North Carolina Newspapers

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‘llIGli” blPE, OCTOBER Mth, 1921
Page Tiii-ee
1
RACQUET CLUB STARTS
ELIMINATION ROUNDS
With I'jys and girls signed
nj) for the tennis tournament between the
four high school classes, a pennant-win
ning team is expected to appear before the
final elimination rounds are played, stated
M”. W. E. Giles, faculty manager, in an in
terview yesterday.
James Wilkins has been elected presi
dent of the Tennis Association, with Har
old Sebum as manager of the boys and
Doris Stinnett, as manager of the girls, as
sisting him.
Some of the matches have already been
played and the final rounds are expected
to be played in a few weeks. Harold Se
bum, James Wilkins, Hubert Rawlins,
Charles Causey, have sliown uj) well in the
preliminary matches for the boys. Doris
Stinnett and Elizabeth Simpson look like
final round material for the girls.
A tennis racquet will be presented to
each of the winners in the final rounds.
Erom the winners in the boys’ tournament,
file team to represent C. H. S. in the spring
it Chapel Hill will be picked. Besides this
several matches will be arranged with other
high schools in the near vicinity.
DOUGLAS AND EARNHARDT
TALK IN CHAPEL MONDAY
The Chapel exercise last Monday was a
double treat. We had Mr. R. D. Douglas
to give us a talk on Eire Prevention and
Dr. Barnhardt to give us an account of
his trip to Europe.
Mr. Douglas, who has been a member of
the Greensboro Eire Department for twen
ty-five years, gave us some of the best
methods for fire ]U'evcntion, impressing
upon us our individual responsibility. He
stated that it was as much the fire depart
ment’s business to prevent fires as to fight
them after they are started. Some of tlie
U. S. statistics regarding loss of life and
property were, given us to understand the
big problem of fire prevention.
Dr. Bai'iihardt, wlio has just returned
from a ninety-day trip to Europe, gave an
interesting account of existing conditions
in Europe today, which as lie could see
them were not very bright.
Visiting the gi'aves and monuments of
great European figures, he came across
several graves of note, to-wit, that of
Caesar and of Virgil. He thought that it
would be of interest to all of tlie students
to know tliat they were resting easily and
that he thouglit that thcj’e was a great im
probability of their writing furtlior books.-
SENIOR GIRLS ENTERTAIN
FOOTBALL TEAM AT ‘‘Y” HUT
Saturday night at the Hut the
Senior girls were hostess to the Greensboro
and D. M. I. football teams. When the
boys and girls arrived they found the hut
all lighted up. and a fire blazing in the
large fireplace. The reception committee,
Mildred Morrison, Gladys Holland and
iSkinnie Wynne met tlie guests at the door
and collected a dime from each couple. The
'fun began at once when cards were given
out wi1h blanks for names, ages and opin
ions. In trying to get all this information
the boys and girls got better acquainted.
Emelia Sternberger’s card which had the
most names was r(;ad. T’he greatest ex
citement and amusement, however, was
furnished by the football games carried on
at several tables. This game is played by
blowing an egg shell over the table and try
ing to blow it off the other side. The side
that succeeds scores a touch-down. When
everyone had bh/wn themselves red in the
face the crowd formed a big circle and
passed everything in the hut from a button
to a chair. Wlien the whistle blows tlie ar
ticles are started the other way. If you
drop anything you get out of the game.
This was broken u]) by the call to come and
get the eats which wei-e served in cafeteria
style. The eats were hot chocolate and
sandwiches. Tlie girls in charge of this
part were: Nellie Irvin, Margaret Smith
and Peggy Pickard. Tlie boys enjoyed this
part of the evening especially. Miss Tyre
and Miss Killingsworth managed the com
mittees and helped make the fun go. Mr.
Philips, Mr. Purrington and Mr. Giles
managed the games and saw to it that ev
erybody had a good time.
The party broke up at ten because the
D. M. I. boys had to catch their train.
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS VISIT
EUROPE. DR. LINDEMAN INTER
PRETS EXISTING CONDITIONS.
On Monday at CTiapel period the high
school students traveled thi'ough Europe
and viewed the economic and social Euro
pean conditions through the eyes of Dr.
Ihndeman of the faculty of the North
Carolina College for Women. They saw
vividly what Dr. Liiideman has seen for
the past three months in his travels—an al
most hopeless Europe. Although the view
was so dark, yet it was as he said ‘ ‘ Eoolish
to stick your head, as an ostrich does, be
neath the sand, and believe yourself free
from existing danger.”
I)r. Lindenian gave as a cause for a great
deal of these hopeless conditions, the fact
that the United Slates had refused to enter
the League of Nations, weak and trouble-
making as some of its features arc. A great
deal of tlie misery aiid uncertainty existing
in Europe today, in his opinion, formed
after an examinalion of the methods of the
Xjeague in Geneva, showing where plan aft
er plan for relief in financial conditions
had failed because of the refusal of the
United States to agree to them, would have
been alleviated if the United States had
been a member of (hat League.
He described Austria as desperate, starv
ing to death, with no liope for the future,
due primarily to the failure of the plans
to relieve her financial distress. The
Quakers’ or Eriends’ fine work here, had
saved the children, undersized as they now
are, from absolute starvation. The present
Austrian nation can last no longer than
six months—and beyond that—^nobody
knows. The suggested plan to join with
Germany is a failure because Germany
does not desire it and Erance will not con
sent to it; the other suggested solution to
her present difficulties, that of combining
with Bavaria also fails because of econom
ic reasons.
In Germany the conditions arc very un
settled. No one knows when the Monarch
ists will overthrow the present government.
Germany cannot come into world promi
nence again, until they are willing to admit
their wrong in violating the neutrality of
Belgium. Now, even the laboring class
which makes up the new college group of
people, claim they cati justify Germany’s
stand.
Tlie Sinn Fein movement, not the labor,
or woman suffrage movement, is the dis
turbing question. Dr. Lindenian told how
he was arrested as a Sinn Einer, because
he was learning Sinn Fein songs from two
Irishmen, and how it took several liours
j)resenting his credentials from the biggest
men in America to the most prominent in
Europe, before he was released.
All over Europe, and especially in
France, Americans are looked on with ex
treme contempt and dislike, and every
thing American is hated. This attitude is
caused mostly by disgust for the American
speculators in Europe, who are hogging up
millions of dollars on the unsettled finan
cial conditions. Only in Czecho-Slavokia
does America have any influence. Wilson
is a hero in their eyes, and as such they
hang his picture along with John Huss,
and President Mosaeyk. C'Zecho-Slavakia
offers the most optimistic view of any oth
er country of Europe for two reasons—her
president and her wonderful resources.
Even her future is unsettled if she does
bind together her many different races.
Jugo-Slavia’s future is also bright.
The period was over before the trip over
Europe was finished. However, Dr. Linde-
man has promised to come back again, and
show the conditions in the other countries
of Europe. The students are looking for
ward to seeing him again, especially be
cause he has promised to observe conditions
in a little more optimistic light.
PLEASE, DEAR!
In the gloaming, oh, my darling.
When the lights are dim and low,
That your face is powdered, painted,
How am I, sweetlieart, to know?
Twice this month I’ve had to bundle
Every coat tliat 1 possess
To the cleaners—won’t you darling,
Love me more, aiid powder less?
1 The New Records
i Are Out!
These snappy, cateny,
swinging dance hits just won’t
let your feet behave—stop at
our shop and hear these w'on-
derful Brunswick Super-Fea
ture Records today.
The Brunswick artists know
how to put thrills in dance
music. Then, The Brunswick
Phonograpli plays them right.
Sprinkle Piano
Co.
115 East Market Street
Open Evenings
FOR ALL COLD TROUBLES
X/ICKS
W VapoRub
THE
CAROLINA QUEEN CAST IRON RANGE
Made of Best Material—Fully Guaranteed
Sold by HARDWARE and FURNITURE DEALERS
Manufactured by
GLASCOCK STOVE & MFG. CO.
GREENSBORO, N. C.
The “sure” in insurance takes the “if” out of life and puts “heal” in health.
INSURE WITH
THE SOUTHERN LIFE AND TRUST CO.
GREENSBORO, N. C.
A. W. McAlister, President; R. G. Vbiuglin, 1st Vice-Pi'('sideiit; A. M. Sciiles,
2nd Vice-Pre.sideiit and Agency Maiuiger; AiUiiir Watt, Secreati-y.
RUCKER & COMPANY
COTTON
New York Cotton Exchange New Orleans Cotton Exchange
RUCKER WAREHOUSE CORPORATION
Storage of Cotton
1.
I
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