North Carolina Newspapers

    THE TWIG
Nmmpuper of thm Studmnta of meredUh College
VOL. LX. NO. 16
MEREDITH COI.LEGE, RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA
FEBRUARY 22. 1982
Dr. Leon Martel to speak Founder’s Day
Dr. Leon C. Martei will be
the speaker for Founder’s Day
to be held February 26.
Dr. Martel is a political
scientist and a futurist,
specializing in the forecasting
of economic, political, social
and resource issues. He is the
author of Lend-Lease, Loans
and the Coming of the Cold
War, and co-author (with
Herman Kahn and William
Brown) of The Next 200 Years.
His current book, in process,
is Preparing for the Future, a
guide to the opportunities to
be found and the dangers to be
avoided in the decades
immediately ahead. Dr.
Martel is also a captain in the
United States Naval Reserve
with extensive professional
experience in the fields of
political and military
intelligence.
Dr. Martel is a former
member of the professional
staff of Hudson Institute, the
prestigious East Coast "think
tank." and served as its
Executive Vice President
from 1977 through 1980. While
at Hudson he was project
leader for studies for the
Executive Office of the
President of the United States
and the offices of the Vice
President and the Secretary of
Defense. He also coordinated
Madren, Bailey win
Mathematics competition
The dawn of January 23
found a veil of cold and ice
spread across the Raleigh
area. While most of Meredith
slept, a contingent of 16
valiant souls crept from
beneath their blankets,
slipped and slid the
treacherous route to Joyner
Hall, and there tested their
analytical skills and acumen
against the treacherous shoals
of the first annual freshman-
sophomore mathematics
competition.
Three hours later, all
emerged victorious. Problems
that had appeared insolvable
yielded after minutes of
careful probing. One more
time the human intellect had
triumphed. Days later, the
graders of the contest
announced that sophomore
Beth Madren and freshman
Cheryl Bailey had captured
high honors by taking first and
second places respecitvely.
Sophomore Kim Causey and
freshman Lori Lewis were
awarded honorable mention
awards for their efforts.
Contest winner Beth
Madren intends to complete a
double major in mathematics
and music. Runner-up Cheryl
Bailey hopes to eventually
gain certification as a
physical therapist. Kim
Causey is well on her way
toward a B.S. in
mathematics and intends to
learn enough accounting
along the way to pass the
C.P.A. exams. Lori Lewis is
still not certain of which
academic direction she will
pursue.
For both the winners and
the other I2 competitors, the
contest provided an
opportunity to improve their
problem solving skills outside
the restrictions of the
classroom.
Contest organizers.
Professors Kraines and
Taylor, pronounced the event
an unqualified success.
the work of the Institute's
“Prospects for Mankind”
study and contributed
regularly to its Corporate
Environment Program.
Prior to coming to
Hudson, Dr. Martel was a
tenured member of the faculty
of Hofstra University where
he taught courses and
seminars in international
relations, Soviet politics, and
American foreign and defense
policies. Earlier, while on
active military duty, he was in
charge of the Russian and
East European desk in the
Navy's European Intelligence
Center and later served as an
intelligence i^earch analyst
in the National Security
Agency. In 1973, upon the
MARCH CONVOCATION:
release of the P.O.W.s from
North Vietnam, Dr. Martel
was temporarily recalled to
active duty to serve as
operations coordinator, for
their intelligence debriefing at
St. Albans Navy Hospital.
Dr. Martel holds a B.A.
from Dartmouth College, and
an M.A., Ph.D., and
Certificate from the Russian
Institute from Columbia
University. He has written
numerous articles for
scholarly journals and
popular periodicals and is a
frequent guest speaker for
business, professional, and
college audiences.
The topic of Dr. Martel’s
speech for Founder's Day is
“Today’s Woman
Tomorrow's World”.
Mullins to speak
on nuclear power
by Lisa Sorrels
How much do you know
about nuclear power and
nuclear energy? At the March
Convocation on March l, at 10
a.m. in Jones Auditorium, the.
A Review of Black Emphasis Week
by Chrissy Murphrey
From February 8-12,
Black Emphasis Week was
held at Meredith College.
Centering around the theme of
“Positive Images for us,” the
week was begun with a
convocation by Waltye
Rasulala. the Public Affairs
Manager and hostess of the
WRAL television program
“Aware.” The Dance Troupe
from Saint Augustine's
College added to the week
with an inspiring performance
in Carswell Concert Hall.
Later In the week, there was a
special worship service with a
sermon on "Who am I”
delivered by the Rev. Cynthia
Hale, the chaplain at the
Federal Correctional Center.
On Friday, Black Emphasis
Week was brought to a close
by Black poetry readings in
the Alumnae House by
students, faculty, and staff.
The co-chairpersons of
Black Emphasis Week were
Black Voices In Unity
members Jennifer McNair
and Cynthia Washington.
Cynthia Washington had the
following to comment on
Black Emphasis Week:
"Black Emphasis Week is
a nourishing time lor me. It Is
a lime tor me to meditate on
my heritage, it is a time to
give thanks to those brave
black men and women who
have paved a clearer path for
me to follow, and it is a time
for me to re-evaluate the
direction in which my own life
is headed in regards to my
i‘on(ributions (o the Black
race.
1 feel especially
priviledged to have been co
chairperson of Black
Emphasis Week; planning
and hostessing the programs
not only allowed me the
opportunity to challenge my
own limits but to learn the
value of team work and
cooperation as well.
Organizing the programs was
hasseting at times but it was
all worth It. Participation was
good; I’ve beard a lot of
positive feedback, and I
thoroughly enjoyed it."
Sophomore class
Christmas food
and clothing drive
by Sheri Wayne
The Sophomore class held
a Christmas food and clothing
drive for an area family that
the class adopted during the
1980-1981 school year. To
encourage participation, the
See March 1st issue of
Twig
for Information on
Election Candidates.
Sophomore halls competed
against each other to see
which one could collect the
most goods. A point system
was devised for the scoring of
this competition. Each article
of clothing was worth two
points; cans and accessories
were worth one point a piece.
Third Brewer won the
competition with a total of
1,120 points. Coming in close
second was Second Vann with
823 points. The goods were
presented to the family before
the Christmas holidays.
The Sophomore class
would like to thank Aimee
Eddy and Amy Avery for their
hard work in organizing this
successful project. The family
still needs wood. Anyone
wishing to donate money or
wood should contact Elaine
Jolly or Sheri Wayne.
Meredith Community has the
opportunity to learn about the
uses of nuclear power. Jay T.
Mullins, the director of the
Shearon Harris Visitors'
Center of the Carolina Power
and Light Company, will
discuss nuclear energy and
then entertain questions from
the audience.
Mullins received his
Bachelor of Science degree
from the University of North
Carolina and majored in
Business Administration. Last
year he was President of the
Cary Toastmasters Club and
was also Toastmaster of the
Vear. As director of the
Shearon Harris Visitors’
Center, he supervises a staff
of four which serves as a
speakers’ bureau within North
Carolina. They hosted 25,000
visitors at the Center in 1981
and spoke with 600 groups
either at the Center or at other
locations in the state.
The Shearon Harris
Nuclear Plant has been under
construction in southern Wake
County for the last four years
and is the largest construction
project in the state. The first
unit is scheduled to be on-line
in 1985 and capable of
providing electricity for a
community of 400,000 people.
Wake County’s population is
approximately 300,000. The
second unit should be on-line
in 1989.
Mullins will address the
positive and negative effects
of nuclear energy in his
presentation. A question and
answer session will follow.
Now is the time to decide how
you feel about nuclear power:
Nukes or No Nukes.
    

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