North Carolina Newspapers

    Monday,
February 19, 1973
TH£ SALtMITt
Page Three
ami
oquy
standing on your
OWN FEET
by Colonel Harland Sanders
(Now 82 years old, and still
an increasingly familiar figure all
over the United States, Colonel
Harland Sanders is the famous
creator of “finger-lickin’-good ”
Kentucky Fried Chicken. An
avid philanthropist for many
years, he has repeatedly dona
ted large sums of money to cha
rity, colleges, childrens’ hospi
tals, orphanages, and youth or
ganizations. Just recently, the
Colonel has been honored by
both the Salvation Army and the
National Council of Christians
and Jews for his efforts in the
field of human relations.)
Everyone of you is looking
forward to standing on his own
feet and making his own way in
the world. But before you can
stand on your own feet, you
must have something more in
your head than the desire to
stand up. You need to know
enough to keep your balance.
That is why young people go to
school and university and go to
church. In this changing world,
it is not enough to have in your
head nothing more than there
was yesterday.
What have you that is parti
cular to yourself; a point of dis
tinction, something in which you
are proficient? That is the fea
ture to display and develop. The
thing to do is find your best qua
lity and bring it to maturity.
Thomas Fuller said this in a book
he published in 1640. “Good is
not good when proceeding from
them from whom far better is
expected.”
To choose, or select, or de
cide a man needs standards by
which to judge. He may be ig
norant about how to do a thing,
but that will be cured by learn
ing and by trying to acquire the
skills needed for his particular
job.
One who is striving to be
great in whatever line of endea
vor he has chosen will find satis
faction in doing so with his own
natural qualities and vitality ra
ther than in dependence on oth
er people. By combining indus
try, enthusiasm, knowledge and
ability, a man will become out
standing.
The firmness with which you
stand and the success that at
tends your effort depends upon
the intensity of your purpose
and your perserveranee.
It has been said that 90% of
the world’s failures are quitters.
A man has to believe in him
self. Standing on your own feet
means having confidence in your
ability to do some task, the out
come of which is desirable but
not certain. Self confidence may
be promoted by finding or crea
ting an interest in something a-
bout it. This is the opposite of
the wishy-washy habit of copy
ing the actions and mannerisms
of other people.
To stand on your own feet
does not mean being indifferent
or neutral. A vigorous construc
tive attitude is needed. No
bright idea and no great achieve
ment will be brought forth by a
negative fault-finding mind.
Nothing worthwhile is gained
without effort. One needs to
have a vital spirit behind one’s
work.
Men in both public and pri
vate enterprise may be moved
to make money, gain fame, or
wield power, but there is a
fourth aspiration more reward
ing than any of these; “The de
sire to do a good job, to make
some contribution to the ad
vancement of their industry or
profession. To make mistakes is
far more honorable than to es
cape making them through ne
ver moving.
A wise man regards his pre
sent situation as only a sketch of
a picture he must finish. If he
does not try to do a little more
or a little better than he can do
easily, he will never learn the
best that he is capable of doing.
You would be a wise man to
not allow yourself to become
elated by the things you come
to possess. When a man becomes
eminent, he should carry his hon
ors with gentleness and the ab
sence of arrogance. Guard a-
gainst allowing success to go to
your head. The tightness of
your halo may cause headaches.
It is comparatively easy to pros
per by trickery, the violation of
confidence, oppression of the
weak, sharp practices, cutting
corners-all of these methods
that we are so prone to palliate
and condone as business shrewd
ness. It is difficult to prosper by
keeping promises, the deliverance
of value in goods, in services and
in deeds-and in meeting of so-
called shrewdness with sound
merit and good ethics.
The easy way is efficacious
and speedy-the hard way ardu
ous and long. But as the clock
ticks, the easy way becomes
harder and the hard way be
comes easier. And as the calen
dar records the years, it becomes
increasingly evident that the
easy way rests hazardously upon
shifting sands, whereas the hard
way builds solidly a foundation
of confidence that cannot be
swept away.
Female Smokers
Considered Nasty
By Charles B. Towns,
New York, N.Y.
Civilized man has been smok
ing since the days of King James,
but it is only recently that its use
among the respectable women of
this country has been noticeable.
The saddest thing about the use
of tobacco by women is that the
upper classes of society have
placed their unqualified approval
on the use of tobacco by women,
and until this sanction is with
drawn by the same body of
women, there will not only be
no progress made towards the
lessening of this vice among
that class, but there will
be a constant army of recruits
added to the poison squad of
tobacco users.
The woman who permits her
self to drift into habits of this
land soon loses all self-control
and goes the limit, and it is only
a matter of time, which depends
entirely upon her physical con
stitution, on how long she will
last. There is nothing on earth
she can do that will so surely
bring about her mental and mor
al ruin as the use of tobacco. It
changes her entire mental atti
tude towards life and she lets
down the last bar of reason
and seeks and courts congenial
companionship among other un
fortunates of her class and in
the end it degrades everything m
woman that is worth while, and
in short time the lovely, devoted,
clean wife and mother becomes
negligent of all her womanly du
ties and responsibilities, and if an
alcoholic history has not pre
viously existed it is only a matter
of time when she will also ac
quire that vice. Can you picture ;
a more disgusting human being
than an alcoholic and nicotine-
poisoned woman?
No woman puts herself on a
par with man when she indul
ges with him in life’s vices, she
always puts herself beneath him.
There is some hope of saving a
man who may drift into the
taking of drugs and drink but
when a woman takes up drugs
and drink for the sake of dis
sipation the moral hazard is far
greater than among men, and
therefore very few of them in the
end who are ever restored to
normality.
When a woman with a ciga
rette history is brought to me
for help I invariably throw up
both my hands and am frank to
say that we hold out little or no
hope for her regeneration.
If the young women who use
tobacco knew the mental esti
mate in which men hold them,
there would be few tobacco
users among them. They are im
mediately associated with the
morally low,. .. looked upon
with suspicion, and time and
place and circumstances permit
ting, they sooner or later have
to defend their virtue or lose it.
There is no worse case ot
drug havit that has ever come
under my observation than that
of the confirmed female tobacco
user. There is nothing that she
can possibly do that is going to
so surely rob her of her good
looks, of everything in her life
and make up that is pleasing and
fascinating to men-and the men
who tolerate their smoking are
the first to kick them aside for
those who are younger and pret
tier, when the tobacco has
worked its irreparable havoc.
Excerpts from DELAWARE
STATE MEDICAL JOURNAL,
Oct. 1916
Student Discusses
Human Freedom
- by Susan Fauntleroy
Disregard your sex, age, race, and nationality. What is left - a
human! It is my belief, that by God’s will, to be human is to be the
master of your own fate. It is this gift which Women s Lib is all a-
bout. It represents an attempt to make all humans aware - intellect
ually, spiritually, and emotionally - that alternatives to what we
have been led to believe are the “right” ways, do exist. “Roles”
and “proper places,” on the basis of sex differentiation, are out
right contradictions. Our freedom is within each of us, and it is our
responsibility to make use of our freedom. We must examine the
avenues open to us, in order that we may live our lives in the way
that only each of us alone can live them. 1 refer to all humans, for
men are certainly equally entitled and obligated to this FREEDOM
TO BE HUMAN. It is in respect to the attainment of this goal that
I urge each of you to take a stand on the Equal Rights Amend
ment.
The proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution reads
as follows:
“Equality of rights under the law shall not be
denied or abridged by the United States or by any
State on account of sex.”
This does not mean that all laws which distinguish on the basis
of sex would be nullified, but rather would require that the law must
treat men and women equally. Some of the laws with which the
Equal Rights Amendment deals will be discussed below;
1) Property Rights of Married Women.
Special restrictions on property rights of married
women would be invalidated; married women could
engage in business as freely as men and manage their
separate property such as inheritances and earnings.
Did you know that as the law stands now, if you and
your husband own a piece of property, and he wants
to sell it, but you don’t, he has the authority to do
as he wishes without your consent?
2) Alimony, Child Support, and Custody Laws. Present
laws will not be validated. In those states where ali
mony is limited to women, men will be eligible under
the same circumstances as women. The welfare of the
child will be the criterion for child custody as it is
in most states now. Provisions of law giving mothers
(or fathers) preference will be inoperative.
The National Commissioners on Uniform State Laws
recently adopted a Uniform Marriage and Divorce
Act, the terms of which are in accord with the ERA.
It provides for alimony for either spouse (called
“maintenance”), child support obligations for both
spouses in accordance with their means, and the cus
tody of children based on the welfare of the child.
3) The ERA and the Draft, (in reference to a potential
draft which might come with another war). First, it
should be remembered that although women would
be subject to such a draft, in the past, men have been
deferred due to hardships on dependents. So would
women not also receive such deferments? Also, the
military can mean becoming eligible for a number
of benefits, such as the GI Educational Bill. G1 loans
for homes, businesses, GS medical services, Veterans’
mortgage insurance. Employment benefits and Death
benefits.
4) Federal Social Security. The ERA would extend to
widowers of covered women workers the benefits
now provided only to widows of covered men work
ers.
5) Status of the Homemaker. As Congresswoman Dwyer
of New Jersey pointed out, the ERA would not de
mean the role of the housewife, but rather, would
give it new dignity by confirming the equality of
women and her freedom to choose her own life.
6) This has nothing to do with the ERA as such, but 1
think it is interesting to note that North Carolina did
not pass the nineteenth amendment (women's right
to vote) until two years ago! The only reason the
women of North Carolina were allowed to vote was
because of the prevalence of the law in the other
states. If 1 were a resident here, I would not have
stood for that!
These are only a few areas with which the ERA deals but are
among the most controversial ones (alimony and the draft). Thus
far 26 states have ratified the ERA. In a few short weeks, this leps-
lation will be voted on in North Carolina, and many other states, t s
future here is a dim one. The legislators have said repeatedly, that
the younger women are not in favor of it, only the older women,
whom it will not significantly affect. They accuse these older women
of attempting to take away the “protection” ot the younger ones -
us. Will the ERA really take away our protection, or will it restore
THE FREEDOM TO BE HUMAN to all humans?
    

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