North Carolina Newspapers

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MOTHER’S DAY
GREENSBORO’S JOY
Life
E. D. BROADHURST J
GREENSBORO’S BEST I
From the Gate City of the South and the Birth Place of O. H
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VOLUME VI
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL, GREENSBORO, N. C., MAY 7, 192(
NUMBER 15
Greensboro Third Place
In Annual Music Contest
immense crowd
Winston First and High Point
Second in Ciass A.
BURLINGTON WINS IN CLASS B
Charlotte \'an Noppen, Hazel Thomp
son and Edward Stainback Win
First Places for Greensboro.
Greensboro High School came third in
total niimher of points made in Class A
in the annual North Carolina High School
music contest, held at N. C. C. W. Thurs
day and Friday, April 29 and 30. Win
ston-Salem and High Point won first and
second places respectively. Charlotte
Van Noppen, of Greensboro, won first
place in the violin contest, Edward Stain-
back in unchanged voice solo, and Hazel
Thompson in soprano solo.
Class A, in whidr Greensboro entered,
consisted of schools having an enroll
ment of five hundred or more pupils;
class B consisted of schools with less
than that mmnhier enrolled. Winston-
Salem received the trophy cup in class
A, having a total of 47 points. Burling
ton in class B received first honors with
35 points.
The other places won in class A were
as follows: Orchestra—first place, Wil
mington; second, Winston-Salem; third,
Greensboro. Band—first place, Winston-
Salem; second, Greensboro; third, Le
noir. Violin contest—Greensboro. Mixed
quartet — Winston-Salem. Girls’ glee
club—first, W'inston-Salem; second, High
Point; third, Gastonia; fourth, Greens
boro. Boys’ glee club—Winston-Salem.
Mixed chorus—first, Winston-Salem; sec
ond, High Point; third, Greensboro. Pi
ano contest—^Howard Bagwell, of Win
ston-Salem. Bass solo—Conrad South
ern, of Winston-Salem. Contralto solo—
Ethel Sashmit, of Winston-Salem. Tenor
—George Pardlngton, of Winston-Salem.
Baritone—Hubert Hill, of Winston-Sa
lem. Soprano—Plazel Thompson, of
Greensboro. Solo for hoys with un
changed voice—Edwin Stainback, Greens
boro. Girls’ quartet—Winston-Salem.
Boys’ quartet—Winston-Salem.
The awards in class B were as fol
lows: Orchestra—first, Roanoke Rapids; !
second, Concord; third, Wilmington.
{Continued on page three)
V
III! III! MU
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SENIOR
CALENDAR
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May 6
Senior Tea
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May 13 . .
- Senior Play
Mav 17 .
Senior Take-off's
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May 21 .. .
Farewell Chapel
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May 26-31
Examinations
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June 1-7
— - Senior Week
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June 3 „.
Kiwanis Luncheon
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June 5 - Caps
a.nd Gowns Arrive
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June 5 ..
... . Class Day
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June 6 Baccalaureale Sermon
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June 7 .. ...
Graduation Night
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ANNUAL JUNIOR-
SENIOR BANQUET
HELD AT 0. HENRY
Gillespie and McLeod, Class
Presidents, Lead Way for
Banqueters.
KENNETT BLAIR JESTER
Interesting Program and Delightful
Menu Feature Evening—Quartette
Sings—Miller’s Music Pleases.
SENIORS ARRANGE
FOR GRADUATION
Scn-'op President Appoints Com
mittees to Plan For Gradu
ation and Other Affairs.
The Senior class held one of the most
important meetings of the year, Friday,
April 30, at chapel period in the audi
torium. All matters concerning gradu
ation and senior affairs were discussed.
Glenn Boyd McLeod, the president,
appointed committees to make arrange
ments for Class Day, Senior Take-offs,
Gift to the School, Farewell program,
and file program at the Kiwanis lunch
eon. The matter of the Parent-Senior
tea was discussed and the date decided
on was May 6, at 8 o’clock. Various
groups were selected to make plans for
this affair: Music committee, Frances
Johnson and Charlotte Sergeant; deco
ration committee, Joe Armfield, Jose-
pliinc Abernathy, and I..ola Michaux; re
freshment commitee, Helen Bumpass and
James Watson; arrangement committee,
{Continued on page five)
G. H. S. GIRLS DEFEAT POMONA
NIGHT SCHOOL CLOSES
WITH ENROLLMENT52
Fourth Year of School is Terminated
Friday, April 30. Five Courses
Having Been Offered.
The night school which has been in
session at Greensboro High .School for
several months, ended its term Friday,
April 30, with 52 students finishing.
There were courses in Business English,
Business Arithmetic, Shorthand, Typing,
and Bookkeeping.
This was the fourth year of the night
school. The courses are free except for
the rental of books and are open to any
one wishing to get a firmer foundation
of simple business principles. Messrs.
M illiam York (principal), C. H. My-
rick, C. C. Boyd, and Miss Grace Pullen
Were the teachers in the various courses.
On Thursday, April 29, the G. H. S.
girls defeated the Pomona baseball team
in a peppy game, by a 19 to 6 score; the
game was played in 30 minutes. This
was the first defeat for the Pomona team
and the ninth victory for G. H. S.
The entire G. H. S. team played splen
did ball, both in field work and at the
bat. Noble Hutchinson and Ruth Wat
son played an exceptionally good game
for the winning team.
TEACHERS AND STUDENTS
TO ATTEND EXPOSITION
CHILDREN OF CONFEDERACY
RAISE FUNDS FOR VETERANS
The local chapter of Children of the
Confederacy have raised over if700 by
subscriptions from various citizens of
Greensboro. This will be contributed
toward the fund from which the Civil
M ar veterans will be presented with $10
in gold the 10th of May. The members
of the Daughters of the Confederacy
'"ill serve a dinner to the living veterans
on that day also.
One high school boy and one high
school girl between the ages of 13 and
18 and one high school teacher will be
selected from each state in the Union
to be guests of the sequi-centennial ex
positions which will be held in Philadel
phia this summer.
The students will be chosen on the
basis of heroism, sacrifice, leadership and
patriotism. They will be selected by the
youth of the state, a committee of award
being appointed by the Governor of each
state for the administration of the award
to both youths and teachers.
Included in the award will be a place
of honor during the Fourth of July ob
servances in Philadelphia when President
Coolidge will deliver his oration; a com
memorative medal and certificate; a tour
of Washington, D. C., and Valley Forge,
and a free trip to Philadelphia with all
expenses paid.
Anyone wishing information on the
contest should w-rite to the Sequi-Cen-
tennial Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pa.,
where full details and entry forms may
be secured.
On Friday, April 23, at the O. Henry
hotel, at 8 o'clock, the Juniors enter
tained the Seniors at the annual Junior-
Senior banquet. The reciving line was
composed of the presidents of the two
clrsses, Miss Jane Summerell, Mr. Fred
erick Archer, Miss Laura TiTett, Mr.
C. W. Phillips, and Miss Fannie Starr
Mitchell. Other members of the faculty
leceived at the entrance to the banquet
hair.
John Gillespie, president of the Junior
class, and Glenn Boyd MacI.eod, presi
dent of the Senior class, led the way to
the banquet table where the guests found
their places by means of gay little hand
printed serving maids, Mr. Phillips
said the blessing, after which John Gil
lespie welcomed the guests to the “Mer
maid Tavern” where he was king of the
feast, in an original toast, “Are we all
met?” The response to this welcome was
made by the quartet consisting of Bax
ter Bason, Floyd Mills, Paul Scurlock
and I.eGrande Johnson who sang the
“Stein Song.”
John Gillespie drank the health of the
Seniors in a toast, “We shall not look
upon their like again.” Glenn Boyd Mc
Leod, as queen of the feast, responded.
Kennett Blair, the jester, amused the
banqueters by his gay sallies, some of
which were made at the expense of
guests present.
The remainder of the program fol
lows :
As We IJke It—Mary Jane Wharton.
Response—Glenn Holder.
A Winter’s Tale—Nell Thurman.
Response—Bobbie Wilson.
Love’s Labor Lost—Jack Coble and
Beverly Moore.
Dear Old Pal of Mine—IT. Grady Mil
ler.
{Continued on page three)
MRS. GEORGE DIBBLE
ADDRESSES G.H.S. GIRLS
Members of Stephen’s Revival Party
Gives Very Helpful Address
To Girls April 20.
Thursday, April 29, at the Girls’ For
um, Mrs. George Dibble, of the Stevens
party, gave the girls a very helpful talk.
First a selection was read from the
Bible. In this Mary, Martha and Laz
arus are looking forward to the coming
of Christ. And Jesus appeared and
healed the sick. Jesus had a personality
that always drew a crowd. Mary sur
rendered her life to Christ the first
time she saw him, and afterwards cen
tered all of her time about him.
“Christ changes the life of every girl.
When they are weak and need His help.
He is there to help them.” Mrs. Dibble
{Continued on page five)
TEN STORIES ENTER
FOR O. HENRY PRIZE
The fourth annual short-story contest,
which was open to all Greensboro High
School students, closed Saturday, May 1.
The first year of the contest Jennie Mae
Fife won the cup, while Martha Broad-
hurst was the winner the second and
third years.
Ten stories were turned in to Miss
Laura Tillet, who is in charge of the
{Continued on page five)
CirAIKMAX OF SCIIOOI, BoAliD
Edgar Davis Broadhurst
CMTANS AWARD
BROADHURST CUP
Cup Presented Every Year to
Citizen Rendering Most Un
selfish Service to City.
E. D. Broadhurst, cliairman of the
Greensboro board of education, received
the Civitan trophy ciqi presented ever}'
year to the citizen who lias rendered the
most cons]iicuous and unselfi'ih service
to the city, at tlie meeting of the club
lield Friday, Ajirll 23, at tlie Country
Club. 'The award was made through the
inter-club council, of wliich John W.
Simpson is president.
In making the presentation, Mr. Simp
son characterized Mr. Broadhurst as a
“lawyer, sjieaker, teacher, leader, patri
otic and nn :e!fi:,h citizen, who has seen
the inestimable rich.es locked up m our
young people, and reckless of self, with
out thouglit of personal pecuniary ad-
{t'onliniied on page ftix)
PAPERS SUBMITTED FOR
ANNUAL HISTORY PRIZE
Eleven jiaper.s, each on a different sub
ject, were submitted for the annual his
tory contest which closed April 15. This
contest, which is open only to seniors,
is conducted each year to determine the
winner of the Moreliead loving cup.
Of the pajiers submitted three were
from the class which graduated last Jan
uary, the mid-term graduates not being
permitted to compete for the cup during
the fall semester, since that would mean
that each jierson would possess the cup
only a half-year, which is not in accord
with the wishes of the donor. Those per
sons from the mid-year class who con
tributed papers were Mary I.yon, Ruth
Curtis, and Cecile I/indau. The follow
ing from this spring’s graduating class
submitted papers: Frances Johnson,
Sarah Pearson, Charlotte Van Noppen,
Glenn Boyd Mcl.eod, Edward Menden
hall, Margaret Ferguson, and Henry
Goodwin.
According to the rules of the contest,
the subject, length of the paper, and
oilier details are left open to the choice
of the contestant, except that the sub
ject must pertain to N. C. colonial his
tory. Representative of the subjects
submitted were the following: Social and
Industrial Life in Colonial North Caro
lina, Race Elements in the White Popu
lation of North Carolina During tlie Co
lonial Days, North Carolina the Fore
runner of Independence, The Battle of
Guilford Courthouse, The Part of North
Carolina Women in the Revolution.
Elizabeth Darling was home from Con
verse Easter. She was sporting a new
Chrysler. She spent a day or two in
Charlotte also.
BOYS WEEK IS
OBSERVED BY
Many Events During Week
Stimulate Interest In
Youth of City.
LOYALTY PARADE TODAY
Prize to be Awarded Room and Indi
vidual Having Best Banner Illus
trating Need of Schools.
This week is being observed as Inter-
naticn: 1 Boys' Week throughout the var
ious nations of the world. T'he week,
Lhus far, under the supervision of C. W..
Phillips, has been filled with many events
which have greatly stimulated the inter
est in the modern youth of Greensboro.
Saturday, May 1, was Athletic Day.
In the morning the grammar grades held
a competitive track meet and in the aft
ernoon an inter-clrss meet. Sunday, May
2, was Church Day. The sermons in many
of the churches were especially for the
boys of that church. A boys’ program
was carried out in the chapel programs
of the city schools, Monday. It was the
purjiose of these programs to set forth
more clearly the position of the boy in
the home. M’ednesday was Citizenship’
Day. On May 6, many of the boys vis
ited the different industries in the city..
The most colorful jirogram of the week
is to be carried out today. All the
schools in the city will assemble at Com
merce Square at 2:15 when IT. W. Park
will assume charge of the program. Here
they will form in divisions according to
scliools. I'he line of march is down
Bellemeade street to the O. ITenry hotel,
down Elm street to the station, down
Deiiot street to Greene, and up Greene
to Sternberger street, to Commerce
Square. T'he high school division will
lead the parade. Flvery division will be
organized according to size, boys lead
ing, six abreast. Each boy will he given
a gas balloon to which he will attach his
name. At a signal all balloons will be
turned loose, to float upwards seeking
the clouds. A jirize will be given to
the owner of the balloon which travels
the greatest distance and is returned.
The parade will be colored with gaily
trimmed floats and scattering clowns,
{Continued on page six)
JUNIORS CHOOSE
NINE AS MARSHALS
Finley Atkinson, B. Caviness, J. Coble,
J. Gillespie, P. Wimbish, June
Harris, Sarah Mendenhall, Mary
Wharton, Betty Brown Ass’ts
Tuesday, April 27, at chapel period,
the Junior class held a meeting to elect
the Junior marshals. The meeting was
called to order by the president and
after some busine.ss relating to the Jun
ior-Senior banquet, the elections took
place. Finley Atkisson was elected chief
marshal, and his assistants Bob Cave-
ness. Jack Coble, John Gillespie, Paul
Wimbish, Sarah Mendenhall, Betty
Brown, Jane Harris and Mary Jane
Wharton were chosen.
After this election a sample of the
class rings was shown
SPRING ISSUE OF
HOMESPUN TO PRESS
The last issue of Homespun, which is
the Spring Number, will be sent to press
some time in the near future. The book
opens with an attractive poem on “April”
by Zaidee Smith. This is followed by a
series of sketches entitled “Pastels.” Be
sides numerous short-stories, essays, and
poems, there is an editorial on “The High
School: A Truck Farm.”
    

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