North Carolina Newspapers

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registrant who does so is taking a
flight chance that the system might sud—
denly decide that it needs many more men
rhan it is presently planning to take, and
should think carefully about this possi
bility, however slight. It does appear,
from all indications presently available,
that the ceiling of 195 will be valid.
This rule of course only effects men
who turned nineteen or older during cal
endar year 1969. Those turning nineteen
this year were not in the first priori y
pool and therefore will be placed in it
on 1 January 1971. Therefore, this escape
route is dangerously uncertain for men not
yet in this year's pool who are under
twenty years of age. Next year s lottery
ceiling number could be any number at all,
and no'one can make any predictions about
it.
% At
KENT LEGAL DEFENSE RAISES THOUSANDS
KENT, OHIO—(CPS)—A total of $3, 000
has been collected so far for the legal
defense of the twenty-five students and
faculty members indicted by a special Ohio
grand jury, according to the Kent STATER,
I its ranks from that time, until today it
iis realistically able to challenge the
strong political organization that sup
ports George Wallace.
Dr. Cashin is a dentist with a respect
ed practice extending throughout the
state. He has continually sacrificed that
practice, however, in order to coordinate
his political and civil rights activities.
A positive addition to the large num
ber of candidates under the NDPA banner
is the far-reaching nature of their plat
form. Several of the provisions include;
—Restructuring the tax system to re
move the heavy burden from workers and the
poor and insuring that the wealthy pay
their share of taxes;
—Guaranteeing the rights of collective
bargaining for all workers;
—Abolishing the Wallace-Carter Act and
all other special privileges which the
state grants to big business,
NDPA candidates state that their plat
form represents an attempt to create an
alternative political structure for the
State of Alabama, with the expressed goal
of wresting control of the state from the
the student newspaper, $1,000 has already j"hands of cynical, exploitive men like
been spent on bail money.
William Kunstler, the lavjyer who de
fended the Chicago Eight, has offered to
defend the Kent State Twenty-Five, Coun
sel has not announced whether the students|
indicted will seek a special federal grandj
jury investigation. Nine of the twenty-
five still remain to be arrested.
The money, collected during the first
week following the indictments, was fun-
neled through two organizations that were
immediately set up. They have since merged
this would-be 'George the First' and re-
Iturning it to the men and women of every
Ipolitical, racial, and economic background
iwho believe in Alabama and make her great."
J.W. MONDESIRE
At Af Af
THE PLACE TO GO
In these days of dirty air and clut
tered streams can you call to mind a coun
try which does not yet have a serious
problem v/ith pollution, or overcrowding,
'or racial conflict, or vanishing wildlife.
into one fund (The^Kent lognl Dofenee Fundjor dlmlnlehlng natural rejurces? Neu
P. 0. Box Ho, Kent.^Ohlo, 4l2iC) . Izealand ia such a place and It Is alac a
country where there is no lirai.t on game,
more fish than a fisherman can. handle and
I,
FIRST STATEWIDE BLACK PARTY TN ALABAMA
(CPS)—The fall election in ATHbama
will intrcdvioe a new but flaijla- organized !mG"ths
and indoper.dent political paity iujo the
electoral arena. The Natic.r-a.l Dcm-icratic
Party of A.la.rnma (l-TDPA) , the r.-ro': Black
statewide joli.tical party in is
waging 3. poTical campaign cf over 'ji'O
candidate.';, spanni.ng the range from court
surrogate tc governor.
The NDPA slate is headed by Dr. John
L. Cashin, gubernatorial candidate, and
Issaih Hayes, candidate for lieutenant
governor. The NDPA was officially inaugu
rated in 1968 when it challenged the es—
tablished machine at the Chicago conven
tion, It has been continually expanding
iwhorc there is open sea.ccn for twelve
on deer. Moreove-^r, because of the
corJ'.i.guration of the t\:o main Inlands,
jmcunvaln climbing and surl'iug are equally
to t!ie inhabitants.
i Doer cone in eight varieties in New
[Zealand and can be shot any time of the
‘year because they are considered noxious
janimals. Fishing for brown trout, rainbow
jtrout, and landlocked salmon is usually
very rewarding. The catch limit is twenty
.with a size limit of fourteen inches. In
[certain protected streams, people feed
rainbow trout by hand, and these favored
fish grow as large as twenty-five pounds.
Campers and hikers who move freely
    

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