North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
THE HILLTOP,
Entered at the Postoffice, Mars Hill, N. C., as Second Class Matter,
February 20, 1926.
Member North Carolina Collegiate Press Association.
STAFF
J. A. McLEOD
” W. C. CAPEL
Mahagfing Editor JAMES BALEY, JR.
Faculty Director
Editor
MANAGERIAL
Business Manager DE FORREST HASTY
Circulation Manager ELLEN ROYAL JONES
Typjgt SEDAHLIAH PROPSTS
Advertising Manager
A. B. PARKER
DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS
FRANCES RICH
RAY BOWMAN
FRANK HUSKINS
BARTLETT HAGER
D. L. STEWART
Exchange - SARAH BLACKWELL
Religious
Athletics-
Society—
Alumni
Poetry
Reporters MADELINE MAY, JAMES CHERRY, WILLIAM
CAPEL, PEARLE JUSTICE, THERON KING
The Question of Policy
A campus newspaper is always confronted with the question of the pol
icy that is best adapted to the campus on which it is located. The Hilltop,
the official organ of Mars Hill College, holds a unique place in the minds
of all those on the campus. It is a carefully read sheet and of a necessity
must be careful in its editorials so as not to offend any particular person
unrightfully. Be that as it may, the policy of The Hilltop, as long as the
present staff holds to the office, will be a policy of a reflector of campus
policies and campus opinions. We make concessions to no organization on
the campus and try to show no favoritism to any particular group.
Anything.that is n4ws, regardless of persons connected, and providing
it be' of printable character, we will print. Any criticism that is offered by
students shall be printed as long as no personal remarks are carried.
The paper aims to be a carrier of news, ideas and thoughts, and is not
a space in which personal mud-slingpng can be conducted, therefore any
thing in the nature of intensely personal criticism is never printed.
The Hilltop stands fairly behind any forward looking movement on the
campus and clearly aligns itself with the progressive element that is ever
loeking toward a greater Mars Hill.
’ In conclusion let us state that we are at any time willing to accept
criticisms from any persons regarding The Hilltop and are ready at any time
to' accept the responsibility for anything that appears within its pages. W.C.
- 0 0 0
Paragraphics
Such epithets as “Well, aren’t we getting good?” “Curses; missed by
inches,” and “I made that round in par” are being exchanged among the so-
called golfers. “Golluf” is the latest sport which Mars Hill students have
taken up. It seems to have become very popular in the last week. Aside
from the fact that numbers of the little white pills are lost, no mishaps have
happened. The course could be much better, but then it could (?) be worse,
perhaps. Since “golluf’s” debut its followers have daily increased. Expec
tations of a “golluf toonament” are darkly rumored. Then the formation of
a “golluf” club should not be surprising. Well, whether it be on the green
or in the rough, “gollufers,” don’t take it so hard. Sadder things have hap
pened than to make a hole in ten. “Golluf” is hard on nerves as some of
the “gollufers,” will testify. And the campus has noticed the disgusted looks
and disgruntled remarks which accompany the presence of some of the fore
most of the “gollufers.”
Debaters may come and debaters may go, but Mars Hill has the best
ever. Two victories over strong teams representing Weaver College are the
latest additions to the ever-increasing laurels of the forensic teams. As yet
the girls have not performed, but Monday night they will have that oppor
tunity and against an opponent worthy of their mettle. Here’s hoping they
come, see, and fail to conquer.
Another sport which seems to be in favor is mumble-peg. Very inter
esting game to say the least to everyone and everything concerned except
the grass and the mugs of the “peg-rooters.” There are different types;
so you can pay your money and take your choice. Why not have a mumble-
peg “toonament” and crown the champion as king of his “world?”
MARSHILLCOLLEGE, MARSHILL, N. C.
Intercollegiate tennis teams are no longer a myth at M. H. C. A man
ager has been elected, and negotiations are being made to secure matches.
As yet the personnel of the teams has not been selected, but in the near
future, the manager announces, this will be done.
A Spanish Legend
(Translated by L. D. Ussery)
In the ancient city of Sergovia,
Spain, there is an old aqueduct about
which there is an old legend. The
legend is told to the children of Serg
ovia to this very day. It follows;
)Many years ago Satan fell in love
with a young woman of Sergovia.
She lived on a mountain nearby, and
every morning she went for water to
the spring in the valley.
A certain morning the evil one
came out and said to her very polite
ly: “You are very pretty, and if you
will marry me, I will do anything
whatsoever to please you.”
The young woman was frightened
and ran to the good father priest to
ask him for council. “A bad thing
is to displease the devil,” the old
man said thoughtfully; “so, ask him
to do something that is impossible,
and he will not annoy you any more.”
That night the village girl thought
a great deal. She was tired of going
for water to the spring in the valley.
Why not ask him to make an aque
duct that would carry the water from
the neighboring river to the mountain
and to the city, there on top of the
rock? That surely would be impos
sible !
When Lucifer again appeared, the
young woman said to him trembling,
“I desire that, in one night, you con
struct me a large aqueduct that will
cross the valley at the part below the
city and bring us fresh water from
the Frio river.”
That night there was heard all
over Sergovia the roaring of Satan
and the groaning of a thousand evil
spirits who were pulling enormous
stones of granite from the middle of
the earth to be used in the construc
tion of the colossal aqueduct.
At dawn the work was ended. Sat
isfied, Satan waited.
When the young lady saw the
strange aqueduct and Satan looking
at her smiling, she began to cross
herself, frightened and trembling.
Upon seeing the sign of the cross,
the evil one fled over mountains and
valleys in a rush.
And he probably is still running,
because he never again put his foot
in Spain.
AFTER I TOOK UP GOLF
(J. Frank Huskins)
When I was a child.
In the yard;
I played all the year
Look so hard.
I frolicked and smiled
and things didn’t near
I started to learn what I could discern
In the world.
To me all the books and cross teachers’ looks
Were unfurled.
Oh! then I coul grin and take it all in
Like a Prof;
But that, I vow, was before I learned how
To play golf.
Don’t anyone speak of the perfect technique
Of the game.
Perhaps you can lie and swear and—but I
Do the same!
Perhaps you can swing at the tiny white thing
E’er a score;
Perhaps you can pose on inverted left toes
And say “Fore.”
But I can do that, and I take off my hat
To the pair
Who can hole it in ten and call themselves men
Who don’t swear!
I’ve realized joys a-playing with the boys
On the hill.
But when I turn ’round and swing every pound
At the pill.
And it frolics off hitha’ like a crazy dog with a
Bloomin’ fit,
I think I could swear and pull out my hair
And just quit.
But I’m not the kind to turn loose my mind
Quite so vain;
So w'ith bosom still filled I return and upbuild
It again.
Now that is the way that collegians should play
The good golf.
Does efficiency count, in golfing or out?
Ask the Prof!
‘A Lost Poem’
One day while wandering ’mongst the rustling com,
Within my pondering mind a poem was born;
No pen and paper had I with me then.
That I might write, and pass it on to men.
My soul implored the phantom poem to stay.
But quickly as it came it fled away;
But, oh, how sweet it was, and strong and bright,
The whilst it stayed! Like some celestial light
That flashes once from off a distant shore,
A moment beams, then fades to shine no more.
And now through ail the days and years that floe
I strive to call the phantom back to me—
In vain, in vain!
The poem that came amongst the whispering corn
Will in my wondering, yearning soul be born
No more again!
-D. L. S.
Spring
From hill and grassy vale is heard
The chirp-chirp of the early bird;
The spring-clouds hov’ring o’er the earth
Attend refreshing April’s birth.
While showers descend and brooklets run—
A little breeze—and then the sun
Comes peeping from his hiding place
And warmly kisses earth’s cool face.
Then disappears behind the rain.
But presently bursts forth again
To spread his cheer and send his ray
Of HOPE upon the fragrant day.
O Spring—God sent thee from above
To ’waken and to call to love.
—Fred. C. Bose.
Believe It or Not
to Ripley
Floyd Williams
With Apologies
Pearle Justice and
are in love!
“Whit” Meares had a date on the
soupline!
“Prince” Wilkins runs a candy fac
tory!
Mr. Lee is a model husband even
tho’ Mr. McLeod won’t admit it!
We’re going to have a junior-
senior reception!
Kat Bennett’s latest term of en
dearment is “ole.”
We won all the debates!
There’s a golf course at Mars Hill!
Rom Sparks plays “Somebody’s
Stole My Gal.”
Lester Farrell is Bobby Jones’
understudy. He made 3 holes in 24—
on the Cascada Country Club course!
Helen Ramsey frames her “city
notes.”
Jim Cherry is sensible!
IN BEHALF OF THE GRASS
If the large number of the band.
Would move off and let me stand,
I’d do my bit to make gren
Every bare sfot that can be seen.
HERE AND T
By “Red" Kie:
Well, for the third tim
this column makes its
and for the third time the
not know what kind of lij
to the fond readers.
0
The baseball team is
real work down at the “I
dium and the gang vowi
Saturday with the boys fn
tile Institute will be ma
the games won column,
is doing some clever wq
boys in the outer gardens
ing real ball hawks.
0
The pitching staff is
every day. It seems now
Bruce, Albritton, and
the “foursome” that will
)r
3r
F
B
y
asl
Ml
tai
sel
le
burden of mound duty th
Jack Felmet has surpri
the fans that watch the
out with his ability to hur
hide. If Jack had been o
and had the experience
the other pitchers have,
say that he would be one
ulars for this season, and
j frame may yet find itsell
dy
suit.
0
The “Lions” have a to .
handle this year if they
top in a majority of the
following teams appear
dule: Textile Institute
burg. East Tennessee S
College of Johnson
Springs, Wofford College
burg, Rutherford College
Springs, and Lenoir Rli
are some open dates on t
and there is a possibili(
will be filled in soon.
O
lis
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for
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s.
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of ’
dl
, Kis
/ am a mere blade of grass,
I u-ave and nod to those tcho fass,
I stay there ’mongst the rest.
And do my duty as God thinks best.
It mars my beauty and makes me fine.
As on me those college boys recline,
Mumble-feg is now the go.
And rooting-the-feg does irritate me so!
—Frances P. Justice.
will-
poor
Was there ever a man who
ingly admitted having shown
judgment?
* * *
Whenever you tell someone to re
mind you of something you’re sure
to remember it yourself.
Sunday the soup line
by Graydon Jordan
Buckner. Now, perha]4y
had other plans in view,'
Club boys thought thi
ladies needed to be trei ^
result the boys went
frow did not go, but till nh
story and will be told i
s,
f.
ceive any predictions as
come of the two big le;
races for the coming
hoped that some of the A),
around here will hand in
tions as soon as possible.
0
This season will find '
son back in the big tent
as pilot in the minors. Jo
haps the most loved play
tional game and thousa
throughout the country i .
the best of luck as he m4.b.
step as a manager in
League. The Senators
out of 20 starts in the
among tho training camp
dope bucket remains
Washington club should
first division this year. J
over the job left vacant
Harris, who is the new
Detroit Tygers.
0
On Monday evening
week while a group
gentlemen were mead
way over to Melrose an
came upon a sight tha
eyes with tears. A bel
and white cat lay dead
The boys decided that
best for the cat, as we
boys that passed by, 1 jj
should have the benefit
It fell to the lot of
Morse to act as the
taker for the sad occasi|
Morse was arranging a 1
ket from a discarded i
other young men deck
coffin with gorgeous flow
funeral procession wen
slowly up the winding
end into Melrose and
Meares’s room where th
mony was conducted in
beautiful manner by Sd
ter the service was ov«
taker (Sammy Gale
tucked the casket under
followed by the honorar;
“Fat” Messer, “59
Saunders and Yours Tn
into the wide open spl
fresh air. The pallbe*!
undertaker at the fir«
what became of the
only to Mr. Morse.
Pr
st
ho
3b,
en
t
an
s
p;
I
tl
tbi
be
w
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se'
    

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