North Carolina Newspapers

    2 ■ november 2002
ncssm I the stentorian
Critics give “Bone
Chiller” a rating of
"YES"
Austin Luton
-t... It... It's...Yes..."
That's what Daniel
.Silverman said about
the fall play, Bone Chiller, at
rehearsal on Sunday. I was a
bit confused after talking to
Daniel, so I asked Director
Megan Stegall what the play
was about.
Megan: "Yes"
Austin: blinks>
Thoroughly confused,
disturbed, and now rather
afraid for my sanity, I sat
down to watch one of the
rehearsals. It was the cast's
first rehearsal without scripts,
but everything went smoothly
thanks to the hard work of the
cast and directors.
The plot centers around a
group of people from various
backgrounds and relations
who are attempting to deci
pher the will of a dead, rich,
old guy.
The will is a puzzle that
explains how to inherit his
fortime and also gives insight
into the "piece-ful" nature of
his death. I was quickly
drawn in as I tried to solve the
puzzle before the characters
did.
The inclusion of murder
and foul play, with a charm
ingly morbid element of
intrigue, was offset by the
fast-paced, punny dialogue.
Mysteries are one of my
favorite forms of drama, but I
don't think that I've ever seen
a mystery that engaged me in
so many different ways. If
you enjoy puzzles, humor, or
are tired of doing physics, be
sure to go see Bone Chiller
Nov 8, 9, 10, 15, and 16.
Austin Luton
Anna Goldstein and Megan Stegall, directors of the fall play, sit
absorbed in a practice with Robin Magee, the drama coordinator.
GreenPower
Continued from
Front Page
Power, the average home in
North Carolina uses 1,000
kilowatt-hours each month.
The fee will be paid to the
participating utilities who will
then give the revenue directly
to Advanced Energy, a non
profit organization run by the
NC Utilities Commission.
Advanced Energy will use this
money to support develop
ment of the new cleaner (but
more expensive) technologies.
The GreenPower plan was
released on May 31, 2002 and
is expected to be approved
and go into effect in January
2003. Other programs of inter
est for North Carolina's ener
gy policy are public benefit
funds, portfolio standards, and
net metering.
Student groups on univer
sity campuses have succeeded
in purchasing, sometimes
even generating, their own
renewable energy. The
University of Colorado at
Boulder increased their stu
dent fees by one dollar per
semester so that they could
build a wind turbine.
Wesleyan College raised
money to purchase over ten
percent of their energy from
renewable sources. Other
schools have applied for
grants or encouraged energy
conservation in order to buy
green energy.
The message of the move
towards sustainable energy is
this: activists and politicians
have to breathe the same air. If
these groups can cooperate
and work towards a common
goal, there may come a time
when human development and
environmental protection are
not opposing forces.
AIMing for better chat
options
Albert Ren
F or many NCSSM stu
dents, instant messaging
has become an integral
part of life.
Many of us
have not yet
explored all the
instant mes
saging world
has to offer.
The de facto
standard is the
AOL Instant
Messenger (AIM) network,
with over 100 million people
worldwide signed up, includ
ing most of NCSSM. This
review will take a look at the
various choices for AIM
clients.
First up is the official
AIM client, now at version 5.0
(http://www.aim.com). The
new feature touted by AOL in
this version is "AIM
Expressions,” otherwise
known as themes. Examples
include "Patriotic" and shame
less plugs for various movies,
as well as the default AIM
theme. The best new feature
is probably a minor one: a
message-typing indicator,
similar to the one seen in
MSN Messenger.
Unfortunately, this feature
only works if your buddy is
using AIM 5.0 too.
|^?Uian's claim to
feme is that it con
nects to AIM, ICQ,
MSN, and Yahoo all
at once, in one
application."
Probably the second-most
popular AIM client is Trillian
(http://www.trillian.cc), avail
able for free as version 0.74.
Trillian's claim to fame is that
it connects to
AIM, ICQ,
MSN, and
Yahoo all at
once, in one
application.
The function
ality is essen
tially the
same as if you
were using the official clients
from all the companies, so you
don't gain much for getting the
combination. The downside is
that Trillian coimects to the
AOL servers without AOL's
consent and AOL occasionally
blocks Trillian from coimect-
ing, although Trillian is usual
ly quick to fix this.
Netscape 7.0 comes with
a customized version of AIM,
which includes all the usual
AIM features normally foimd.
The twist is that AIM is inte
grated into the browser to
show up in the sidebar, so you
can keep an eye on your
buddy list whenever you
browse the Internet. It also
integrates into the mail pro
gram, allowing you to know if
a person who has sent you an
e-mail is online and available
to chat.
Gaim (http://gaim.source-
forge.net) is an AIM client
with its roots in Unix/Linux,
and it shows. Gaim is able to
connect to MSN and other
networks using plug-ins spe
cific to Linux. Interesting fea
tures include "buddy pounce,"
which is a bit like an enhanced
version of the AIM Alert. For
instance, you can play a
sound, start a program, or
send a specific message to a
specific person if he comes
back from idle or away, or
even signs on. The Windows
version is labeled as alpha-
quality, which means it is not
considered to be very stable or
full-featured and is run at your
own risk.
Mac OS X 10.2 users
have another option not avail
able to anyone else: iChat.
iChat is an authorized AIM
client, so it was developed
with AOL. The interface is
stylized to work well with OS
X's interface. Chat messages
show up as bubbles, and the
buddy list is color-coded. A
new feature called
Rendezvous lets you see other
iChat clients on the local net
work.
With all these options for
instant messaging clients,
your best bet is to try out some
of them and get a feel for what
works well for you.
The Physics department:
Physucks or Physrocks?
Erin McDonald, Bryan
Butler, and Vanessa
Barnett-Loro
T he Physics department
has always been
known for its oddities
on the Science and Math cam
pus. A law unto itself, the
department creates and
enforces its own rules.
Everyone knows about
the honesty policy - after all,
it is plastered on every test.
For those of you have never
been exposed to the lengthy,
hernia-inducing pledge, its
basic message is that if any
one breathes a word about a
physics test - even to someone
who has already taken it -
some sort of vengeful physics
goony is going to spring (with
constant acceleration) out of
the woodwork and stuff recy
cled PFM mystery meat down
your throat imtil you beg for
mercy.
Another oddity is the
infamous 5:00 deadline for
graded Physics assignments.
Many students, such as
Charlie Stone, find this policy
annoying: "In the wee hours
of the morning, it gives you
the false hope you can finish
it the next day. Then at 4:57,
you realize you can't, and
your hope is crushed. You
really need to do it early."
Sure, the mad chaos of
the 4:59 stampede up the
Bryan
stairs/eleva
tor has
resulted in
the occa
sional lost
limb, but for
some last
minute stu
dents, the
adrenaline rush is a natural
high unparalleled by any
other departmental experi
ence.
Finally, the Physics grad
ing scales are amazingly
benevolent. For Physics with
Topics students, 83 and up is
an A, 70 and up a B, and 60
and up, a C. In any other
class, the sight of a 63 on a
test would cause cardiac
arrest, but in Physics, this
number grade translates into a
friendly "C" - bringing to
mind chocolate, cuddles, and
Care-bears. Parents who
might otherwise have zapped
your Cosmic spending money
instead applaud your glorious
achievement in the pursuit of
Physics
scholar
ship.
S o
whether
you adore
or abhor
the policies
of the
Physics
department, you have to
admit: the Physics experience
will include numerous ups
and downs, pushes and pulls,
sines, cosines, and tangents.
Speaking of tangents...may
the force be with you.
the mad chaos
of the 4:59 stampede
up the Bryan
stairs/elevator has
resulted in the occa
sional lost limb..." J
    

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