North Carolina Newspapers

    >mber 28. ISsptember 28, 1963
THE HILLTOP. MARS HILL COLLEGE. MARS HILL. N. C.
Page Three
^Ane viiss Swann Finds Holy Land Trip Here Come SKWINKS
/^z^or^xciting, Strenghtening To Faith
The inning Skwink
3T to the hec
much disci „
Miss Edith Swann, college Bur-
ide magozirij.^ spent approximately four
illel in unfceeks this past summer on an
o long it tak^edean Express Tour of the
iving studer*^^^ Land. Leaving Mars Hill on
Miss Swann flew to New
, ora and on to Rome where she
years m trar,w st. Peters cathedral and the
practice untacombs where Christian mar-
some of tfrs once awaited their death. Be-
on campus'”®® funeral services for Pope
3hn the group was unable to see
le world-renown Sistine Chapel,
lys agree wi Egypt was the next country
teacher Here Miss Swann’s group
haincomploj!™®/
ot bartering with local mer-
3re are spechants. One night the group camp-
nake the lord on the desert which proved to
>s this sounP interesting experience. Rid-
the ease ^ camel and seeing the great
cose. ^
mt of schodiss Swann.
if the press Beirut, Lebanon, scene of the
will see an World Youth Congress, was
s beyond tour. Miss Swann tells
f 1 ^ many interesting things learned
IS fa se 1 thig ai.ga_ -pjjg group learned
through mcf the Persians and the construc-
w present of an alphabet as well as see-
ig ancient Roman ruins at Sidon
nd the Bekaa valley. To see Da-
y vs. quonhascus, scene of many of Christ’s
n to be givi*®'fs> was thrilling and very in-
beginning”.'^®®*'*”^ because of the mosques
'ith their exquisite beauty. This
iso proved to be an excellent
By Departm^opping place,
twime scho high-light of the trip was the
_ roup was able to view the Prom-
*0*^ Land as Moses did centuries
jinia and Ck^°‘ Jordan River, supposed
uts in the ie'L°f
, to the visit in Jordan.
D read and I Near Bethany, scene of Jacob’s
ere required'oU, Miss Swann and the other
vacation red"^®*'’® people in her touring
3le to read scrolls written in the
much time C ”®®®- The scrolls were
j j, ” fhe visitors by the priests,
prevented d^ in the Church of the Sepulcher
ing during the group saw a tomb which is
[ding for plei**ought to have been that of
ler things.
a stoutly tli
part of "a pjl
'en to grow ?
ve more tbil
Christ’s; but only a short dis
tance away in Gordon’s Garden
was a tomb in the hillside’s cave
which seemed more realistic. The
group was told they could accept
the place they thought to be the
true tomb of Christ. Skull-shaped
and repulsive, Golgotha overlook
ed this as a constant reminder of
the burden it bore so long ago.
While in Jerusalem, Miss Swann
also visited the Baptist church
and bookstore.
Leaving Jordan behind, they
crossed the “no man’s land” into
Israel where they visited David’s
tomb and observed a communion
supper with all the different de
nominations of the group partici
pating except the guide, who was
Catholic. In Nazareth they learn
ed of the people’s new way of life
on the Kibbutz or collective Jew
ish farms. They also visited the
ruins at Appo and came down the
coast to Caesarea.
From the Holy Land the tour
left for Athens, Greece, where
they saw the Olympic Stadium and
ancient ruins. The next stop was
Switzerland, which Miss Swann
believes, “was the most beautiful
place and we only stayed such a
short time.” A trip through the
famous Alps and into a glacier
were the highlights of this coun
try. Miss Swann describes the
green, rolling meadows, purple
snow-capped mountains, and blue
sky as “a picture too great for
words.”
In Paris, the Eiffel Tower
proved just a little more of a
challenge than had been expected,
but the group visited the histori
cal tomb of Napoleon and the
Notre Dame Cathedral. It seems
that language was no barrier un
til the group came to Prance, but
here everyone insisted upon
speaking only French instead of
the broken English heard every
where else.
During the last days of June,
the places of direct relation to
is a discipliill
might os v/S
acher. Feelig
me, accorc
le one who |
n seem to
DO much wo
:ertain amo'lj
expected of|i
faculty m^
me week, p|;
e done in of
h courses
could go.
nds one w^
done the m
.omework st
to space th^
tester and
ssigning hd
ng given?
^ are given [
meet a de
o learn, ar^
ul purpose!
essential,
[ feel that
Dcess.
A#
More fun than money!
'4 K£w
eoLOioNa ^
Inia§^ne scooping up a complete lipstick uxtrdrobe (a 6.25 value!)
at this “litUe nothing” price! Everything from naked pastels to
lajy, crazy corals to wicked, way-out pinks! Each lipstick in a
colorful “show-off case”—too chic to keep imder cover! (Don’t
miss it—iifs Summer’s most beautiful bargain!)
,, MARS HILL PHARMACY ,
Christ were seen: the manger,
which was only a hollowed-out
stone in a grotto or cave, the grot
to of the Holy family, the place
of ascension where there still re
mains a footprint which is sup
posed to have been left by Jesus,
the Garden of Gethsemane, and
the road Christ walked to Cal
vary.
After a brief plane trip to Lon
don, the group visited the British
Museum, saw the crown jewels
and the play Oliver, which is tak
en from the novel Oliver Twist.
They also visited Wesley’s Chapel
since most of the group con
sisted of Methodists who wanted
to view their founder’s memorial,
and Westminister Abby where the
famous men of England found a
final resting place.
Because it was Sunday, the
tourists could not see the students
in their traditional gowns when
they visited Oxford University.
The home of Anne Hathaway,
Shakespeare’s wife, and Strat-
ford-on-Avon fulfilled the Eng
lish visit. Even though London
was dim and dirty, England seem
ed to have beautiful scenery that
is undescribable.
Closing an adventuresome ex
pedition, rewarding experience,
and life-long memory, the group
flew back to New York. For 31
days Miss Swann was a tourist,
enjoyed the sights of foreign
countries, and actually walked the
lands where Christ once walked.
There were precious moments of
inspiration and a closer feeling of
the realness of God.
Most impressive about the jour
ney were the devotionals the
group held each time they visited
a Biblical place. At these times
one would read the scriptural ref
erence and occasionally some song
of like description would be sung.
The way of life also remains in
Miss Swann’s thoughts because
the people in Jordan want to live
in the past with tents, shepherds
and ancient customs, but the peo
ple in Israel are proud of the ad
vancements they have made into
the modern world.
An abundance of different
events, places, and things made
up the wonderful “trip of a life
time.” The scenery, people, mis
sionaries, hot weather, dry lands,
camel rides, early morning hours,
and nice flying all served as a
small part of a vast experience.
All-American SKWINK of 1963
Miss Swann stated, “The thing
that impressed me most was the
tomb in the hillside in Gordon’s
Garden because it seemed to be
more realistic and what people
think of as the burial place of
Christ because the churches and
other places have been commer
cialized so very much. Another
important fact is that after so
long I finally got to take a vaca
tion.” It seems to have been a
very worthwhile summer and a
well-deserved vacation for Miss
Swann.
New Commission
Takes Action
Six recommendations regarding
campus regulations were approved
recently by the Commission of the
new Student Government and
sent to the Senate. A seventh
recommendation, entitled “Smok
ing for Young Women,” was tem
porarily tabled.
The approved recommendations
concerned line-breaking in the
cafeteria, unnecessary destruc
tion of property, bottle rolling,
water fights, ringing of fire bells
and unnecessary disturbances.
In other action the Commission
.elected Joyce Dunlap recording
secretary and Terry Sinclair judi
cial secretary. A judicial review
committee was selected, consist
ing of Alan Clark, D. J. Hughes,
Charles Young, Gene Hawkins,
Jack Hughes and Miss Sinclair.
Student Government Treasurer
Gary Brookshire reported $2,284
on hand to be divided among the
four classes and any phase of
student government which r e -
quires some expenditure.
t . t
t Newest Hits and Greatest Albums t
t t
I SEE OUR SELECTION OF |
I 45 AND 33-1/3 RECORDS |
I Strictly Pay and Play |
I MARS HILL 5 & 10 I
THE
MARS HILL
SODA SHOPPE
Where It's Fun To Eat
Phone 689-2501
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Coed Captures
Contest Coat
Throw away your fox furs,
girls, and stop dreaming of mink.
They’re both passe.
A new symbol of style and com
fort is about to hit the market
in women’s winter coats. It’s
the SKWINK, a lovable creature
that is neither animal, human nor
spirit but embodies the finest
features of all three.
Creator of this long-sought
character is Ann Lorraine Wil
son of Charlotte, a sophomore art
student right here at Mars Hill.
But let’s tell the story from
the very beginning:
Alarmed by the advances made
in recent years in the production
of fur-like materials being used
in the manufacture of women’s
coats, the purveyors of real furs
lobbied the state legislature into
passing a law prohibiting the ma
kers of ‘like-fur” materials from
using that specific term in de
scribing and advertising their pro
ducts.
This set the ‘like-fur” producers
looking for a symbol which would
embody all the features desirable
and yet not trespass the law.
Finally they decided on a name,
SKWINK; but still no one knew
what a SKWINK looked like.
As a result, CHARLOTTE OB
SERVER columnist and Mars
Hill alumnus Kays Gary launched
a contest. It sought entries from
talented artists and imaginative
persons who could create a
SKWINK. Nearly 200 entries
were submitted. Many of them
were clever and cute, but Ann’s
entry was judged the winner. It
is shown here with permission
of Mr. Gary, who had both the
drawing and the name copy
righted.
Ann’s prize will be a SKWINK
coat given by the Blumenthal
Division of Burlington Mills.
“It took about four hours be
fore my SKWINK thinker really
worked,” Ann explained. “It was
that long before I was satisfied
with it.” .
The result is obvious — it’s a
perfect creation! Who can think
SKWINK and hate? Who can
think SKWINK and be a hypo
crite? Who can think SKWINK
and fail?
4”A**A*'4"A’'A*'A"A’*A”A’4'4'*A'*A’*A»4’4*4*'A’'A"A*'A"A**A'
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^ Bring Your Weejun Shoes
I Or Others To %
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MARS HILL
GLEANERS
& LAUNDRY
Seli-Service Laundry
OPEN
FROM 7 A.M. TO 11 P.M.
IM ARS
■ ^ H O E
IS
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For Repair
Located Behind
Mors Hill Hardware
    

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