North Carolina Newspapers

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A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR
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the.. Hill vs. Leicester
c Ad Stars, Tuesday,
Dec. 15. I
THE HILLTOP
COME AGAIN
READERS AND
DECLAIMERS
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Published Bi-Weekly By The Students of Mars Hill College
MARS HILL, (NORTH CAROLINA, DECEMBER 12, 1931
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m AND CLIOS GIVE ANNIVERSARY PROGRAMS
Kknathians Present Anni-
rsary Program Before
Packed House
ro!
entertain brothers
• Decision Awarded To Affirm
ative Represented By Cox
and Holloway
~~bre a packed house on Satur-
^ght, December 5th, the Phi-
lian Literary Society presented
rty-first anniversary program,
resentation was well received
, ] audience and proved to be one
p; best anniversary programs ev-
2n here.
^ program was opened with the
^fce singing the Alma Mater.
""ring this Professor J. B. Huff
!he invocation. At this juncture
uthalian president was recog-
He made a short speech chai
ns the Phis to put forth their
Efforts when the two societies
d at commencement.
'^fe the regular program began
^^^aul Buck giving a declamation
jd, “Shall America Go Back?”
vas followed by an oration by
r Cole, “The Demand for Chris-
^^ducation.” iNext Joe Farmer
^ well rendered vocal solo en
“The Two Grenadiers.”
^n came the debate. The query
1‘Resolved, That Busses Should
MARS HILL COLLEGE
FULLY ACCREDITED
seed on the Same Basis of Tax-
illas Trains.” H. Clay Cox and
)|1 Holloway set forth the argu-
' of the affirmative, while Mard
an and Wilson Lyday upheld
'^use of the negative. The de-
j was awarded in favor of the
ative.
this juncture the Phi Synco-
rendered several musical num-
During one of the selections
^dience was favored by a voca
jomposed of Pegram Holland,
Hpy Taylor, and Faison Butler,
-ing this M. H. R. Kendall gave.
lUntouched Cross,” a declama
5t an oration entitled, “Shining
ar,” was given by Charles Alex-
Several neAvspapers reporting
the proceedings of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Sec
ondary Schools, Avhich met in
Montgomery, Ala., last week, in
cluded the name of Mai’s Hill Col
lege among the institutions
dropped from the accredited lists.
The error, which caused consid
erable concern among the friends
of the college, was due to a mis
interpretation of the reports of
the association, since junior col
leges doing two years of high
school and two years of college
w’ork are now accredited as one
institution and not tw^o as hereto
fore.
Many perhaps do not know that
Mars Hill is fully accredited in
every accrediting agency in whose
jurisdiction it lies, including the
American Association of Junior
Colleges, the Southern Association
of Colleges and Secondary Schools,
the State Department of Educa
tion, and is approved by the Am
erican Medical Association as an
institution from which students
may be admitted to the standard
medical colleges.
Philomathian Anniversary Representatives
Clios Present La Busca de Los
Pastores As Anniversary
Program
ORIGINAL COMPOSITION USED
Large Audience Attend Last
gram of Anniversary
Series.
Pro-
The forty-first anniversary of the
Clio Literary Society w'as celebrated
in the college auditorium yesterday
evening, December 12, with an oiigi-
nal interpretation of an old Spanish
drama, “La Busca de Los Pastores,”
(“The guest of the Shepherds.”)
Over five hundred witnessed the
program, which exquisitely portrayed
the Christmas theme taken from the
Spanish miracle play of the finding
; — . of the Christ child. Appropriate
Tpft to Rithf Walter Colo, Virgil Holloway, Douthit Furches, H. Clay music was supplied between C“rtajns
^ Cox, Mard Pittman, Wilson Lyday, Paul Buck. | by the Philomathian orchestra ^
Cantata To Be Given
Sunday Evening
College Chorus ,and Orchestra Unite
In Presenting Christmas Cantata
“The Adoration.”
Gym Class To
Give Exhibition
Program Next Thursday Night Prom-
ises Dazzling Array of
Stunts.
“The Adoration,” a cantata of
the Holy Birth, will be presented
Sunday evening, December 13, in
Thirty High
Schools In Contest
by the Philomathian orchestra and a
violin solo, “To the Evening Star,”
by Wagner, played by Elizabeth Den
ham.
After the opening of the program
by the Clio president, Mamie Perry,
by the Giio presiaent, uiamic
Sixth Annual Readers and and the recognition of the Nonpareil
ers Contest Attract Western president, the anniversary play was
N. C. Schools. ‘ ’ ’ -
presented, following which the one
hundred and four members of the Clio
The sixth annual readers’ and de-1 Society formed the Phi emblem ors
The sixth annual reaaers unu society lormea uie x
claimers contest for high schools of Ly^g stage and sang the Society song:
‘^’nndav''evenine December 13, in Western North Carolina opened at Lnd “Clio-Phi.” A reception given
the church, by the college chorus and Mars Hill College on Friday after- Uhe Clios by
nroerram is under noon, December 11, With repr€senta- |ans completed the celebration, whicl
At this time all the Phis left
* hiding and a few moments later
>^red on the stage having gone
^(Continued on page 3)
J
unteer Band
•idles John Anderson
g Volunteer Band has been
ng for the last two weeks the
k a great medical missionary to
; Dr. John T. Anderson,
jsday evening, December 1,
Fox and Ernest Bailes took up
jscussion of his early life and
Sudy of medicine,
the next meeting, December
nnie Hudson told of his last
in the University in Kentucky
, f his work as an interne in a
»al there. Sarah Fox took the
to the Far East where he be-
■is work among the Chinese.
:!■ life of Dr. Anderson is unus-
i interesting, being made even
Pso because of the fact that e
native of South Carolina.
Thursday evening, December 17,
will mark the initiation of a series
of exhibitions to be presented during
the winter months by the special
Gym classes.
This is the first time that an at
traction of just this order has ever
been staged at Mars Hill. The pro
gram will be featured with acrobatic
stunts, including forms of tumbling,
fomvard and backward rolls; front
and back flips; with a host of indi
vidual performances. The main fea
ture, to be given as the closing
event, will be a distance diving con
test over men lined up in succession
on the floor.
The complete program of the main
stands is as follows:
(1) fonvard roll; (2) forward
hand spring, both one and two hands;
(3) forward and backward snap-ups;
(4) back to back flip; (5) backward
flip, stiff leg; (6) backward flip from
thigh; (7) fomvard flip from man m
prone position; (8) forward flip from
man’s feet in prone position; (9)
hand spring from feet of man; (10)
hand stand from shoulders of man;
(11) backward flip from hands of
prone man; (12) strong man, pale
trick; (13) balance trick, man over
(Continued on page 3)
——+
i
Scriblerus Club Has
Program On Drama
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The Scriblerus Club held its regu
lar monthly meeting Tuesday even
ing, December 8, in the Expression
Studio. The program for the even
ing was “Drama During the Restora
tion Period.” Eva Robbins read a
paper on, “Actors and Actresses
During the Restoration;” Katherine
Rollins discussed domestic tragedy
during this age, using as an exam
ple, “A Woman Killed With Kind
ness,” by Thomas Keyword; Kath
leen Gilleland portrayed the comedy
of the period through a paper and
discussion* of “The Way of the
World,” a comedy of manners writ
ten by Congreve.
The following students became
members of the club; Muriel Carroll,
Jeiry Holcomb, Elizabeth Corpening,
Frances Frisbie, Kathleen Smoak,
Gertrude Blaylock, Robbie Grey El
more, Lillian Crowe, Ben Cox, and
Robert James.
orchestra. This program is under
the direction of Miss Zula Coon, Miss
Martha Biggers, and Mrs. D. M. Rob
inson.
The chorus has made several ap
pearances this year, and has always
done exceptionally well. This how
ever, will be the first time this year
that the chorus and orchestra have
given a combined program. Every
one is looking forward to it with a
great deal of anticipation, because
the musical presentations are always
delightful.
The service will open with the con
gregation singing “Joy to the World,’
and “It Came Upon a Midnight
Clear,” followed by the devotional.
A vocal solo, “Jesu Bambino,” will
be sung by Miss Coon, after which
Miss Bonnie Wengert will read “The
Light,” from Ben Hur.
The feature of the program will
be a Cantata, “The Adoration,” writ
ten by Nevin, and sung as follows:
1. Chorus—“O Come All Ye Faith-
ful.”
2. Baritone solo and chorus—“Be
hold a Virgin Shall Conceive.”
3. Soprano solo. Women’s Quartet,
and chorus—“In Reverent Awe
and Solemn State.”
4. .Elen’s Chorus—“Then Sweeping
Through the Arch of Night.”
6. Chorus and Men’s Quartet—
“Softly the Starlight.”
6. Tenor and Soprano solos and chor
us—“And Lo, the Angel of the
Lord.”
7. Women’s and Men’s Quartets and
Chorus—“Glory to God in the
Highest.”
8. Alto solo and chorus—“Hushed^ at
Length the Gracious Song.”
9. Chorus—“Amen! Lord We Bless
Thee.”
Soloists
Sopranos: Frances Frisbie, Mamie
Perx-y.
Alto: Madge Linney.
(Continued on page two)
noon, December 11, with representa
tives from thirty schools participat
ing. The semi-finals were held Friday
aftenxoon and the finals Saturday
morning, the results of which the
Hilltop was unaible to obtain for this
edition.
Representatives from the schools
were as follows: Bakersvile, Russell
Deneen, Argie Lee Byrd; Black
Mountain, Edward Duquy, Edith
Morris; Candler, Stanton Wilson,
Emily Mallone; Cove Creek, Fred
Michael, Leta Gesteer; Flat Creek,
Graham Ponder, Vivian Gentry;
Fruitland Inst., Bruce Dixcon, Bema
Young; Leicester, Vance Rogers,
Gertrude Cox; Reems Creek, Pauline
Westbrook; Robbinsville, Wayne
Barnes, Geneva Sawyer; Rutherford-
Spindale, Garland Hamrick, Nancy
Holler; Sand Hill, George Horton,
Mildred Turner; Stearns, Manus Bar
nette, Edna Hague; Swannanoa,
Paul Allison, Fanny Hutchins; Tip-
ton Hill, Oscar Deyton, Shirley Mas
ters; Waynesville, James H. Howell,
Evelyn Morgan; Weaverville, Oren
Carter, Georgia Ingle; Wilkesboro,
Neil Hartley, Joyce Welborn; Pleas
ant Gardens, Charles Greenlee, Ellen
Wilson; Glenwood, Norman Haney,
Sibyl Spratt; Alexander, Ruth Tate;
Etowah, Ralph Banning, Beulah Can-
'trell; Hayesville, Olen Stratton, Vir
ginia Cherry; Mars Hill, Elizabeth
Fleetwood; Burnsville, John Rey
nolds; Belwood, Sam Sain, Dorris
(Continued on page three)
ians completed the celebration, which
was attended by several alumnae who
were former members of the Clio So
ciety.
“La Busca de Los Pastores” was
originally an old miracle play given
annually under the auspices and di
rection of the Catholic. Church dur
ing the thirteenth, fourteenth, and
fifteenth centuries. The original plot
was altered in this rendition in oblit
erating the idea of Catholicism. The
three acts consisted of scenes depict
ing the beginning of the search for
the Christ child by the shepherds
twelve nights before Chidstmas, their
struggle against temptation, and their
final triumph in the finding of the
new Messiah.
The love story of Romona, a shep
herdess, and Jose, a shepherd, formed
(Continued on page two)
Cleveland County
Club Organizes
Debaters Attend
Forensic Clash
Intercollegiate Teams Are Invited
Asheville Normal and N. C.
State Debate.
Dramatic Club
Has Riley Program
Ruamie Squires Presents Original
Play to Be Used In
State Contest.
On Monday evening, December 7,
the members of the Mars Hill inter
collegiate debating teams went .-x
Asheville to witness the Forensic
clash between Asheville Normal and
North Carolina State College. The
query was: “Resolved, That Con^^s
Should Enact Legislation Providing
for Centralized Control of Industry.
It was decided that all doubt as to
the constitutionality of the enactment
be waived from the query.
Reports coming from our delegates
were to the effect that the debate
(Continued on page 3)
Twenty-three Students From Cleve
land County Here This
Year.
Twenty - three students from
Cleveland County, in order to profit
from the benefits of closer friend
ship and better understanding, have
organized a Cleveland County Club.
It is sincerely hoped that the quality
of w'ork done by this group may be
even more outstanding in comparison
(Continued on page three)
On Tuesday evening, December 14
the students of the Expression De
partment gave a Riley program in
form of a recital. Douthit Furches
impersonated James Whitcomb Riley,
Thomas Moore was the servant. Some
of Riley’s poems were read by the
following: _
“The Bear Story,” Neil Whitaker;
“Mamie’s Story of Little Red Riding
Hood,” Louise Gillian, “An Old
Sweetheart of Mine,” Flora Huff
man; “When the Frost is On the
Punkin/’ Ruth Robertson; “Hlmer
Brown,” Calvin Stringfield; “Our
Hired Girl,” Mildred DeWeese;
“Twins,” Grace West; “Our Hired
Man,” Elizabeth Corpening; “Down
Around the River,” Pearl Howell;
“There, Little Girl, Don’t Cry,” Eliz-
(Continued on page three)
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