North Carolina Newspapers

    Kitlinger Speaks
On REW
Theme and Topics
See Interview, P. 2
THE TWIG
Newspaper of the Students of Meredith College
That Was the
Rush Week
That Was!
See Article, P. 3
Volume XLI
MEREDITH COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C, FEBRUARY 16, 1967
No. 8
President E.
Bruce Heilman signs his first Meredith diplomas for January graduates.
Jane Teague and Rebekah Chapman.
Carroll Commends Meredith,
Challenges Recent Graduates
North Carolina Superintendent of i that "there are some absolute truths
Public Instruction Dr. Charles F.i within the moral •world and that
Carroll commended Meredith Col- j these truths are fixed at all times,
lege and other similar liberal arts These truths can be used eternally
inQtlflltirkn« In hie mirl_ tic miirlinrr rtnrc ”
institutions in his address at mid
winter commencement exercises
here.
Dr. Carroll said educators today,
to a degree not observed within the
past fifty years, are trying again to
bring about a climate and at
mosphere of intimacy like the one
that has always abounded at Mere
dith.
“Thoughtful men are looking be
yond the nature of things,” he said,
“beyond the impersonalized science,
in search for greater happiness. We
have learned that Sir Francis Bacon
was only partially correct when he
emphasized science as the major
vehicle through which man might
live like a lung. We are looking
again at our small, liberal arts
schools which have always sought
first to provide man with a philoso
phy of life, for man needs a phi
losophy before he can live like a
king.”
Meredith graduates are in better
position than most, 'Dr. Carroll said,
to have reached a full conviction
as guiding stars.
Twenty-four young women re
ceived degrees in the January 28
exercises; two other degrees were
granted in absentia. Those gradu-
(Continued on page 4)
Focus on Literature
Provides REW Settings
February 12 marked the beginning of Religious Emphasis Week, sponsored by the Meredith
Christian Association. The theme for this week has been “For God’s Sake Be Human,” and chair-
man Kathy Booth said that tl.e week “attempts to focus on that goal of bringing sludeiUs to an
awareness of the excitnig possibility of being truly free.”
Many programs and activities revolved around this liiemc and purpose. Sunday iii-ht at
8:30 p.m. the Shaw University Players presented Sophocles’ Antigone in the auditorium. Although
the play is a classic, its moral truths still showed their significance to tiie audience.
Monday began with Morning Per
spective in first Brewer parlor, fol
lowed 'by a chapci address featur
ing Dr. John R. Killinger, Jr., main
speaker of the week, on “An End to
Loneliness.”
Monday afternoon an informal
tea was given for Dr. Killinger.
Vespers were held in the Hut fol
lowing supper, after which Dr. Kil
linger addressed an audience in
Jones Auditorium on “The Artist As
Prophet,” an interpretation of con-
ten:porary literature. The audience
then adjourned to the Hut for dis
cussion and a hootenany with “In
donesian flavor.”
Tuesday opened with Morning
Perspective and Killingcr’s chapel
address, “The Search For the Real.”
Tuesday afternoon Dr. Killinger led
a seminar on the “Death of God,”
and the evening was cappcd by a
showing of The Pawnbrokei- at the
Colony Theater, followed by a
thought-provoking panel discussion
led by Killinger, Dr. Henry Coffer,
(ConJinued on page 4)
the ai^vai^ Dr. Killinger at Meredith, he is greeted by Bonnie Poplio,
^ili^ne Katham, Kathy Booth, and Mr. Dud Walker, who discuss with him plans fo^
Reception, Tour, Exhibits to Be Held
College Initiates Parents' Day
For the first time in Meredith
history, parents will be given a
chance to see more of the campus
than stairs and halls crowded with
luggage. On February 26, with regis
tration beginning at 2:00 p.m., par
ents are invited to attend an open
house at the college.
The afternoon will feature stu
dent-guided tours of the campus, in
cluding points of interest such as
the library and classroom buildings,
which are not usually open on Sun
days. Several different types of ex-
tion will climax the afternoon at
4:00. One of the main purposes of
the reception is to allow parents to
meet faculty members.
Parents’ Day developed from the
(Continued on page 2)
SPECIAL EVENTS
Sunday, February 26
PARENTS’ DAY
2:00—Registraticm
4:00-—Keccptiou
Monday, February 2?
FOUNDERS’ DAY
10:00—Service In Jones Audi
torium
11:00—Coffee Hour, Home Eco-
noniic's Departineni
Founders' Day Will Celebrate
Anniversary of College Charter
In a Founders’ Day ceremony on
hibits will be on display. A recep- February 27, Meredith College will
Annual Rush Week Held;
Phis Capture Victory
cclebrate the seventy-sixth anniver
sary of the signing of the college
charter. Dr. L. M. Massey, chair
man of the Board of Trustees, will
be the guest speaker at a 10:00
scrvice in Jones Auditorium.
(Continued on page 2)
I
It's Happening!
On Thursday night of Religious
Emphasis Week, it’s happening —
ihe happening. According to Cheryl
Oliver and Connie Flynt who
planned it, the happening is an ex
perience to which those who are
present will react, perhaps in spite
of themselves.
Those daring souls who signed
up to take part in “The Game”
were informed of the time and place
they arc to appear. They will do
different things in various places;
they will see unusual things, or per
haps common things shown in an
unusual perspective.
The happening may be analogous
to the game of life; and then again,
it may not. What a happening
means depends upon the nature of
those who experience it. One thing
is certain: it’s happening tonight.
Rush Week annually highlights
the year’s activities of the Philare-
tiati and Astrotekton societies. The
societies compcte to convince new
students to become an Astro or Phi.
Supper clubs were part of the
entertainment of both societies. The
. Phi supper club on Tuesday was in
\ the atmosphere of a coffeehouse,
; while the Astros’ dinner Wcdnes-
 day night was held high on the
' mountain of the gods.
■ Each society entertained fresh
man and transfer students on the
day designated for its rush activities.
The Phis feted new day students on
Tuesday afternoon and held their
annual luau on Thursday night.
Astro Day was Wednesday, and
events included a tea for day stu
dents in the afternoon. A party for
all new students was held Tliursday
evening.
Decision Day on Friday con
cluded Rush Week activities, as the
Astros congratulated the victorious
Speaker and Events of REW
Provoke Thought, Discussion
Phi sponsor and president, Mr. James Eads and Launi Page, and Astro spoasor and
president, Mrs. Frank Grubbs and Martha Ann Butler, pose with society mascots
By F.LIZABETH MAYNARD
Dr. John Killinger’s lectures and
the events related to the Religious
Emphasis Week theme, “For God’s
Sake Be Human,” have provoked
discussion, thought, and intro.spec-
tion for many Meredith students,
The following opinions were voiced
after two days of the program.
When asked what a week of this
type means, and what does it ac
complish, students replied in a
variety of ways:
Martha Thompson: It is an op
portunity for the community to
think together. Setting aside such a
week makes us take more serious
interest in the whole program.
Sarah Copeland: REW brings
about the revelation that you can
■be both Christian and normal at
the same time.
Ellen Kirby: REW is the most in
tellectually stimulating week of the
yean As a result, it arouses new
possibilities for dialogue between
students and faculty.
Judy Kornei;ay: Killinger has
given me more insight into myself
and my relationship to others than
anything or anyone before. 77i/a-
REW is fulfilling its purpose on our
campus.
Mary Ann McCurdy: REW has
meant much to me simply because
Dr. Killinger is HUMAN!
Barbara Jean Carver: Dr. Kil
linger has brought much life to this
year’s programs.
Brenda Smith: REW is a revival!
Ginger Hughey: It is enriching to
have men on campus who aren’t
the typical Sunday preachers. It’s a
special time — not just a usual
Monday, Wednesday, Friday chapel
(Continued on page 2)
    

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