North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two.
THE HILLTOP, MARS HILL COLLEGE, MARS HILL, NORTH CAROLINA.
Q*he Hilltop
‘Plain Living and High Thinking’
Published by the Students of Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, North
Carolina.
Entered as second-class matter February 20, 1926, at the Post-
office at Mars Hill, North Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Issued semi-monthly during the college year.
Subscription Rate Year $1.00 . Issue 5c
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS
DISTRIBUTOR OF COLLEGIATE DIGEST
THE HILLTOPPERS
Editor-in-Chief John Foster West
Managing Editor William R. Gahbert
FACULTY ADVISORS
Mildred Hardin Ramon DeShazo
“The Importance Of Being Earnest”
Eleanor B. Church
Rachel Templeton
CONTRIBUTORS
Eleanor Israel . Fred Ellison . Henry Huff . Mary Lillian Culpepper
Maureen Bennett . Rebecca Horton . Edward Clark . David McAdams
Eleanor Ingram .Eloise Dobson . Bernette Selph . Bruce Hudson
Gertie B. Watts . Russell Jordan . Doris Wood . Sarah Curtis
Business Manager Bill Byrd
Circulation Managers Jack Green and Winfred Thompson
Advertising Manager Kenneth E. Davis
Volume XVI.
October 25, 1941.
Number 3.
Oh, Politics, Where Is Thy Sting?-
Each day we read of fire and famine, death and distruction
Everywhere headlines scream of catastrophe; our radios blare
out news of invasion, subjection and slavery. Admitted! But
what is behind it all? What power has been responsible for
such drastic consequences? You question the fact that such
a power does exist?
This force, politics, is the little ragged stepson of the ambitious
man. This ragged urchin was taken by man, fed, and nourished
back to life and given a home. Now he is tearing the world
of man to bits. He sits back and smiles like a good boy; yet
his master deals out destruction under his hypnotic power.
Politics was born when man first became ambitious for
power. One cave man, deciding that he wanted to be ruler
bribed the king's brother with a boiled bear's leg to hit the
king in the head from behind a tree. This was accomplished,
and a new leader came into power by "politics." Such is the
very essence of the science of politics.
International politics, staking power against power, hurling
nation against nation, can be blamed for the mess the world
is in today. It is clever to call diplomats envoys or statesmen,
but a few who dare not squawk know them to be international
politicians. You know it. You know that one man is empowered
with the authority to buy or to sell the destiny of a people and
that he is the tool of politics. Some day we shall awake to
the unpleasant truth. Reform will start with our schools and
spread abroad. We shall wipe the onion from under our noses
instead of shoveling dirt over the rotten cabbage at our feet.
Democratic education is too wise to tolerate such underhanded
methods of government!
Getting back down to earth, important class elections on
Mars Hill campus are coming up soon. Whom would you like
to hold a certain offipe? You would? All right, vote for him,
then. If he is the man you think can do the job, prove it with
your vote.—J. F. W.
Why Literary Societies?-
The purpose of speech is to make someone sign on the
dotted line. So a professor of English recently said in a large
southern college. Nowhere on the campus is better training
given in speech than in the literary societies; after all, an
individual learns by doing, and in the societies, the member,
of necessity, must stand upon his own two feet and speak
often.
Study Or Travel?
MUSIC NOTES
As the time grows near for the anniversaries, both societies
are buckling down to what will be a contest of brains. Since
the faculty has placed certain financial restrictions on the
amount that both shall spend, this will be a contest of ingenuity
rather than pocketbooks.
Via the grapevine, the news is out that the Philomathians
and the Euthalians have plans already under way for a
new type of anniversary finale. Simplicity will be the key note,
and the whole school is looking forward to highly impressive
programs that will linger in the memory.
By David McAdams
Orchestra:
The orchestra, which is com
posed of approximately twenty
members, has been working
hard at two rehearsals a week
in preparation for the opening
performance, the date of which
will be announced soon. The
large number of C-Ts playing
in the orchestra this year have
greatly strengthened it. Mr.
Sebren and the orchestra are
working on a varied selection
of compositions, classical, and
semi- classicial exclusively.
Sectional rehearsals are to be
held regularly each week, at
which time the different sec
tions will practice away from
the rest of the orchestra.
Band:
On Wednesday, October 22,
the concert band was heard in
chapel. A program consisting
of marches and symphonic se
lections was enthusiastically
received by the students and
faculty. The band has already
made a name for itself through
several highly acclaimed ap
pearances. At the football
games the bond has given re
newed spirit to the players on
the field as well as to the
spectators in the stands. At the
half-time during these games,
thrilling maneuvers executed
by the band have brought
much applause.
Record Library:
Have you visited the record
library yet? The Carnegie
Foundation has presented Mars
Hill with a record set and six
hundred records to be used
and enjoyed by the many stu
dents who appreciated good
music. The daily schedule of
the record library will be found
elsewhere in the paper.
In reply to my question, "Did
you study or travel during the
summer?" Mr. De Shozo told
me of his interesting trip to
Los Angeles, where he and
Mrs. De Shazo attended the
University of Southern Cali
fornia.
"A short distance from Los
Angeles is the Isle of Santa
Catalina, where Wrigley has
one of his homes, surrounded
by some of the most beautiful
mountain and ocean scenery,"
said Mr. De Shazo.
After making special mention
of seeing the famous mosaic
picture, "The Lord's Supper,"
at the Memorial Park, he told
of their visit to Hollywood,
where they witnessed several
programs in which the stars
participated.
"Five to eleven hours each
day were spent in studying,"
Mr. DeShazo stated; "so we
really had little time left to
see the other points of in
terest."
Don't worry, Mr. and Mrs.
De Shazo. We are sure you
studied!
Miss Logan went to Harvard
this summer. After studying
there for several weeks she
traveled by the coast of Maine
and from there went to Can
ada.
"In Quebec," remarked Miss
Logan, "ninety percent of the
News A-head
Bong! Bang! What is this
generation coming to? Mars
Hill College is certainly go
ing to the heads of some of
the girls. At least they seem
to be going daffy with a
bang. The boys are interest
ed in making "headlines,"
too, with monkey cut-ups
and new colors. There's no
end to the light - haired
swains on the campus who
were once considered per
fect brunettes. If you really
want the attention of the
girls, boys, run — don't
walk — to the nearest drug
store for a bottle of per
oxide.
And, girls, if you do not
desire the attention of the
boys, join up with the
"bang" club.
DAVID DORR
Our Apologies To
The Classical Club
The HiUtop wishes to opolo-
gize for failing to present in
fo r m a t i o n concerning the
Classical Club when the honor
clubs were presented in our
last edition. The Classical
Club, sponsored by Mr. J. W.
Huff, is the oldest honor club
on the campus and one of
the most important.
The club held its first meet
ing on Tuesday evening, Oc
tober 14. The program consist
ed of a number of presenta
tions, "A Madman on the
Throne"—Carl Harris; "The
Death of Nero" — Dorothy
Chandler; "The Burning of
Rome '—Mary Fredenburg.
Members of the club are
honor students in Latin and
Greek. Officers of the Classical
Club ore David Dorr, Presi
dent; Dorothy Chandler, vice-
president; William Crowder,
secretary; Ronda Robbins, de
votional leader; Carl Harris, re
porter; Mary Ellen Fredenburg,
chairman of social activities.
people ore French, and only
the baggage masters con speak
broken English. ... It woS"
eight o'clock in the afternoon
when I arrived at Quebec,
and the chiming of the vesper
bells completed the typical
scene of the white, wooden
hotels with their picturesque
iron balconies nestled in the
heart of the city."
Other places visited were
Toronto, Montreal, and in the
States, Paul Revere's Drive,
and the home of Alcott, Haw
thorne, Emerson and others.
These are some of the activi
ties of a small group of our
teachers, and later we shall
tell more about recent trips of
the faculty.
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