving the
“plus-plus quarter,” “abundant
life,” scales of happiness and mis
ery that range from plus 10,000 to
minus 10,000. We have followed
him through proofs of a faith for
“historys greatest crisis” ... a
faith that will not be discouraged
by second world wars or even third
world wars, if they have to be
fought ... a faith that will not
crumble with the loss of friends or
relatives or prospective husbands
. a faith that will strengthen us
S’ee—DR. HART—Page 4.
    

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