North Carolina Newspapers

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CAMPUS NEWS
Meredith gets “A Taste of Research”
TIFFANY ADAMS
Editor in Chief
The Undergraduate
Research Program culmi
nated its summer 2003 pro
gram Thursday night by
showcasing the work pro
duced over the summer.
Meredith's
Undergraduate Research
Program provides opportu
nities for students to collab
orate with a faculty mem
ber in a particular field of
study. This past summer,
Meredith professors teamed
up with students who have
similar research interests.
"A Taste of Research,"
which was held Thursday,
Oct. 2 showcased their
achievements thus far.
This event, coordinated
by the Undergraduate
Research Program, was
designed to be an informal
and informative
way for the
Meredith com
munity to leam
about the
research that
students and
faculty are con
ducting.
The event
showcased 25
research proj
ects that were
funded through
summer
research stipend
awards. These
projects represented
Meredith's educational
diversity, and research from
several departments includ
ing Art, Biology and
Health Sciences, Business,
Health, Physical Education
^d Dance, History and
Politics, Human
Research teams standing along the
balcony during the introduction
Photo courtesy of Meredith College website
Environmental Sciences,
Math and Computer
Science, and Psychology
was showcased.
Although 12 of the 25
projects displayed on
Thursday were from the
Biology and Health Science
areas, the Undergraduate
Research Program desires
to provide
opportunities
for all students,
not just those
interested in
jnaturai sci
ences.
The event
began at 7:00
p.m. with an
introduction by
Dr. Rosalind
Reichard, vice
president for
academic
affairs. During
her introduc
tion, Reichard praised stu
dents and faculty for their
hard work.
Following the introduc
tion, researchers answered
questions and discussed
their findings with others
attending the event.
Displays were set up
throughout the Science and
Mathematics Building.
Snacks and drinks were
also provided at the event.
The Undergraduate
Research Program will host
various events during the
fall and spring semesters
that will showcase research
projects in the humanities,
the natural and social sci
ences, the performing arts,
the fine arts, mathematics
and others areas of study.
Students will be able to
present their work through
presentations, performances
and posters.
Those interested in the
Undergraduate Research
Program can fmd informa
tion abodt grant application
deadlines and events at
www.meredith.edu/urp.
Leadership Enrichment series begins
AMY KAY
NICKERSON
Staff Writer
During each fall semes
ter, the office of Student
Activities and Leadership
Development sponsors a
Leadership Eruichment
Series that focuses on
issues relevant to today's
developing leaders. This
year's series includes facul
ty, staff and student presen
ters from Meredith and
Peace Colleges.
On Wednesday, October
1, the first session of the
series, entitled "Juggling
Responsibilities: Keeping
Balance in Your Life," was
conducted by Meredith's
Director of Academic
Advising, Amy Hitlin.
A session compiled from
tips from Stephen Covey’s
Seven Habits for Highly
Effective People and an
adapted version of a Time
Management Presentation
by David Chase (Academic
Advising and Career
Development, James
Madison University) dealt
with issues relating to pri
orities, stress and time
management.
Hitlin first asked stu
dents to volunteer their pri
orities to illustrate what is
important to students.
Sleep topped the list, fol
lowed by social life and
schoolwork. Hitlin went on
to identify ways to accom
plish each priority without
sacrificing other goals.
She then focused on
Covey's Seven Habits for
Highly Effective People,
which covers a wide range
of time-management princi
ples. From goals to self
renewal, Hitlin explained
each habit with applicable
examples.
The next topic Hitlin
discussed was a Quadrant
system, also from Stephen
Covey. Based on properties
of urgency and importance,
Hitlin discussed that if stu
dents spend their life doing
only things of both urgency
and importance. Quadrant
I, their lives will be in con
stant crisis, which leads to
stress and burn-out.
Quadrant 111, referred to as
the "quadrant of deception"
deals with urgent items that
lack importance. Results of
living in Quadrant III are a
short-term focus and shal
low or broken relation
ships. Quadrant IV consists
of things that are neither
important nor ui^ent.
People that spend a majori
ty of their time in this
quadrant are thought to be
irresponsible and dependent
on others or institutions for
basics. Quadrant II, on the
other hand, consists of
quality and leadership.
Goal setting, vision, per
spective and balance all
characterize this quadrant
of items of importance but
lacking urgency.
"The session helped me
to understand the difference
between things that are
really important and things
that are not as important,"
said Michelle Scott, sopho
more.
After the quadrant illus
tration, Hitlin used an anal
ogy of trying to fit big
rocks and pebbles into a
jar. She explained that to
place the big rocks fu-st and
then let the pebbles fill in
the rest, was an example of
prioritizing.
Hitlin's next topic was a
discussion of time wasters
such as indecision, procras
tination, micro-manage-
ment, and poor planning.
As a way to combat time
wasters, Hitlin presented a
list of questions to ask
when faced with a time-ris-
ing management decision.
Finally, Hitlin related
time-management to lead
ership, specifically student
leaders. She explained that
leaders must effectively use
resources, including time,
and act M an example to
others. She concluded that
leaders never grow to a
point where they no longer
need to prioritize.
"It was good to get a
reminder of how to manage
time effectively," Scott
said. "No matter how well
you manage your time, you
always need a refresher
course."
Three sessions, one each
Wednesday in October,
remain in the series.
Tonight's topic "Living
with a B.O. Problem: Your
Birth Order and How it
Affects Personality" will be
presented by Shelly Myers,
Director of Residence Life
at Peace College.
"Participants will
explore their own birth
order and how personality
impacts leadership style,"
Assistant Director of
Student Activities and
Leadership Development,
Kelly Scott said. "Students
will defmitely not want to
miss this session. I encour
age students to attend and
bring a friend."
Continued on Page 3
    

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