North Carolina Newspapers

    .976
cps
VOLUME XLX,NUMBER 15
MARS HILL, NORTH CAROLINA
FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1976
ey
of
ry
a
ob
n,
up
ns
ng
is
er
ut
tie
en
as
or
on
as
t-
le
on
a
ar
ig
as
js
le
Largest Class
Graduate
Mars Hill College
will graduate its
largest class in the
Baptist - related
school’s 120 - yehr
history. The class
of 1976 will receive
degrees and diplomas
during the college's
commencement exerci
ses Sunday, May 16.
Between 310 and
317 students are ex
pected to me’et gra
duation requirement's,
according to regis
trar Robert Chapman.
The largest previous
class was 1974, when
296 students were
graduated.
The formal gradua
tion exercises are
slated for 3 p.m. in
Moore Audltorixim,with
an organ recital
scheduled for 30 mi
nutes beforehand.
Baccalaureate ser
vices for the gradu
ates and their fami
lies will also be
held in the 1800 seat
auditorium at 10:45
a.m. with the congre
gation of the Mars
Hill Baptist Church.
The Honorable Jo
Graham Foster of
Charlotte, a member
of the North Carolina
General Assembly,will
deliver the address.
Mrs. Foster is a
member of the House
of Representatives
and serves on the
powerful joint sub
appropriations com
mittee as well as
seven other important
legislative commit
tees.
The address by Mrs.
Foster will mark the
first time a woman
has been invited to
deliver the principle
commencement address
at Mars Hill. Her
address is entitled
"Upon What Do You
Base Your Values?" A
native of South Caro
lina and the daughter
of a Methodist mi
nister, Mrs. Foster
is a graduate of Co
lumbia College, Co
lumbia, S. C. She
taught school in
Sumter, S. C., Ft.
Meade, Md., and at
Thomasboro High
School. She has
served as assistant
principal at West
Hecklenburg Hieh
School and currently
is an assistant in
the Department of
Management for the
Charlotte -Mecklenburg
School system.
She has served as
president and also
secretary of the
Charlotte-Mecklenburg
unit of the N. C.
Educators Association.
CollegeCostsIncrease
The Executive Com
mittee of the Board
of Trustee?, actijag
on the recommendation
of the sub-committees
of the board, has ap
proved the charges
for the 1976—77 col
lege year. (See C^art)
Even with these in
creases, Mars Hill
College will remain
one of the least ex
pensive private col
leges in this and sur
rounding states.
The cause of these
Increases are attri
buted to:
1) Cost of lelectri-
city has increased
100% in two years.The
electric bill for the
college next year is
anticipated to be
$111,000 compared to
$75,000 this year and
$50,000 the year be
fore.
2) Other utilities
have exceeded the
budget by $30,000
this year.
3) Telephone costs
for basic service
(excluding long-dis
tance) has increased
from $24,000 to
$32,000 in 1975-76
and will carry over
to 1976-77.
4) College insu
rance has increased
by $3,000 for 1976-77
5) Social Security
increases have cost
the college $4,000.
6) Though cost of
living for faculty
and staff rose by 12
per cent in 1975-76
and 9 per cent in
1976—77, the college
was able to grant o
per cent salary in
creases plus fringe
benefits in each of
these years. Even sq
the total costs of
these inc::eases amoun
ted to $180,000 for
1976-77.
7) The food cost
incurred by Epicure
have caused them to
increase their annual
costs by $30 which is
an actual increase of
4^5 cents per meal.
8) Other supplies
have increased by an
average of 20 per
cent.
9) Increases in fees
by $10. The money
generated by this in
crease (result of
student entertainment
(concerts, dances,
movies, etc.)
The net effect of
expense increases
means that the total
college operating
budget has increased
from $4,909,417 in
1975-76 to $5,257,980
in 1976-77. Of the
$348,563 difference
the student source of
income will account
for $322,000 and the
continued on page 8
She is also a member
of Delta Kappa Gamma,
an international
honorary teachers'
society.
Mrs. Foster is ac
tive in the Dllworth
Methodist Chruch,
where she serves on
the board of stewards,
is a lay speaker, and
teaches an adult Sun
day School class. Du
ring the 1972 F.H.A.
convention, Mrs.
Foster was cited as
one of the three most
outstanding educators
in North Carolina.
Saturday, May 15,
will be Alumni Day
with several hundred
former students ex
pected for a full a-
genda of events. The
Alumni Association,
which lists 18,000
members,' will hold
its annual business
MRS. FOSTER
Cormenaement Speaker
in Belk Auditorium.
Immediately following
the business session
class reunions will
be held in Wren Col
lege Union. Those
holding 5th-year get-
togethers are the
classes of 1911,1916,
etc.
The annual alumni
banquet is scheduled
for 5:30 p.m. in the
college cafeteria. It
will be the occassion
for honoring out
standing alumni and
making 25-year ser
vice awards to mem-
oontinued on page 8
Nineteen Hundred and Seventy-Six
COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM
A4ARS HILL COLLEGE
Friday, May The Fourteenth
4t00 P.M. Art Exhibit Opens, Fine Arts Building
Saturday, May The Fifteenth
10:00 A.M. Meeting of the Board of Trustees
12:00 Noon Joint luncheon Meeting of the Board of
Trustees and the Board of Advisors
3:30 P.M. Business Meeting of the Alumni Association
Belk Auditorium, Wren College Union
4:00 P.M. Class Reunions -- 1911, 1916, 1921, 1926, 1931,
1936, 1941, 1946, 1951, 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971
5:30 P.M. Alumni Banquet
8:00 P.M. ATumni Pops Concert
The Department of Music
Moore Auditorium
Sunday, May The Sixteenth
11:00 A.M. Baccalaureate Service, Moore Auditorium
Speaker: ^
Honorable Jo Graham Foster
North Carolina House of Representatives
Raleigh, North Carolina
2:30 P.M. Organ Recital, Moore Auditorium
3:00 P.M. Graduation Exercises, Moore Auditorium
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view