North Carolina Newspapers

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VOL. 2.
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL DECEMBER 16, 1921
No. 9
NELLIE IRVIN ELECTED
PRESIDENT DE DRAMATIC
CLDB AT MONDAY MEETING
OVER EORTY STDDENTS VISIT
LIBRARY EVERY PERIOD IN DAY
MEAN BOLL DOGS CHEW DP
TODGH WILD CAT BUNCH
SS. SNOW COLOR EXPERT
TALKS IN CHAPEL PERIOD
Study of Life and Works of Isben
Begun at First Regular Meeting
Last Monday night the senior class
headed by Nellie Irvin, who was
elected president, organized a drama
tic club at the Greensboro High
School.
The purpose of this club is two
fold. First, to enable the members
to become better acquainted with the
best writers and dramatist, and, to
develop their ability to speak in pub
lic. A call meeting of the club was
held Wednesday, November 30, after
school, for the purpose of seeing how
many were interested in this move'
ment, to organize and to elect officers.
About thirty seniors were present,
and the following officers were elec
ted: President, Nellie Irvin; Vice-
President, Edwin Pearce; Secretary,
Katherine Grantham; Treasurer, Wil
bur Sharpe; Press Reporter, Martha
Cox.
The club will be under the super-
■ vision of Miss Dorse of the English
Department of the High School, and
Mr. Blythe of the Lindsay St. School.
A committee was appointed to draw
up a constitution for the club, and
another appointed to prepare pro-
' grams for the regular meetings.
The first regular meeting was held
Monday night in the High School
auditorium at 7 o’clock. At this
• meeting were studied the life and
works of the Norwegian dramatist,
Isben.
The following program was ren
dered:
Talkette—The Life of Isben—
Mary Anderson.
Paper—The Place of Isben Among
Modern Play writers.—Ruth Under
wood.
The Story of the Doll Flouse Re
told—Carlotta Barnes.
The Closing Scene of the Doll
House—James Wilkins and Frances
Harrison.
One Act Comedy—Hubert Rawlins
and Lucile Wynne.
Mr. Blythe favored us by reading
an original short comedy on College
Life.
Indications are that this club has
a bright future and will mean much
tO' the school.
The Library is very essential in
every high school student’s life.
About forty pupils visit the Library
every period for parallel work.
There are also fifty or more books
issued from the Library daily.
New books lately received are the
j following: “Jean Mitchell School,”
by Angelina W. Wray; forty “Junior
, Laurel Songs” books, by Tereasa
i Armitage. “The Frog Book, by Mary
i C. Dickerson, “Nature’s Garden,”
I by Neltje Blanchan. and “The Insect
Book,” by Dr. Leland Howard, were
presented by Miss Flossie Stout’s
: eighth grade Sc.ence class.
; Mrs. E. Slernberger 'presented
■ books to the i erson in each grade
I writing the best essay on “Health.”
i Ihese in turn were presented to the
; Library, “Theodore Roosevelt,” by
j Wiliam R. Thayer, won by Myrtle
. Ellen LaBarr eleventh'. grade;
j three volumes “Collected Poems,”
j by Alfred Noyes, won by Marjorie
I Cartland, tenth grade; “Kipling’s
Verses,” won by Elizabeth Thornton,
ninth grade, and “Handbook of
Nature Study,” by Anna B. Com-
! stock won by Elizabeth Stone, eight
grade.
! Different classes are giving yearly
I subscriptions to the “American Mag
azine” “North American Review.”
“New York Times,”(Sun), “Outlook,”
“High School Journal,” 'f‘World’s
, Work,” “Review of \ Reviews,”
' “Survey,;” Current Opinion,” and
; “Popular Mechanics.”
“L ’13’s” STAGE BIG HUNT
YOUNG TROUBADOURS, MINUS
HARPS, WALK EROM HIGH POINT
Max and William Carry Out Promise
to Foot the Miles to Greensboro
During the Thanksgiving ftete-
tivities, hailing back to the days of
our Pilgrim Fathers, two very high-
spirited and ambitious young warf-
derers started from the distant vill
age of High Point to Greensboro—
one of the South’s largest and most
progressive cities. The cause of
their perambulatious was due to
a hasty call on Dame Luck. How
ever, fate frowned on these wag-
erers and young Max and William
started on their weary promenade
of many weary miles back home.
After “trodding” many miles and
treading many blisters on their toes
a speck of civilization loomed upon
the horizon, which proved to be the
metropolis of Jamestown, nation
ally known for its annual horse-shoe
tournament which attracts some of
the best of the countryside.
These tired and weary pedestrians
sojourned just long enough to catch
a draught of Si. Perkin’s famous
Sody-Pop, and again resumed their
tireless journey, reaching their des
tination in the wee small hours of
the night.
On Wedensday night, November,
the twenty-third, the “L ’13’s” with
a group of their friends met at
Elizabeth Chetty’s about eight
o’clock, for the purpose of going
on a ’possum hunt. Everybody was
in good spirits and ready to catch
a dozen ’possums.
A little after eight o'clock the
crowd left Elizabeth’s in three cars.
(Here I must not neglect to state
that two dogs and a negro guide
“Alex” accompanied them) They took
the Battle Ground Road and rode
out about three miles beyond. Fi
nally, they stopped at a cabin to get
j a few articles and to leave the
j cars, as they had to do the hunt
ing by walking.
I Then, the fun began. They turned
I the dogs loose and waited a few
moments, then set out. The only
means of light was by one lantern
and that was not enough for thirty
people. Therefore they were hit
in the face by limbs of small
trees, caught in briar bushes, and one
or two had the bad luck to step
in a puddle of water. After tramp
ing about two or three miles and
not accomplishing anything, the
crowd decided they had better go
back to the cars and get something i
to eat. ;
(By-the-way, the negro guide was :
most disheartening ;n saying, that '
the crowd was entirely too large
and too gay, for trailing a ’pos- i
sum). !
With this in mind, the crowd |
hiked back to the cars. Here, they j
built a large bon-fire and cooked ■
v/einies and toasted marshmallows. I
As it was getting along toward
morning, the chaperones said the i
crowd would have to go home and
go ’possum-hunting again. This
the crowd agreed to do and firmly ,
declared they ovould try the hunt
again with better success, but they
all had floods of fun.
“HIGH LIFE.”
Miss Gully: (In Latin Class).
Dahlia translate the next sentence.
Dahlia S: Do you mind if I look up
some words?
On the afternoon of Wednesday.
Nov. 22nd, beautifully clad grid-
ironers stepped into the great arena
in the White Oak vicinity. One of the
teams was headed hy the “wild-eyed”
“Jody” Transou, and he called his
mates Wild Cats for some reason un
known to the public or to any of our
highly representative audience. The
other eleven followed the thin-head
ed Bunny J:larker, who was trying to
satisfy his star, Baby Daniel, who
was suffering very much with an in
growing heel, by a small piece of
I stick candy which could have been
I used very well as a column for our
i school building. Little Daniel was
I followed by “Slick Eyed” Hinkle
j with his bobbed haired supporters
j from Bull Pen.
i The two teams ran a few signals
I after much fussing over who should
I play quarterback and soon stated they
were ready to get at each other. Col
legiate Purrington acted as dispute
settler (also called referee in some
struggles) and tooted his jews harp
as a signal to start. Mr. Daniels
kicked off for the Bulldogs and Wil
lie Green of the Wild Cats received
I it and made a three yard dash before
a necking party spilled him. Little
McIntosh tried a few end gallops and
Transou seemed to amuse himself
with running to the line and hitting
j his men in the back with his head.
I The spheriod moved up and down
; the field all during the first half with
, the fierce Bulldogs keeping the ball
I most of the time. Just as the whistle
I blew the large crowd simply surged
; upon the grounds. The supporters
seemed to have the spirit of the aw
ful struggle and were yelling with
a\vful force. When the noise had sub
sided ard the audience from Elon
had come from the field, “Slick Eye”
was found lying upon his back with
a black eye. Some say' that Lily
Green had hit him for not crossing tin
desired lime line. But the Bull Pen
supporters claimed that “Hink” had
swallowed his “Climax” when cut
out bv the overgrown “Jedge” A.dams
I (the star defensive line man of the
I Wild Wild Cats).
j The second half started with Mc-
! Iiitosh kicking for the Cats and after
the fracas was over Willie Cooper
was found to have the ball in his pos
session on the forty yard line. Aftei
running three times without gaining
much, Daniels broke away and ran
thirty yards before being overtaken
by the fleet-footed Clements. Daniels
was then run for eight times, and the
last time he hit the line as a thun
derbolt, cut a handspring and landed
on the other side of the line. He then
booted the ball between the twin
willows for one more point. Score,
Bulldogs 7; Wild Cats 0.
The Wild Cats chose to receive and
Green caught Daniel’s kick on the
thirty yard line. Green, the unsur
passed tracked man of the Spring St.
Academy for Industrious Young Gen-'
llemen, saw two men coming at him |
from each side. He did not see how!
he could stiff arm both so he threw
the ball into the air, stiff-armed both
men, caught the ball and ran on only
to be overtaken by the sandy-haired
Beef Sanders. Transou then called a
pass. He threw a pass to Bell who
grabbed it as a thunderbolt from mid
air and limped across the goal line.
There was much rejoicing amid the
players, but the spectators were so
engaged in watching a fist fight be
tween Jimmy McAlister and S^enator
Edwin Hale that they knew not wlir.t
had happened. McIntosh then tried
to kick goal but because of the dark- !
ness he missed it by one ninety-
ninth of an inch, and the Cats went
down under the Dogs to the tu ;e of
7-6.
Daniels, Cooper and Georg'^ Tay
lor did exceptionally good work for
thunderbolt work of Transou to Bell
featured the Fur animal side.
Dealt With Harmonizing of Colors
In Clothes.
The school was entertained Wed.,
Dec. 7th, in Chapel by Miss Snow,
an artist who knows more, probably,
tlian anybody else in the U. S.
about the co-ordination of colors.
Miss Snow’s purpose in the lecture
was to help the students to better
harmonize the various colors in their
clothes and to produce better color
schemes or effects in common dec
oration and dressing. She produced
some wonderful effects by bringing
together on a screen various colors
and their compliments in the form
of long silk draperies. She showed
the school the three primary colors
and demonstrated by means of her
draperies how other colors and their
compliments might be produced.
The lecture was of much practical
value to the whole school in that
it gave the students a working
knowledge of how to obtain the
best results from combining the
proper colors in their everyday at
tire.
INDIVIDUAL REPURT GIVES
ALL CHARACTERISTICS OF
EACH FOOTBALL WARRIOR
HIGH SCHOOL LINE-UP SHOULD
CONTAIN SEVERAL ALL
STATE MEN,
ROOM 4-B ELECTS OFFICERS
GIVES AN INTERESTING PLAY
, The session room 4-B has orga-
j nized and elected officers as follows:
I President, Julia King; Vice President,
I Mattie Ruth; Secretary and Treasurer
Virginia Bain; Critic. Annie Dalton.
I Tuesday at the Chapel Period they
I gave a very interesting play which
j they had worked up without any
j assistance. Room 4 had as their
[ guests room 2-B.
j The play was entitled “The Cou^n-
[ try C ousins.” Cast of characters
i included
City Cousin
Miss Norman Nelda Cox
Her Friends
Miss Kate Hale Virginia Bain
Miss Marjorie Perkins .Marion Lewis
Miss Virginia Dare..Millie Patterson
Country Cousins
Susie Saucebox Julia King
Sallie Saucebox Maude Fulton-
Mollie Saucebox... .Bertha Walden
A.sia Saucebox Nada Sanford
The Maid Lillie May Jones
The play was very comical in
parts, the actors receiving a great
deal of applause.
MISS STREETER TALKS IN
CHAPEL
Monday, Dec. 5.—Miss Streeter,
employed by the Victor Company,
gave us a very interesting talk in
Chapel on “Music Appreciation” and
“How to Listen to Music.” She said
that Music was composed of rythm,
harmony, melody and form. She
played several selections on the
Victrola to illustrate these different
types. She said that what we term
“popular music” is really only little
more than the rhymth that the sav
ages had. She wants us all to learn
to appreciate a high class of music.
The 1921 football season of G. H.
S. has ended. Although it wound up
with a stinging 'defeat, the entire
school feels that the team as a whole
did very good work. Coach Raben-
horst had many big holes to fill up
but fortunately he found ready mate
rial.
* * *
CLYDE HENDERSON, Right End.
Henderson is in every play. He is
continually breaking into the oppos
ing backfield and messing up their
plays. Clyde is one of the best tackles
in the state and he fights to the final
whistle.
+ jf *
“BUNNY”BARKER
“Bunion” is the old reliable. Very
few if any get by him, and when he
is called for over right tackle, you
can always see “Bunny’s” hefty form
clearing the way.
* * *
“VARSITY” FORSYTHE, Right G.
“Varse” is a tower of strength in
the line. He is in every minute of
play and when the opposing team has
backed old G. H. S. up to her door,
“Varsity” can always be depended on
to give the best in him to hold that
GEORGE TAYLOR, Center.
He is our “fightin’ cap’n.” George
is the pep injector of the team. He is
in the game every second &nd is al
ways spurring his men on and on.
When an opposing play is directed
toward center, its goose is cooked,
for that part of the line is, literally
speaking, a brick wall.
“WILLIE” GREEN, Left Guard.
Rain or shine, snow or blow,
“Buck” can always be found hold
ing down his position with that dog
ged, goodnatured determination that
characterizes everything he does.
The position to the left of center
could be filled no better.
» « *
“JODY” TRANSOU, Left Tackle.
Joseph is without a doubt the best
tackle in the state. When an enemy
(Continued on page 4)
MIS WIN fIBST GAME
IN FOOTBJia TOyHNAMENT
Freshman Team Looks Good for
All-Class Championship
Gridiron Honors
CLASS BASKETBALL FOR
GIRLS IS IN FULL SWING
Seniors Defeat Freshmen to the
Tune of 39 to 10'
Class basketball is in full swing
with every court occupied every
afternoon. Each class is scheduled
to play the others and the two
cla.sses making the highest percent
age play off their fiinal game next
Tuesday evening at the Y. M. C. A.
—The preliminaries started Monday
afternoon with the Seniors defeat
ing the Freshmen by 39 to 10.
The Varsity Team will begin work
immediately after Christmas since
many games are scheduled for the
season.
The inter-class football tourna
ment of Greensboro High School has
begun; the junior class getting off
on a flying start by defeating the
seniors in the first game at Cone
Pai’k last Friday aftezmoon.
Tuesday afternoon at Cone Park
the Sophs and Freshies play the
in a second game of the series. The
winner of this contest play the
Juniors Friday at Cone Park for the
school pennant.
The dope is rather hard to handle
due to the scarcity of games played.
However, after careful observation
of the clubs in practice the odds
seem to be in favor of the freshies
in both of the remaining games.
Clyde Henderson an experienced man
on the vai-sity end has succeeded in
tuning out a very good machine.
They will nevertheless face a hard
fighting detennined aggregation
when they meet Coach Jody Tran-
sou’s Junior Goats.
The Soph’s eleven, although it is
up to this time an unknown quan
tity, should put up a stiff fight under
the rigorous handling of Coach Tay
lor.
    

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