North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Six
TH£ SALtMITt
Monday, February 12, 1973
Winston Has Entertainment Student Teachers
For All Salem Students
by Kathy Bacon
Staff Reporter
Most students are unaware of
the places in Winston-Salem that
are available for nighttime enter
tainment. Several students have
been to the newer night spots in
town and have rated them for
price, entertainment, and atmos
phere.
One of the newer places in
town is the Atilla’s Cave in the
Downtowner basement. The
prices are somewhat expensive
at $3 per person, but there is a
‘Happy Hour’ on weekdays at
4 p.m. that is fun for college stu
dents. During the Happy Hour
beer costs 25 cents along with
free hors d’oeuvres.
Also, girls are allowed in the
Cave free before 9 p.m. Mondays
through Thursdays. Plenty of
music is at the Cave, especially
beach music, and it is all live.
The Cave has engaged the Em
bers, Georgia Prophets, True Di
rection, and the Drifters.
The Salem students rating the
Cave said that it is a good place
to go for fun. But people have
to watch out for truckers’ con
ventions occasionally.
Opinions of Uncle Sam’s on
Jonestown Road is less favor
able. This is the Winston-Salem
equivalent of Myrtle Beach’s
Beach Club, only nicer. The
large warehouse boasts such
groups as the Embers, Georgia
Prophets, Cornelius Bros., the
Spinners, Dennis Yost and the
Classics IV and Martha Reeves.
Uncle Sam’s sometimes offers
ladies night. Sometimes every
one in the club gets free beer and
a hot dog. Prices are rather steep
otherwise. They are $3 per per
son and $4 per person for special
groups. But the high prices fail
to keep rednecks away.
A third nightspot, the Big
Cougar, receives varied reactions
from Salem students. Students
said that “it isn’t great, but like
most anywhere, it can be fun if
you’re with a lot of friends.”
One deal at the relatively
Wildfire
in the south.
There’s no
future in it.
Nearly halt of all forest fires in
the South are set on purpose.
By woods arsonists kids out for
a thrill or grown men carrying out
a grudge with matches.
If you d like to help
prevent arson
report it'
lontr.hulCrt lor ''f’J ■'
the public Koort
Help Prevent Forest Fires in the South
new Cougar is the free college
night on Sundays. For those
without college identification on
Sundays the price is reasonable,
around $1.50 or two dollars.
This is the regular price of ad
mission. This pays for the live
entertainment and occasional
free beer (from 8-10 p.m.) also.
The Kona Kai Lounge at the
Sheraton Motel at Thruway dif
fers from the other three night
clubs. This is more the type of
place frequented by parents who
enjoy dining and dancing on the
weekends. A live combo plays on
weekends and they keep the
dance floor occupied.
No cover charge is there, but
patrons must buy dinner and/or
drinks.
Most Salemites know the Tro-
py Room from the past. It has
been changed to the Safari Room
and is across from the Coliseum.
It still ranks high on the list for
good sandwiches and beer, with
emphasis on the roast beef sand
wiches. The Safari Room con
tains a television that is loud
enough to hear, unlike the two
T.V.’s in the ever-popular Ta
vern on the Green.
Students think the Tavern is
declining. But Salem girls still
can recognize fellow students.
among the crowd. The food is
good but expensive. The ‘genu
ine country ham sandwiches’ are
highly recommended. Although
the Tavern doesn’t have live mu
sic, there are plenty of people
and beer to compensate.
Beer is also the crowd pleaser
at the Holiday Inn West Happy
Hour. At this Holiday Inn near
the Pancake House, beer sells
for 25 cents on Mondays through
Saturdays from 5-7 p.m. Free
popcorn accompanies the beer.
It is difficult to separate night
spots from popular eating places
in Winston-Salem. Simo’s behind
Groves Stadium is a great place
to go. They serve the coldest
beer in town in frozen mugs.
Simo’s spaghetti is also a crowd
favorite.
Fat Mama’s, officially known
as Louis and Bill Bell’s serves
hungry Salemites. Fat Mama’s
is open all night, which accounts
for some Salem interest. If any
idea of clientele can be obtained
by the music, keep in mind that
the jukebox carries such favor
ites as Merle Haggard and Tam
my Wynette.
Another eating spot open all
night is Coalson’s Drive Inn, lo
cated near the airport. Coalson’s
food is better than Fat Mama’s
and it is gaining in popularity.
Warning: the Winston-Salem cops
gather there in the early morning
hours, so don’t plan anything un
savory.
Food is definitely the attrac
tion at Pollirosa’s because the
food is home cooked and abun
dant. The entrance fee is $2 per
person for all-you-can-eat of a
large food selection. Pollirosa,
off Highway 52 North at the To-
baccoville exit, is unique because
the restaurant is part of a coun
try home. People must pass
through the living room to get to
the eating area.
Pollirosa is open Wednesday-
Sunday, but go early to beat the
crowds. Don’t pass up the live
Saturday night entertainment.
A barn adjoining the house has
fiddling sessions by locals and
the lively bluegrass deserves re
cognition.
PREVENT FUTURE SHOCK!!
join a career counseling group now
call Dianne High
Counseling Center
723-7961
X278
RESTAURANT
PEPPER BUILDING
WINSTON-SALEM. NORTH CAROLINA
MAKE YOUR SUMMER COUNT!
Camp counseling offers you challenge and growth
while you offer companionship and new skills to
younger girls. If you have initiative, openheartedness,
emotional maturity, creativity, excellent health, and
you would enjoy a simplified out door life, write me
TODAY. Skills needed at YWCA Camp Betty Hastings
include, swimming, canoeing, tennis, archery, rhythms,
crafts, nature lore, gymnastics, group games, drama,
writing, and camperaft.
Salaries for the June 12-July 29 season start at
$175 plus food and lodging.
MS. ELLEN YARBOROUGH
YWCA, 1201 Glade St.
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27104
Tuesday, FeD. 13, Salem’s
three Miss Student Teachers will
be presented in a special assem
bly in Hanes Auditorium at 1; 15
p.m.The women have been selec
ted from the student teachers
at Salem College this past semes
ter.
A panel of 20 judges from the
Salem Education department,
SNEA have chosen the three
winners. These student teachers
have completed their require
ments for a degree in education,
including student teaching in the
Winston-Salem public school sy
stem.
THE VILLAGE YARN SHOP
626 S. Main St.
Across the Square
Monday - Friday 10 A.M. - 4 P.M.
PETER PAN
RESTAURANT
Corner Marshall and Walnut Sts.
OPEN 6:30-9:00 PM-SAT. 6:30-2:00 PM
SERVING GOOD HOME COOKING
PLATE LUNCHES
724-3311 New Management
Salem Book Store
"... On the Square"
We invite you to visit our
other locations also.
ELLIS-ASHBURN, STATIONER, INC.
NORTHSIDE SHOPPING CENTER
SHERWOOD FOREST PLAZA
Ws been
Reznick's for Records
For Years
TAPES - SHEET MUSIC - RECORDS
DOWNTOWN
440 N. IIBERTY
THRUWAY SHOPPING CENTER
OPEN NITES 'TIL 9:00
OUR THRUWAY STORE HAS A COMPLETE STOCK OF
POSTERS, BLACK LITES, and PATCHES
MORRIS SERVICE
Coffee Shop
4th and Marshall 722-6634
"Serving Delicious Food For Over 40 Years"
Try Our Salads, Kosher Sandwiches, atsd Spaghetlil
TajuMo
COME SEE US
GIFTS — POSTERS — INCENSE — NOVELTIES
    

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