North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Four.
HORSE SHOW
IS TOMORROW
Don’t forget that Saturday aft
ernoon at four is the time for the
beginning of an interesting after
noon at/Salem. Tor the first time
in Salem’s history there will be a
horse show on the campus. It will
be held on the lower end of the
hockey field and the sight of horses
racing, trotting, cantering, and go
ing through all of their paces will
be quite a spectacle. In addition to
this tlie relay race will probably af
ford the spectacle. In addition to
this the relay race will probably af
ford quite some amusement. The
participants will be from the col
lege and academy and awards will
be given for each event. A silver
cup will be presented in chapel to
the rider who displays the most im
provement and who has shown the
most interest.
THE SALEMITE
CLUB NEWS
Latin
The annual picnic of the Latin
Club was held Wednesday afternoon
at the fireplace on the hill. When
the guests arrived, a treasure hunt
was enjoyed with Mary* Ellen Byrd
and Elizabeth Gudger finding the
prize. After supper, officers for
' next year were elected as follows:
President Marjorie Beavis; Vice-
President, Dorothy Farrell; Secre
tary, Mary Heefner; Treasurer, Dor
othy Kiser. The meeting concluded
with the singing of “T'he Star-Span-
gled Banner” in Latin.
German
Rabbi Rosenthal, former internee
in a German Concentration Camp
talked to the German Club Wednes
day night on “Not the Present
Germany but the Germany That
Will Never Die.”
After his address the new officers
were elected as follows: Barbara
Wjeir, president; Mary Pormy-
Duval, secretary-treasurer; and
Dorothy Firrell, program chairman.
International Relations
The results of the election of In
ternational R'elations Club officers
for 1943-44 on Friday were as fol
lows:
Mary Lou Langhorne, president;
Elizabeth Bernhardt, vice-president;
Frances Crowell, secretary; and
Adair Evans, treasurer.
TENNIS AND GOLF
Competition between individuals
and classes will be at its height, and
tennis rackets and golf clubs will
be swinging right and left, for both
the tennis and golf tournaments are
being played within the next few
days.
In the golf tournament each class
will have several girls play eight
holes on the Salem pourse. The two
girls with the lowest scores will en
ter as their class representatives.
These girls from each class, will then
play at the Reynold’s golf course.
The class which has the lowest score
there will be the winner of the tour
nament.
In the tennis tournament between
individual contestants, the follow
ing twenty girls signed up for the
first four rounds: Mildred Butner,
Treva Miller, Lois Wooten, Barbara
Whittier, Joyce Wooten, Mary Stew
art Snider, Peggy Bollin, Mary Lib
Rand, Betty Vanderbilt, Lucy Farm
er, Joy Flanagan, Peggy Nimocks,
Jean Fulton, Becky Candler, Kath
erine Manning, Mary Lou Stack,
Margery Craig, Luanne Davis, and
Mary Margaret Struven, Ann Brown.
Brown.
All rounds must be ployed by Tues
day morning, for the winner of the
ournament will receive a cup, pre
sented by Mr. Monte Cohen, at the
last chapeL
—DEHYDRATED—
Italian editor complains that peace
terms were not specified.
WAR BDIVDS
WHAT, WHEN,
WHERE
The Women’s Auxiliary Volunteer
Emergency Service, more familiar
ly known as the WAVES, has been
established as a part of our Navy.
They are doing a great work and
relieving many men from office to
active service.
ON THE RUSSIAN FRONT—
Russians continue raiding German
communications and supply centers
to disrupt Nazi offensive plans,
causing damage at Bryansk, Dniep-
eropctrovsk and Kremenchung. Ku-
ban figjiting continues. Germans
reported massing big tanks in Bel-
gorad and Orel sector for offensive
to neutralize Russian army before
Allies can open second front. Ac
tivity flared on the Leningrad
front Wednesday, Moscow reporting
destruction of Nazi defense posi
tions. Further fighting reported in
Novorossisk sector.
3N THE PACIFIC FRONT—
Army spokesman at Washington
says Japanese base of Kiska in the
Aleutians will be next American of
fensive goal. IJ. g. Navy denies
Tokyo report that Americans used
gas on Attu; Jap radio says pitched
battle underway for Attu in appar
ent preparation to announce Ameri
can victory; TJ. S. subs sink four
Jap ships. Navy announced Wed
aesday that American fighting men
have broken through the main Jap
anese defense line on Attu Island
and that two American columns now
are converging for the final attack
to wrest the island from the Nip
ponese invaders. General Mac-
Arthur denounced Japanese as bar
barians for sinking of Australian
hospital ship Centaur with loss of
299 lives. There were no wounded
aboard; the ship was brightly illum
inated. Only 64 persons were saved,
including only on% of the dozen
nurses aboard.
Americans on Attu surround Jap
anese force for unconditional sur
render or annihilation.
BASKETBALL HONORS
ARE ANNOUNCED
It may seem a little out of season
to be talking about Basketball, but
not on this important occasion. In
case you missed Miss Averill’s an
nouncement, the following girls were
made members of the Varsity team:
juniors, Mildred Butner and Sarah
Sands; freshmen, Elizabeth McLen
don, Achsah Shore, Peggy Wither-
ington and Lois Wooten.
Elected to sub-varsity were Mary
Lib Rand, senior; Erleen Lawson,
junior, Mary Lucy Baynes, Mary
Ellen Byrd, Joy Flanagan, Mary
Stewart Snider, Edith Stovall, and
Joyce Wooten, sophomores; and
Martha Humbert, Ann Jones, and
Frances Sullivan, freshmen.
WHAT: Horse Show
WHEN: 4:00 P. M. Saturday
WHERE: Athletic Field
WHAT: French Club Picnic.
WHEN: After Exams Sat.
WHERE: At Dr. Downs’s.
WHAT: Y Vespers—Miss Dolch
WHEN; 6:45 P. M.—Sunday
WHERE: Old Chapel
WHAT: Required Chaj>el
WHEN: 10:20 A. M. I’uesday
WHERE: Memorial Hall
WHAT: Reading Day
WHEN: Thursday, May 27tli
WHAT: Swimming Meet
WHEN: Saturday night, May 29.
WHERE: SVimming Pool
Cost of a WAVE uniform, exclu
sive of accessories, is approximate
ly $137.35. This includes suit, skirt,
hat, overcoat, raincoat and service
bag. Your purchase of War Bonds
helps pay for the uniforms for these
patriotic women. Buy War Bonds
every payday^ with at least ten per
cent of your income.
Paschal Shoe Repair Co.
We Also Dye Shoes Any Color
“Best In Our Line”
Prompt Call and Delivery Service
219 W. 4th St. DIAL 4901
PERFECT
PRINTING
PLATES
PIEDMONT
ENCRAViNC CO.
WIN/TON-JALEM
engraved
Invitations — Announcements
Calling’ Cards — Stationery
H. T. Hearn Engraving Co.
632 W. POtJRTH STBEET
ON THE AMERICAN FRONT—
FBI chief Hoover urges Americans
to be on the lookout for a fresh
crop of Nazi saboteurs soon to try
to enter,the TJ. S. Among the issues
to be decided by Roosevelt and
Churchill is that of a new Allied su
preme commander for the invasion
of Europe. Roosevelt tells Chiang
and Stalin new victories can be ex
pected on both Eastern and Western
fronts. The House voted down the
Senate’s modified Ruml tax plan
after President said he would veto
Jill if passed. Ickes tells John L.
lewis he must recognize the War
Labor Board.
John L. Lewis asked A. F. of L.
Thursday to readmit the U. M. tV.
—MUSIC—
Hansel and Gretel” was given in
the early spring with the aid of the
voice students and various civic
organizations. The opera was pre
sented four times and received much
acclaim and praise.
The patriotic song contest resulted
in a grand new song, “The Waves
Roll In,” by Marian Gary and L'in-
dy Stokes, and a recital of student
compositions was presented during
National Music Week. Many re
citals have taken place, and modern
music has been given more recogni
tion and emphasis than in previous
years.
Thus the Music School has enjoyed
a profitable and extremely active
season. Much credit for its in
creased contribution is due to Dr.
Vardell and Mr. Bair. To them
go the highest praise and admiration
for a task notably achieved, and
sincere thanks for their continuous
interest and inspiration.
RADIO PROGRAM
War
All times listed are Sastem
Time
Sunday, May 30
3:00 PM New York Philharmonic
—Symphony — Bruno Walter con
ducting — CBS
7:30 PM Inner Sanctum Myster
ies—BLU.
9:00 PM Radio Reader’s Digest—
Conrad Nagel and guests—CBS.
Monday, May 31
4:00 PM Your Home-Front Re
porter—Fletcher Wiley, Frank Par
ker—CBS.
7:30 PM It Pays to Be Ignorant
—Tom Howard, George Shelton—
MBS.
10:00 PM Sfereen Guild Players
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne CBS.
10:30 PM Three Ring Time — Guy
Lombardo’s orchestra, Ogden Nash
Tuesday, June 1
7:30 PM American Melody Hour
—Conrad Thibault, baritone—CBS.
8:30 PM A1 Jolson—Monty Wool
ley Show — Jo Stafford, vocalist
CBS’,
9:00 PM Burns and Allen Show
Paul Whiteman’s orchestra—CBS
Friday, May 21,194S
SOFTBALL
Softball season has really revealed
new talents this spring. Our most
feminine lassies have displayed ro
bust tendencies never before guess
ed at. It’s amazing to us how they
managed to conceal them for so
long!
Tuesday the juniors, impressed
with their new senior standing,
jaunted out to the athletic field de
termined not to be conquered by
their little sisters, the freshmen.
Lady Luck took a hand in affairs,
and the freshmen edged the juniors
out 11 to 9 after a close game from
the first inning to the last.
Midst whooping and hollering
which would have done the Chero-
kees justice those rusty antiques
(?), the seniors, came racing across
the field ready for action on Wed
nesday evening. After a short
practice period the old and the new
(seniors and freshmen) met in
mortal combat. With pitcher Stucky
complaining of being maliciously hit
by her rivals a4id a staunch cheer
ing section for the seniors, the fresh
men seemed to be the underdogs.
With Sullivan as freshman pitcher,
however, the creaky joints of the
seniors were soon limbered up and
a fast and exciting game resulted.
The final score was freshmen; 26,
seniors: 10.
Y VESPERS SUNDAY
Sunday evening at 6:45 in the Old
Chapel Miss Dolch will be in charge
of “Y” Vespers. With music as a
background she will show an ex
cerpt from Walt Disney’s “Fan
tasia” which is in technicolor.
Other pictures — appropriate paint
ings and artistic photographs, scenes
from Life and Art — will be shown
aecomi)anied by music.
MORRIS SERVICE
Next To Carolina Theater
GRILLED SANDWICHES
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
Compliments of
i. R. THOMAS
ICE & COAL CO.
TWIN CITV
lODY OEANINO COl
DIAL 7106
612 West Fourth St.
TRAOC'MARK
MILK
SELECT E
D
AIRIES
ICE CREAM
MAY TIME
IS
WHITE SHOE TIME
AT
BELCHERS, Inc.
nissen bldg.
SALEMITES
tJP TOWN MEETING PLACE
THE ANCHOR CO.
“The Shopping Center”
PICCADILLY 6RILL
The Most Up-To-Date
Restanrant in the South
415 W. 4th street
VOCLER SERVICE
Ambulance Funeral Directors
Dependable for More Than 84 Years
DIAL 6101
MUSIC OF ALL PUBLISHEES
MASTEEWOEK EECOEDINGS
MUSICAL INSTEUMENTS
ACCESSOEIES
Brodt-Separk Music Co.
503 W. 4th St. TeL 3-2241
STANDARD
BUILDING 8e LOAN
ASSOCIATION
236 N. Main St.—Winston-Salem
New Gabardine Suits
in Bright Colors
Sizes 10-18
$24.95
at the
THE IDEAL DRY
GOODS CO.
West Fourth St.
STERLING SILVER
SALEM SPOONS
Make Grand Gifts
$1.00
Plus tax
ARDEN FARM STORE
Across the Square from Salem College.
We ^ant to wish all students good fortune on their
examinations and a very pleasant vacation.
To the graduates—we wish them success in thd years
StS“^’ and hope that they will come back to visit us
mb. E. D. SNAVELY
MES. J. P. PERRYMAN
/ VIRGINIA HOLTON
MRS. WARREN
SALEM BOOK STORE
    

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