North Carolina Newspapers

    STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
STANDS FOR
High Life
From the Gate City of the South and the Birth Place of O. Henry
fit-
HONOR, LOYALTY,
SCHOLARSHIP,
COOPERATION
VOLUME VI
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL, GREENSBORO, N. C., OCTOBER 23, 1925
NUMBER 3
Purpose of the Council
Is Key Note of Program
MEMBERS SPEAK
Honor, Loyalty, Scholastic At
tainment and Co-operation
Stressed by Speakers.
P. B. WHITTINGTON PRESIDES
Honor, loyalty, scholastic attainment,
and co-operation were the things asked
from every student by the members of
the Student Council in the series of
Chapel programs they conducted Octo
ber 12, 13, and 14, at the chapel assem
blies.
P. B. Whittington, President of the
Council, told of the formation of the
Student Co-operative Council in March,
1921, and of its purpose as expressed in
the preamble.
The members were then introduced as
follows: Charles Shalfener, Macon Cro
cker, Edwin King, Carlton Wilder,
George Stone, Clarence Scott, Phil
Wicker, Hilda Smith, and John Betts,
representatives from the 8a through the
eighth semesters respectively. Charlotte
Van Noppen, representative from Girl’s
(Continued on page three)
DISTRICT EDUCATIONAL
ASSOCIATION TO HOLD
MEETING AT N. C. C. W.
C. W. Phillips is President of
Grammar Grade Department;
Many Teachers to Attend.
Friday and Saturday, October 30, and
31, the Northwestern District of the
North Carolina Educational Association
will hold it’s annual meeting at N. C.
C. W. Mr. C. W. Phillips, principal
of the Greensboro High School, is presi
dent of the Grammar Grade Department
of the State Association.
Friday, the High School will observe
a holiday so that the teachers may at
tend the meeting. Mr. Gildersleeve is
forming a chorus of local instructors
who will sing at the District sessions.
We have endeavored to prepare a pro
gram that will be worthy of our or-
(Continued, on page three)
MUSICAL SELECTIONS ARE
GIVEN BY WILL LINDSAY
Will Lindsay, once a bootblack on the
streets of Greensboro, entertained the
Juniors and Seniors in Chapel Monday,
October 19. He played several selec
tions on the banjo and harmonica, play
ing them simultaneously. He also re
cited a poem, “Preserverance” written
by a negro boy, and whistled a popular
air, playing his own accompaniment at
the piano.
In a talk made before starting his en
tertainment, the negro expressed his feel
ing toward the white race: “The white
folks have enabled me to make a suc
cess of music that many people say is
very great. I am indebted to the white
man for all I know.” Those present ex
pressed themselves as delighted with the
man, declared that he was a musical
prodigy, and enthusiastically applauded
his efforts.
Mr. Phillips opened the program with
the reciting of the twenty-third psalm
in concert with the entire student body.
Afterwards, he awarded a bronze pin
given by the Underwood Typewriter Co.
to Pauline Medearis for speed and ac
curacy in typing forty words a minute,
and certificates to Ruth Capel for thir
ty-one words a minute, Gladys Bennett
for thirty-two words, Elizabeth Rock
well for thirty-seven, Rachael Nye for
thirty, and Dan Fifer for thirty-two.
THE HONOR ROLL FOR
SEPTEMBER
Amendment to Constitution Brought
Before Student Body and Passed;
New Members Introduced.
Ben Kendrick, P. B. Whittington,
Elizabeth Campbell, Margaret Fergu
son, Frances Johnson, Glenn Boyd
McLeod, Marguerite Mason, Hilda
Smith, Flelen Stockard, Doris Vanne-
man, Annie Younts, Ed. Mendenhall,
Randall Martin, Marshall Campbell,
David Swift, James Tidwell, Helen
Felder, Margaret Hood, Dorothy Lea,
Mary I.yon, Carolyn Simmon, Clyde
Norcom, Lorraine Revels, Henry
Biggs Jr., Charles GralT, Margaret
Hackney, Ruth Lewis, Carlton Wil
der, Dorothy Donnell, Eugenia Isler,
Sadie Sharp, Margaret Britton, Mary
Leigh Causey, Ellen Kelley, Katherine
Nowell, Mary Robinson, Jewell Rain
ey, Betty Turner, James Webb, John
Nau, Ruth Long, Mary Bailey Wil
liams, Doris Stewart, Nell Thurman,
Bob Caveness, Beverly Moore, Ruth
Abbott, Bernice Apple, Betty Brown,
Mary Lynn Carlson, Mary Elizabeth
King, Sara Mendenhall, Phyllis Penn,
Matilda Robinson, Cynthia Vaughn,
Mary Jane Wharton, Myra Wilker-
son, Henry Weiland, Charles Rives,
Elizabeth Boyst, Edna Morgan, Paul
ine Medearis, Annie Cagle, Daphne
Hunt, Leonard Lineberry, Paul
Shurlock.
U. S. NAVY BAND
TO GIVE CONCERTS
Different Program Both Times;
Profits Go to National
Stadium Fund.
The United States Navy Band will
give two programs Saturday, October 24,
at the Grand Theater, under the auspices
of the Civic Clubs of Greensboro. School
children are urged to attend the mati
nee. There will be a different program
each time.
The Navy Band regularly plays on the
Mayflower, the presidential yatch, but is
released for a period each year in which
to tour the country. It is during this
tour that the band will come to Greens
boro.
All profits will go to the National Sta
dium Fund, which is being raised by the
American Legion in memory of the
World War heroes. It has not yet been
decided where the Stadium will be built.
“Safety is the best first aid”, declared
Dr. M. J. Shields, assistant director of
First Aid for the American Red Cross,
in a talk which he gave before the class
es of the main building, Monday, Octo
ber 19, at the fourth period. “Each pu
pil,” he contended, “is a potential safety
engineer. First Aid doesn’t make nurses
out of girls, or quacks out of boys. First
Aid is practical common sense. We are
all under obligation to prevent accidents.
Never pass nails in a board without doing
something to them. Thirty per cent of
the accidents happen in and around the
home.”
John Betts, a High School senior, was
the subject of the demonstration which
Dr. Shields, assisted' by several scouts,
gave. He illustrated the correct and in
correct methods of stopping a flow of
blood in the upper arm by use of a
tourniquet.
“Don’t neglect little cuts and scratches
the speaker urged. “The majority of
blood poisoning is caused by small
wounds.”
Then he demonstrated how to fix tem
porary splints on a broken leg and how
to improvise a stretcher with two poles
and two coats. He showed the “three
Bearers” method of lifting an injured
person when there were no coats handy
(Continued on page three)
SHIELDS DIRECTS
FIRST AID COURSES
AT Y. M. C. A. HUT
Training Offered in Structure
of Body, Bandaging and Other
Forms of First Aid Work.
DR. SHIELDS DISCUSSES
NEEDS OF FIRST AID
^
It is Estimated That Thirty Percent
of the Accidents Happen
at Home.
MAGAZINE WILL APPEAR
OCTOBER 31, SAYS WUNSCH
October 31 is the date set for the ap
pearance of the first issue of “Home-
spun.” Recently many students have
made inquiries concerning the publica
tion. The statement regarding the date
of appearance may be considered au
thoritative, as it was made by W. R.
Wunsch, the faculty director of the mag
azine.
James B. Duke has passed on. The
students of Greensboro High School join
in the profound sorrow felt all over the
nation over the death of the great mul
ti-millionaire, who has done more than
perhaps any other man for higher edu
cation in North Carolina.
SEVENTY - SIX ENROLLED
Students Are Representatives from
Firemen, Police, Schools, Scouts,
and Principal Industries.
-♦
The Frst Aid' Course which began
Monday, 12, under the supervision of
Dr. M. J. Shields, assistant director of
first aid for the American Red Cross, is
being conducted daily at the Y. W. C.
A. hut. This course will continue for
eight days.
There are three classes each day, one
from nine to eleven, one from three to
five and a third from seven thirty to
nine thirty.
The seventy six enrolled for the course
consists of representatives from the fol
lowing: Firemen, Police, Schools, Scouts,
and the principle industries of the city.
The text book being used is “A Red
Cross Abridged Text Book on First
Aid.”
The lessons cover the structure and
mechanics of the body; bandaging; gen
eral directions for giving first aid; the
care of bruises, sprains, dislocations and
fractures; carrying the injured; poison
ing; war first aid; and common emer
gencies.
A registration fee of one dollar is re
quired. This covers the cost of the text
book and the diploma, which is awarded
to all those who make a satisfactory
average on the examination given at the
end of the course.
Among the teachers of the High School
taking this course are: Miss Walker, Miss;
Cooper and Miss Dry.
HIGH SCHOOL P. T. A.
HOLDS DRIVE FOR
MEMBERSHIP DUES
^
Each Room Paying up 100 Per
Cent Dues Gets a Cake at
Chapel Period Friday.
Monday and Tuesday, October 12 and
13, the Parent-Teachers Association of
the High School put across a drive for
membership dues, twenty-five cents a
parent. Each room going 100% was
promised a gallon of ice cream, Friday,
October 16.
There were two purposes in this; one
being to get members, and the other to
raise state dues, which are ten cents
per member. The remaining funds are
appropriated for various things: scho
larship, helping needy students, furnish
ing curtains for the cafeteria, enter
tainments for the association, etc.
Total receipts to date are $48.50.
Rooms 202, 102, 12, 13, B6 and B8 went
100% and received their ice cream at
Chapel period Friday.
NORTH CAROLINA
EDUCATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
Northwestern District
N. C. C. W.
PROGRAM
Friday, October 30, 1 P.M.
1. Address of Welcome—Dr. Julius
1. Foust, President North Carolina
College for Women.
2. “Some Vicious Educational
Myths”—Mr. C. J. Heatwole, Execu
tive Secretary Virginia State Teach
ers Association.
3. “Educational Objectives”—Dr. J.
Henry Highsmith, Supervisor of High
Schools.
4. Appointment of Committees—An
nouncements.
Second General Session
Friday, October 30, 7:30 P.M.
1. Invocation—Rev. G. Ray Jordan,
Pastor College Place Methodist Epis
copal Church.
2. Chorus—High Point Public School
Teachers.
3. Announcements.
4. Chorus—Greensboro Public School
Teachers.
5. Lecture—Recital—Mr. Edwin M.
Steckel.
6. Chorus—Winston-Salem Public
School Teachers.
7. Address—“The Fourth R”—^^Dr.
L. W. Crawford, Department of Re
ligious Education, George Peabody
College, Nashville, Tenn.
8. Chorus—Greensboro, Winston Sa
lem. and High Point Public School
Teachers.
Third General Session
Saturday, October 31, 12 Noon
1. Address—“The Rural Elementary
School”—Mr. A. T. Allen, State Su
perintendent Public Instruction.
2. Announcements.
3. Business Meeting—Election of
Officers.
4. Adjournment.
SENIORS DECIDE TO
HAVE YEAR-BOOK
New Plan Will Cost $1,400 Less
Than the Old Reflector—
Two Copies a Year.
♦
The seniors held a very important
meeting on October 8, at which time
Mr. Phillips put before the class the
question of whether they should have an
annual this year or whether they should
turn the last issue of the magazine into
a senior year book to take the place of
the annual.
Mr. Phillips announced that he was
not denying the seniors the privilege of
having an annual, but that he wanted
them to think about the idea of a cheap
er book with an open mind. If, then,
they still wanted an annual he would be
glad to co-operate with them and help
in every way possible.
Discussion of the question was left
open till a further meeting Friday, Oc
tober 16, at which meeting the vote was
cast giving the year book preference
by 66-56 majority.
Glenn Boyd McCleod, president of the
senior class, presided over the meeting.
Officers were elected: Billy Grubbs, Vice-
President; Weldon Beacham, Secretary;
J arnes Tidwell, Treasurer and Charlotte
Van Noppen, Press Reporter.
BOY SCOUTS TO HOLD
RALLY IN OCTOBER
A Regular, Well-Planned Hallowe’en
Program Has Been Arranged
for the Occasion.
The annual Fall Rally of the Boy
Scouts of this city is planned for Fri
day, October 30. The place where it is
to be held will not be disclosed until
later. Promptly at five o’clock P. M. the
scouts will assemble at the Guilford
Court House and hike to the field of the
rally.
A varied program of activities is ar
ranged for the occasion. Games will be
played and various contests will be held
(Continued on page three)
PARENTS’QUERIES
FULLY ANSWERED
AT P.T.A. MEETING
^
A Round-Table Discussion Was
Carried on to Clear up
Difficulties.
CO-OPERATION IS URGED
Questions Bearing on Credits, Gradu
ating Classes, Lunches and Home
Study Were Brought Out.
A round table discussion of questions
from the parents which were answered
by Miss Mitchell, Dean of Girls, and Mr.
Charlie Phillips, principal, made the Pa
rent-Teachers meeting of October 7th,
very interesting.
Some questions which have been weigh
ing upon the minds of the mothers were
raised, the following being some of the
typical ones:
What credits will be given on the
grade work?
What credits are equired to enter an
A-1 college?
Will there be two graduating classes
each year?
(Continued on page three)
MR. ARCHER AHENDS
THE RECREATIONAL
MEET AT ASHEVILLE
Is the Twelfth Congress of Its
Kind—Many Recreational
Directors Attend.
Superintendent Archer, IT. W. Parks,
physical director of the city schools. Miss
Mary C. Coleman from N. C. C. W.,
Victor Woodward, Paul Findley, T. K.
Roberts, and Mr. Livers represented
Greensboro at the “Twelfth Recreational
Congress” held in Asheville, N. C., from
Monday, October 5th until the 10th. Mr.
Archer stayed only three days but the
rest enjoyed all of the meetings.
The program for the congress was
very interesting and inspirational. Re
creational directors from all over the
country attended. Mr. Victor Brown,
director of South Park Playground in
Chicago, made a speech on “Intra-Mural
Athletics.” Another of the main speak
ers for the meeting was Mr. Paul Find
ley of Greensboro, who talked on “The
Proposed Park and Playground System
in Greensboro”. One of the leading
features of the program was Greens
boro’s demonstration of handicraft, com
posed of: honey suckle basketry, and
sewing.
During the congress Mr. Lee H. Fd-
(Continued on page three)
RUMMAGE SALE IS HELD BY
SEMESTER VI ON OCTOBER 17
The rummage sale held by Semester
6, Saturday October 17, went off with
a bang, and after the mist of red ties,
blue petticoats, pin-stripe pants, and
miscellaneous darky-delights was clear
ed, the mid-term Junior-Senior banquet
was 16 dollars better off.
Miss Wheeler and Miss Tillet bid fair,
to leave off the profession of teaching
to manage department stores, and there
were girls to rival the most able of
O’Henry’s shop girls. To the student-
salesmen, the sale offorded a new study
of human nature. One old negro man
bought a dress and said his boy would
like it for a kind of a “coat suit.” Ano
ther woman who was as big around as
she was tall, seemed never to have but
a nickel, but on seeing something she
wanted, always succeeded in procuring
another. It was worth money to watch
them.
Though the sale was run in competi
tion with about five others, the holders
are highly elated over their success.
    

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