North Carolina Newspapers

    NEWSPAPER OF THE STUDENTS OF MEREDITH COLLEGE
VOLUME LXJI NUMBER 13
MEREDITH COLLEGE
New computer opportunities
open to Meredith students
FEBRUARY 13. 19B4
New programs and equip
ment are bringing nxre oppor
tunities to Meredith students.
In the Fall of 1963, Meredith
College began a new interdis
ciplinary major in mathematlcs-
computer science. The program
wlii broaden Inteliectuai
development and career pre-
potion by developing the stu
dents' quantitative and problem
solving skills. Artd opportun
ities ^>ound. A numt»r of in
ternships at the Research
Triangle are available, and
access to the North Carolina
State University computer
science cirriculum wilt provide
further experience.
New equipment on campus
provides students with the
“har>ds-on" experience neces
sary for developrnent of «>m-
puter skills. In August of 1983,
the Data General Corporation
donated an Eclipse Line conv
puter which will eventually sup
port twenty terminals for
academic use, along with
tw^ty microcomputers in var
ious campuS'loQaUons.
Follo^t^ is a list of,the
compute’ sCi^c^' xun5culum
and requiren[ient8 for a major:
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CURRICULUM
CSC 100 INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTING
A study of the capabilities
and limitations of the computer
including its impact on society.
A simple theoretical computer
gives the student insight into
computer design. Flow charting
is used to study the design of
algorithms. Several simple
computer programs are written
from the flow charts and njn on
the computer. CREDIT, TWO
HOURS.
CSC 101 INTRODUCTION TO A
LANGUAGE
A study of a specific com
puter language. Prerequisite:
CSC 100. CREDIT, ONE HOUR.
CSC 201 COMPUTER
PROGRAMMING
An introductory course in
problem solving on the conrt-
puter. The student will learn
program design and program
implementation in a structured
programming language. Prere
quisite: MAT 211. CREDIT,
THREE HOURS.
CSC211 COBOL
PROGRAMMING
introduction to progrgnv
ming in the Cobol language.
Prerequisite: Three hours of
computer science. CREDIT,
THREE HOURS.
CSC ' - 2t2 - ADVANCED
PROGRAMMING
An intermediate level pro
gramming course with goals of
continuing development of dis
cipline in program design and in
debugging and testing larger
programs. Prerequisite: Either
CSC 201 or 211, depending,on
the language used. CREDIT,
•THREE HOURS.
CSC 222 INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
Bell calls computer use ‘fad’
WASHINGTON, D.C.
(CPS) - Many of the computer
programs used in the nation’s
schools amout to nothing more
than expensive, “electronic
page-turning” devices, accord
ing to U.S. Education Depart
ment Secretary Terrel Bell.
In an informal office
meeting with wire service
reporters, Bell also revealed
plans to finance research to find
more constructive ways of
using computers to help stu
dents learn math and writing
skills.
The current use of com
puters in schools and colleges
is “almost a fad,” Bell says, and
the available education pro-
Steve’s offers delicious fare
By Anne Whlts-
If you've ev^ tasted hon«-
made hand-cranked ice cream,
you know that any other kind
just doesn't measure up. But
there's a new place in Raleigh
that serves a mighty close
second. It's Steve's, located at
2010 Hillslsorough Street, and
judging from the long lines at
the counter. It may soon make
hand-cranking obsolete.
Steve's actually makes
fresh ice cream daily, right
there on the premises, in 20-
quart, motorized versions of the
old-fashioned hank-cranked
mixers. Of the 50 flavors Steve's
makes, there are 12 available bn
any one day. New flavors are
often created, such as Straw
berry Shortcake and Banana
Cream Pie.
Steve's trademark is Mix-
ins-that is, ingredients ranging
from Reeses’ Pieces and
crushed oreos to coconut and
granola - which are expertly
mixed into any flavor a custo
mer chooses, creating custom
ized Ice cream. The Mix-lns are
displayed at the counter, much
like a salad bar (well, with may-
bea few extracedories), and the
customer can choose scoops or
sundaes of any combination up
to three ingredients. Of course.
Provides the basic
concepts of computer systems,
inti^ucfes computer architec
ture and teaches an assembly
language. Prerequisite: CSC
201. CREDIT, THREE HOURS.
CSC 301 INTRODUCTION TO
DATA STRUCTURES
Discusses a number of the
fundaniental data ^ructures
such as linear lists, stacks,
linked lists, and trees as well as
common algorithms used in
acting on these data structures.
Prerequisite: CSC 222.
CREDIT. THREE HOURS.
CSC 321 TOPICS IN COM-
PUnNG SCIENCE
A Junior-senior level topic
in computer science. Prere
quisite; CSC 222. CREDIT,
THREE HOURS.
REQUIREMENl^ FOR
MATHEMATICS CCWPUTER
SaENCE MAJOR
The annual Owiging
1. Core Curriculum (all majors
in mathematical sciences).
a.MAT211,212,220,250,313 ^ ,
-•b. »^h^6«e-eear9e-eho^~-
graduates found some bnght
spots for Job seekers amid what
Students take advantage of the conviuters set up In Harris Hall.
Jobs for college grads
listed in new publication
from, MAT 321, 415, 425 or 434.
2. MAT 360
3. At least 26 hours in
mathenrtatics courses numbered
200 or above.
4. At least 15 hours in computer
science courses numbered 200
or above including CSC 201,
221, 301, and 321.,
5. A total of 44 hours in
mathematics and computer
science courees numbered 200
or above.
grams “leave a great deal to be
desired” in terms of “interacting
with the mind of the student.”
The Education Dept, plans
to target research funding to
develop programs for pre-alge-
bra and algetira courses, In
which many average students
"bomb out ... never to come
back again.”
the less adventurous can
always order a straight scoop.
Steve's also offers floats,
sodas, milkshakes, and ice
cream pies.
St^'s is a casual, low-key
place geared to college stu
dents. There's an upright piano
at orre wall, which customers
are invited to play. There's a
blackboard with a daily trivia
question; answer it con^tly
and you win a free Mix-in. And
there are framed awards on the
walls from Boston Magazine in
recognition of “the best, ice
cream In town,”
Is Steve's the best ice
(Continued on page 4)
is generally characterized as a
flat recruiting year, The survey,
which is unique in that it seels
responses ony from employers
intending to hire graduates this
spring, uncovered more than
100 companies and govemment
agencies with definite job
openings.
The employers with finn
plans to hire graduating seniors
this year are listed in a special
supplement. “101 Companies
with Jobs for New College
Grads,” in the February 1984
issue scheduled to be on news
stands January 31. Changing
Tinfies is published by Kiplinger
Washington Editors, Inc.
While many firms said their
campus recruiting has been
curtailed as a continuing result
of the recession, many others
offei^ encouragement,
especially to students with
specialized skills. About 40 per
cent of the companies surveyed
reported that they are having
difficulty finding qualified can
didates for certain kinds of
jot>s. Those Job openings are
rriostiy in technical fields, such
as engineering, physics, dairy
science and manuf»turing. But
some organization report st>ort
ages of applicants for such
diverse jobs as economists,
linguists, restaurant managers,
intelligence officers, physicans
and nurses./4 listing of these
companies is part of the issue.
Overall,' about 40 percent of
the companies responding said
they plan to hire the same num
ber of grads as they did last
year, and 30 percent say they
plan to hire more this year, Only
16 percent report they will hire
fewer.
' .Th? fepecfai ' section pro
vides a brierf description of each
organization's principal pro
ducts and services, along with
an address where applicants
should send their resumes. In
addition, each listing specifies
the type of academic back
ground wanted, and the actual
job categories to be filled. Many
employers have listed candi
dates in short supply so that
individuals with those skills will
have an added Incentive to
apply.
Besides the list, this year's
job section provides an over
view of the current job market,
and includes specific sugges
tions about writing a successful
job seeking letter, preparing for
an inten/iew and adjusting to
the demands of a first job.
The graduates ' most in
demand are those with engin
eering degrees; 65 percent of
the companies in the listing re
port they need graduates in
various engineering specialties,
from electrical to aerospace and
po\wr specialties.
Behind engineers on the
demand index are computer
science graduates, wanted by
51 percent of the listed com
panies; accounting grads,
sought by 48 percent, and busi-
ness-mai1eting-economics
grads, wanted by 43 percent of
the companies.
Further down the scale are
graduates in mathematics
(wanted by 22 percent of listed
companies), physical sciences
(21 percent) and liberal ^s (17
percent). And 27 percent of the
companies reported a need for
graduates with specialties In
(Continued on Page 2)
    

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