North Carolina Newspapers

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The Roanoke Rapids Herald
VOLUME NINETEEN_ ROANOKE RAPIDS, N. C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd, 1933 NUMBER THIRTY-TWO
sgg FOUL PLAY
Paved Avenue Assured City
UP AND DOWN
"Ghe Avenue
WITH THE EDITOR
There were 22,247 bales of
cotton ginned in Halifax Coun
ty prior to November 1, 1933,
as compared with 17,115 bales
to November 1, 1932.
High School students gathered
around a huge fire last Thursday
night on the eve of the last foot
ball game of the season. It was a
joyous occasion with speeches from
players, coaches and teachers,
school yells and songs. Captain
Gaylord, clad in a black derby,
made his farewell speech and fol
lowed it up with two touchdowns
the next day. Everybody had a
good time.
The director for the Kiwanis
Minstrel arrived in Roanoke
Rapids last night. Rehearsals
will start tonight. The show
will be staged the night of
December 8th.
I
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Alford
announce the birth of an eight
pound baby boy at 10:15 Wednes
day morning, at their home on
Washington Avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. Alford have one
other son, four-years old. Mr. Al
ford is manager of the Sanitary
Barber Shop, Uptown, and they
have lived in Roanoke Rapids for
some time.
i
Mrs. R. L. Towe was called
out of town on Thursday of
last week on account of the
illness and death of her fath
er, Mr. Winslow, of Winfall,
N. C.
There will be a Turkey Supper
in the basement of the First Bap
tist Church next Tuesday night
from 6 p. m. until 8 p. m. The
proceeds will go to the church
building fund.
For some reason, the extra
copies of the Herald which
are now in greatest demand
are of that edition which car
ried the muchly discussed edi
torial after the recent elec
tion on repeal.
Latest word coming from the
City dads is to the effect that all
(Continued on back page)
f ' i ———
WORK TO
START IN
JANUARY
Mayor And County Commis
sioner Return From Confab;
At State Capital
County Commissioner W. F.
Joyner, and Mayor Kelly Jenkins
returned late this afternoon from
a conference in Raleigh with E.
B. Jeffries, chairman of the State
Highway Commission with the as
surance of two important pro
jects -for Roanoke Rapids, Halifax,
Northampton and surrounding
bounties.
First: The appropriation has
been made and slated for paving
Roanoke Avenue within the city
limits. Engineers will arrive here
shortly making preliminary sur
veys and estimated specifications
for the work, and the actual con
tract will be let early in Decem
ber. Work should definitely start
on this project soon after the first
of the year.
Second: The road leading from
Camp’s Store, in Northampton
County, to the Virginia line, en
route to Lawrenceville, will be
hard surfaced. Construction on
this project will start immediat
ely, and it will be an oil-treated
road, similar to the Roanoke Rap
ids-Littleton highway.
Chairman Jeffries stated that
the latter project had been approv
ed by the State Highway Commis
sion, and today sent the necessary
papers to Mrs. Thomas O’Berry,
(Continued on back page)
CITY IS
SCENE OF
JR. MEET
Roanoke Rapids was the scene
of the District Convention, attend
ed by visitors and delegates from
nine councils of the J. O. U. A. M.
“Junior Order” last Friday after
noon and night.
The meeting was divided into
three sessions, including a big
supper to which the public was in
vited.
At the afternoon session, busi
ness matters of the district, (No.
23 of the state) were attended to,
(Continued on back page)
Opposing Leaders in Farm Relief Controversies
On the left is Edward A. O'Neil, .President of the American Farm
Bureau Federation, who announces the federation’s support of President
Boosevelt’s Agricultural Adjustment Act plans and opposing farm strikes.
At the right is Milo Reno, of Iowa, Farm Holiday President, who rejects
all federal plans and proposals, urging continued strikes.
MATTHEWS
BACK IN
HALIFAX
Deputy Sheriff Gray Reports
Uneventful Trip Here
From California
E. A. Matthews, Roanoke Rapids
attorney charged with embezzle
ment, who disappeared from here
six years ago and was arrested in
Honolulu last month, is back in
Halifax County tonight, and is be
ing held in the county jail to a
wait trial.
Deputy sheriff G. F. Gray, sent
to Los Angeles to accompany Mat
thews back to Halifax County,
(Continued on back page)
FINISH
SEWER
SYSTEM
The sewer system has been com
pleted and connections for both
water and sewer may be made as
soon as property owners can ar
range to have one of the local
plumbers do it.
Now that the entire system is
complete, everyone is urged to
have connections made as soon as
possible, in order that the sj^stem
may be operated at maximum ef
ficiency.
There has beeit eonsiderable dis
continued on back page)
HEARING
SET FOR
SLAYER
City’s Razor Murderer To Get
Preliminary Hearing
Tomorrow
Wilmer Gurganus, youthful
slayer, is being held in the Halifax
County jail without bend to an
swer to a charge of first-degree
murder in connection with the
death last Thursday night of Joe
R. Jones, 59-year-old resident of
89 Jackson St., this city. Prelim
inary hearing will be given the
youth tomorrow before Mayor
(Continued on back page)
APPOINTS
GREGORY
AS CLERK
Quentin Gregory, of Halifax,
was appointed Clerk of the Sup
erior Court of Halifax to fill the
vacancy caused by the death of
E. L. Travis, Jr.
The appointment was made
Saturday by Judge R. Hunt Par
ker, after a public hearing from
all aspirants.
Mr. Gregory, who ran a close
second in the primary won by
Mr. Travis, had the backing of a
majority of the bar and of the pre
(Continued on back page)
CHARLIE
FAYED IS
INJURED
Victim Of Eve Iniury While
On Hunting Excursion
Still Unconscious
It has been more than 24
hours now since Charlie Fay
ed, 4f>-year-old employee of a
local grocery store was
brought to the hospital here
with his right eye almost
gouged out, and several
wounds caused by blows on
his skull, evidently the vic
tim of a mysterious injury
while on a lone hunting ex
cursion. Fayed is still unconsci
ous, or at least, not rational e
nough to give a plausible expla
nation for his injuries.
Fayed has been taken to his
home here, after emergency first
aid treatment was administered
at Roanoke Rapids Hospital. He
is resting well, according to the
family, but speaks vaguely of his
accident, if it was an accident,
and of his injuries. It is thought
he will possibly lose the sight of
his right eye, and there are sev
eral abrasions on his head, mute
evidence to the fact that he was
possibly hit by a blunt instru
ment, and very likely the victim
of foul play.
According to Tucker Fayed,
cousin of the wounded man, and
proprietor of a grocery store near
Roanoke Junction where Charlie
Fayed is employed, he left Wed
nesday morning on his weekly
hunting trip, and was expected
to return to the store before noon.
As the hours went on, Tucker
could not account for his not re
turning, but thought he doubtless
was meeting with better luck than
usual, and would be back shortly.
But when Fayed returned, he was
brought back in an ambulance,
shortly after 4 o’clock Wednes
day afternoon.
What intervened is still unknown.
W. W. Jones, of this city, re
turning from a hunting trip, found
the small “pick-up” delivery truck
Fayed was driving, in a four-foot
ditch on the old Garysburg-Weldon
road. Fayed was injured and an.
ambulance was called.
The shot gun Fayed carried was
in the car. In the back was a wild
turkey he had evidently killed. The
car was in second gear, with the
switch key turned on, leading ob
servers to believe that the motor
had stalled, and that Fayed had
met his injuries at another point;
climbed into the truck in an ef
(Continued on back page)
Officers Recover Box Car Shirt Case Loot
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