North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two
THE NEW BERN MIRROR, NEW BERN, N. C.
Friday, August 31. 1973
In this year when inflation is
running wild, the problems of
buying a home, owning an
automobile, and eating meat
every week are increasingly the
concerns of millions of
Americans.
Across the nation, parents
will soon Hnd that inflation has
affected not only the school
lunch program and the cost of
meals that their children will
eat in cafeterias, but clothing
and supplies necessary to equip
their children for the
educational process.
iujAMPjPsb'ii I
R9A&3aBS J
Complete Reol Estate ^rvice
M44M* t(.Kt •WUNNa
DIAL M7-4U1
The TRADEMARK -
a little thing to
look for, but a big
thing to find.
YOUIL PIND IT ON
MIN'S CLOTHING
ATi
Bryant-Mcleod LTD
321-Pollock St.
Scott
TILE
CO.
TILE AND
CARPETING
L.C. SCOTT, JR.
637-3923
Auto Radiators
Cleaned, Redded and
Repaired
We remove and replace
B & R Radiator
Shop
BRIDGETON
ME 7-4504
Butteric & Simplicity
Patterns and all
types of notions and
Dress & Suit
Material.
THRIFTY
FABRIC SHOP
Kinston Highway
Dial 637-6565
i
With real estate and home
values climbing monthly and
mortgage interest rates
reaching the highest level in our
country’s history—per
cent—and the prospect of even
higher costs, many Americans
are losing hope of owning their
own homes and many other
material comforts.
Shortages of food and fuel
show no sign of easing soon.
Indeed, experts warn that
these shortages are only a taste
of what is yet to come. With
commodity, troubles growing
round the world, many predict
that the industrial nations are
bumping against the limits of
resources we have long taken
for granted. Newsprint, baling
wire, tallow, sawdust, and a
multitude of foods are in short
supply. Wheat recently sold on
mercantUe exchanges at more
than $5 per bushel. Other food
grains have reached ail time
highs. While the Administration
should not be blamed for un
controllable agricultural
conditions, it is now generally
recognized that the sale of U. S.
grain to the Soviets last year
contributed greatly to our
present food problems.
Having set in motion a
multitude of complex policies in
1972 which have affected our
economy, the Administration
has yet to devise any policy to
extricate us from i^ation or
the shortages which confront us
at every turn. One thing for
cerUdn is that “cost of living
controls” have not worked very
well in a trillion dollar
economy. Even so, since the Ad
ministration chose to travel that
road it will not be easy to get rid
of wage-price regulations. THE
DRAFT—In contrast to the
Administration and many in
dividuals who advocated an ail-
volunteer army, I was one of
those who said that the ending
of the draft would endanger our
national security. On August 28,
1970, I issued a statement
warning that there was serious
doubt that we could maintain
our military manpower
requirements under such a
system. I pointed out that the
most noticeable result would be
that it would add immensely to
the cost of our defense at a time
when the Federal budget is
already incurring a deficit of
many billions of dollars. My
doubts have now been con
firmed.
The all-volunteer system has
now been in effect since
February and the figures now in
are far from assuring that we
will have an adequate source of
enlistments. In spite of billions
of dollars of pay increases, the
Air Force, Navy and Marines
have barely met their quotas in
recent months, and the Army,
which relied on the draft for
manpower for many years, has
consistently fallen below its
recruiting goal for the past six
months. Enlistments in the
Guard and Reserves are also at
YOU'LL PROBABLY FIND IT AT
Ashew*Sf Inc.
HARDWARE
AND
BUILDING SUPPLIES
1I0I-3-S ftolleck StfMl
Hi«hway 17 Seulli
NIW BERN
low levels.
As an editorial writer for the
Minneapolis Tribune stated the
problem succinctly: “The all-
volunteer armed force seems to
us an idea whose time should
not have come.”
Shortages of capable recruits
comes at a critical time when it
is evident that we will need a
strong national defense in the
years ahead. According to
Jane’s Fighting Ships, the
authoritative British
publication on naval power, the
Soviet Union has now taken
over the lead in overall naval
strength and is challenging the
U. S. Navy in the
Mediterranean and elsewhere.
The hard fact is that we need
adequate military and par
ticularly naval strength to in
sure that our vital sea lanes are
open to transport petroleum and
other essential raw materials to
keep our economy intact.
Tliis is a matter that will
require increasing attention in
the years ahead.
It Pays to Advertise
Dodge Mart *>c.
Hwy. 70 East at
Dodge
Airport Road
Hoflie of Dependable
Used Cars
TRU-TREAD
TIRE CO.
Recapping B Vulcanizing
223 Craven St. - ME 7-2417
BALANCING & VULCANIZING — TIRE TRUING
FOR CARS, TRUCKS & TRACTORS. TRAINED
TECHNICIANS. GUARANTEED WORK.
HIGHWAY 70 - JUST WEST OF NEW BERN
DIAL 637-6830
    

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