North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two.
THE HILLTOP, MARS HILL COLLEGE, MARS HILL, NORTH CAROLINA.
CThe Hilltop
“Plain Living and High Thinking’
Published by the Students of Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, North
Carolina.
Entered as second-class matter February 20, 1926, at the Post-
office at Mars Hill, North Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Issued semi-monthly during the college year.
Subscription Rate Year $1.00 . Issue 6c
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS
DISTRIBUTOR OF COLLEGIATE DIGEST
STAFF
Editor-in-Chief John Foster West
Managing Editor William R. Gabbert
FACULTY ADVISORS
Mildred Hardin Ramon DeShazo
Eleanor B. Church Rachel Templeton
CONTRIBUTORS
Henry Huff . Delta Cole . Fred Glazener . Robbie Gold Stockton
Bruce Hudson . Marjorie Parker . Betty Lee Spainhour . Eloise
Dobson . Margaret Caldwell . Rebecca Horton . Sarah Curtis . Mary
Lillian Culpepper . Maxine Eller . Henry Anderson . Mary Lee
Ellington . Jimmy James . Edward Clark . David McAdams . James
Eller . Maureen Bennett . Nena Barr . Fred Ellison
Doris Wood . Russell Jordon . Wane Ware
Business Manager Bill Byrd
Circulation Managers Jack Green and Winfred Thompson
Advertising Manager Kenneth E. Davis
Volume XVI. October 11, 1941. Number 2.
Young Men Dream-
It is beautiful, it is life for the old men to do and the young
men to dream dreams, but when an old man still dreams of
his youthful visions it is tragic; for he has missed the road
where reality branches off.
This man walked down an aisle between huge machines.
He commanded; they roared to life, and beautiful things were
wrought. Rugs, silk draperies and Oriental pottery, beautiful
paintings—everything a god would desire was created. It was
all his. He walked across a grassy plain between blooming
mimosa trees. Bees droned and birds song from above. He
strolled up to the door of a marble chateau, his home.
He looked at his surroundings; he smiled at the gifts with
which he was blessed. Suddenly a hazy moisture enveloped
his brain; when it cleared he was lying down; he had fallen.
The man was lying on a dark and putrid heap of refuse. It
was dank and black, with an appearance of age; hoar frost
had gathered on the Stygian mass. He clutched a handful and
held it before his eyes with a wrinkled, trembling hand, an
aged hand. He recognized it! Something out of that mass
seemed to whisper of things he half knew but were not meant
for life. His dreams—that was it! He was lying on his dreams
and they were heaped no higher above the earth, than the
effort of the thought that conceived them.
Dreams are beautiful things, but they are only silken
draperies behind which the young man builds his life.—J.F.W.
America s Autumn-
Over America is falling the many-hued arm of Autumn.
"God's Country" is' being clothed in a coat of many colors
and the beauties of nature are inspiring and uplifting to
all who look upon them. Yet consider with me a moment;
this is not only a physical autumn, but a spiritual one as
well.
Autumn is the season in which nature girds herself for
the rigors of the winter to come. America must gird herself for
a spiritual winter as well as for a physical one. Never before
has so much attention been put on the material side of
existence, and so little or. the spiritual. On every side, men
are laying up in store for themselves "where moth and rust
doth corrupt," with no thought for "treasures in heaven."
The questions of the day concern war. America is in the
autumn period concerning war. She has the beauty of a
nation in great prosperity and is clad in a vivid coat of wealth.
She has not yet experienced the hard winter of war, but is yet
reaping the benefits without paying the price.
Soon, too soon, America will find herself in the winter of
war. But now she is still in the autumn before the cold; in the
sunset before the night. Autumn is the time to prepare for
winter. America must return to the principles upon which she
was founded if she is to survive the winter that is to come,
and see the down of the spring of peace and good-will to
men.
The founders of our country were God-fearing, reverent men;
and it is to such a spirit that America must return. It is now that
she must return, in her autumn, not in the dire stress of her
winter.
Temperance Reading
Contests Conducted
Valuable Medals
Awarded
Temperance reading con
tests, offering silver and gold
medals, as well as practical
speaking experience, are to be
conducted on our campus this
fall. The contests are to be
sponsored by the Women's
Christian Temperance Union,
represented by Mrs. Cornelia
Vann, who is devoting much
of her time to their promotion.
At present, it is believed that
the contests will be conducted
by the men's and women's
literary societies of the college.
The rules governing the con
tests are that no less than five
or more than seven may com
pete in one contest, but there
may be several contests in
progress at one time. If there
are seven contestants, the
winner of the first reading
drops out. The remaining six
present their readings to an
other audience, and the winner
of this contest drops out. The
remaining five present their
readings to another audience,
and this winner drops out. In
this way there are three win
ners of silver medals in each
contest. •
The gold medal contest fol-
(Continued on Page 4)
South America Bound
(Continued from Page 1)
while in Rio: I saw advertise
ments for _Dr. Scholl's Footpads,
Tangee Lipstick, Remington
Typewriters, and Elizabeth
cosmetics, as well as Ameri
can movies and automobiles.
"I discovered also that
American money went much
further than Brazilian, although
clothes are far more expen
sive. A stenographer gets from
thirty fo sixty dollars a month
if she can take English and
Spanish dictation. There are
many opportunities ■ for Span
ish speaking Americans.
"Once while shopping I was
asked the reason for my hurry.
South Americans are very de
liberate and prefer a long time
to decide about the smallest
matter. For example, the day
before my boat was due to
sail back to the States, I
wished to get some back copies
of the "Buenos Aires Stand
ard." The girl in charge could
not get over the fact that I
wanted them right away, but
wished to think about it for a
day or two before giving them
to me. When I at last per
suaded her of the necessity
of having them at once, she
handed me all the copies I
needed from a nearby shelf.
There is no doubt about the
fact of their annoying de
liberateness!
"In Rio, they really drive
like the wind, and I saw two
accidents in twenty-four hours.
"It seems almost impossible
to believe there are six times
as many cattle and ten times
as many sheep as there ore
people in South America, but
this is the case. Despite the
South American peculiarities,
1 am really crazy about their
country and had a wonderful
vacation with them."
Miss Church had her feature
stories published in the follow
ing papers: Greensboro Daily
News, Charlotte Observer,
Durham Herald-Sun and the
Detroit News.
SUBVERSIVE
ACTIVITIES
Activities on all fronts are
proceeding according to sched
ule. The attack of the male di
vision on the northern sector
is proving to be no "scram"
battle. However, sabotage is
suspected among the ranks as
many candid cameras go into
play. It was reported that on
extensive gas attack wasi
launched in the barracks of
the male division. The enemy
supposedly producing the at
tack has been identified as
the polecat division. However,
none of its number has been
intercepted, according to the
latest communique from Gen
eral Smell.
Casualties and barbed-wire
entanglements: The military
maneuvers of Pvt. Owen Phil
lips have evidently struck a
Wall. As yet she has not found
a way around it. However,
sister Pat Phillips has been suc
cessful in an attack upon the
Martin division of the formid
able Anderson squadron, and
it seems that Arthur has turned
Hunter. A Greene recruit has
just been added to the Duck
worth infantry. Lieut. J. Carlton
Jones of the Whoops corps be
lieves in close cooperation
from his assistant. General
Douglas Aldrich has followed
Washington's policy and en
tered into no foreign entangle
ments.
Casualities from the ad
vanced front of Wake Forest
are reported to be returning
rapidly. It has been guaran
teed that nurses for these
wounded severely will be
plentiful. The drill squadron of
N. C. State sent a special re
cruit into "Middle-town" area.
Authorities are still investi
gating the bombardment of
second shifters in the mess hall
several nights ago .... Captain
Perry Ingle doesn't seem to
balk at having a Thorne at
his side . . . Soldier of
Fortune Gregory has recently
been observed gazing soulfully
at a Violet.
A ten-gun salute to; Mary
for her heroic stand. When sur
rounded in her dugout and sent
on ultimatum upon two oc
casions Mary Blunt-ly refused
to surrender—to: Major Jack
Lucke for the generalship he
used in ousting Mata Hara
Lumpkin, the gowned spy
hidden in our editor's closet
ALUMNUS IN AIR
CORPS
James C. Graves, Mors
Hill alumnus, is one step
nearer his wings as he
climbs the grade in the
United States Army Air
Corps. With the second leg
of his flying instruction com
pleted at Goodfellow Field,
the basic flying school at
San Angelo, Texas, Aviation
Cadet Graves has been
ordered to Kelly Field, Texas,
where he will enter the
final ten months of advanced
flight training required to
earn the wings of a flying
officer in the United States
Army Air Corps Reserve.
James S. Graves was
graduated from Mors Hill
college in 1935. While here
he was greatly interested in
tennis. He is the son of Dr.
and Mrs. C. D. Graves of
Dublin, Georgia.
ALPHA TO OMEGA
By Eait
5
If you attend a presentation
of the glee club this year you
will hear Helen Hayes singing
soprano and Samuel Johnson
singing tenor. A stroll about
the circle will bring to your
^yes Robert Browning sprawled
on the grass, reading, his great
coat wrapped tightly about
him. Near by you will prob
ably find Robert Taylor lean
ing against anything he can
find and dreaming of—who
knows what?
By the way. Miss Ellison's
glee club should prove quite
on attraction this year. In the
soprano section she has a
Drake and a Lyon; in the tenor
section is a Duck, and in the
bass is Robbins. The alto
section boasts a Lyon and a
Lamb side by side and on the
best of terms.
"Footsie" Faile asked Dean
Carr what happened to Peter
Stuyvesant os New Amster
dam loomed on the historical
horizon. Everything was ex
plained when a student in
formed the class that Peter had
died long ago. Later that day
John James broke the historical
news to the world that fifty
percent of all married people
were women.
Last Friday night the campus
resounded to the melodious
words of someone singing
"Hut sut Rollison on the River-
mont—". When one works for
two hours with a microscope
and still can't find any cells
in his body it is time to be
come worried.
And now people are asking
where "Hatch" Crenshaw puts
his teeth at night.
to: Pvt. Winfred Thompson for
his recent diplomatic activity
on the Hendersonberg line.
An air alarm was heard
from south of Edna Moore
Mountain recently under the
control of Joe Gardner and
Ruth Beattie. No planes were
sighted, but three scouting
parties did duck to cover three
jumps ahead of Edwards and
Brissie of the mapping deport
ment. Fredia Davis uses a
great deal of Kraft against the
Harper - oners who have
gained control of general pro
visions. A recent report from
the propaganda department
states that P. F. C. Jack Greg
ory, orderly of Major James
Amos, lingers too long with the
dispatches between Major
Amos and McColman head
quarters.
Flash! A late communique
states that Bill Rigsbee, on the
trail of a force known to in
formation only as "Butter" got
lost in the California creek
Canyon during night maneu
vers. The same night General
George Fail-ed to obtain on
orderly simply because he
thought he could work better
alone.
For those who wonder, the
propaganda ministry is, at
present, composed of a num
ber of fifth columnists.
Your Fifth Columnists.
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