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VOTE
High Life
T
VOTE
From the Gate City of the South and the Birth Place of 0. Henry
V'
OLUME VI
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL, GREENSBORO, N. C., FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1926.
NUMBER 17
High School Dramatic Club
Gives “A Tailor-Made Man”
WELL RECEIVED
Large Audience Witnesses Per
formance At N. C. C. W.
Auditorium on May 13.
GEORGE NEWMAN, JR., STARS
Carlton Wilder As Mr. Huber and
Shelton Dry As Dr. Sonntag
Do Splendid Acting.
George Newman, Jr., supported by an
able cast of 28, starred in A Tailor-
Mude A an. a comedy in four acts, pre
sented by the High School Dramatic
Club, at N. C. C. W. auditorium, on
Thursday, May 13, at 8 o’clock. The
entire production was marked by a fresh
ness seldom found in amateur perform
ances; the actors showed unusual ease
and stage presence, while the thrilling
play held the audience enthralled. Many
remarked that it was the best work
the dramatic club has done this year.
While the star displayed splendid act
ing, hi; success was equaled, in the
opinion of many, but Carlton Wilder as
the tailor, Mr. Huber, and Shelton Dry
as the scholar. Dr. Gustavns Sonntag.
The leading lady, Margaret Ferguson,
and Mrs. Dupy, a divorcee, Glenn Boyd
MacI.eod, were probably the outstand-
inug actresses. John Thornton as Mr.
Rowlands, a newspaper man, and George
Donovant as Peter, Huber's assistant,
also shared in the commendation of the
audience.
The play centered around John Paul
Bart, a worker in a tailor shop hut with
big ideas and ambitions. his smooth
ness and “the brains of another man and
a stolen dress-suit,” as Dr. Sonntag de
scribed it, he made his way to success.
Then, when he was at the height of his
career. Dr. Sonntag threatened to tell
everything about his early life. He im
mediately dictated a story to the Asso
ciated Press telling how he had stolen
the dress-suit from the tailor shop and
returned it the next morning, and how it
had helped him on to success. He then
went back to the tailor shop. The next
day when the whole city was aroused, his
(Continued on page six)
PARENTS NOTICE
VOTE ON MAY 25
On Tuesday, May 25, the voters
of Greensboro will accept or re
ject the proposed plan for the ad
vancement of the city schools. Two
separate ballots will be cast, one
on the 30-cent tax to support a
nine months school, and the other
on the bond issue to provide a
fund for the construction of new
schools and improved equipment.
The rejection of the 30-cent tax
will mean that Greensboro will
have an eight-month term whihh
will automatically make it a “B”
grade school.' Should the tax pass,
but the bond issue be rejected,
Greensboro will continue to have
a nine months term, but improved
facilities wilJ be impossible.
It is imperative that the citizens
of Greensboro, having registered,
vote.
COMPLETE PLANS
FOR ALL SENIOR
CLASS AFFAIRS
Exams to Start May 26-June 1,
State for Making Up
Failures.
SERMON BY DR. MEYERS
Class Day At G. C. Saturday, June 5,
Kiwanis Luncheon for Sen
iors June 3.
The senior graduation plans are com
plete with the exception of the speaker
for commencement night. Mr. Archer
has been conferring with a speaker for
over a week.
May 26 senior exams will begin with
the following schedule: May 26—7th and
8th period classes; May 27—1st and 2nd
G. H. S. WINNERS
ROTARY GUESTS
Van Noppen, Thompson, Stain-
back and King Entertained
by the Rotarians.
period classes; May 28—4th and 5th
period classes; May 31—6th period class.
June 1 will he the day for making up
exams. June 2-4 will he senior week.
During this week several parties and
entertainments are to be given by a few
seniors and for tlie seniors. The Kiwanis
Club will give their annual luncheon for
the seniors June 3. Class day will he
held at the Greensboro College, 5:30 Sat
urday, May 5. All the girls are going
to wear light colored voile dresses. Sun
day, 8:00, June 5, the baccalaureate ser-
(Continued on page five)
G. H. S. STUDENTS
GIVE RADIO PROGRAM
Tlie members of the Rotary Club had
as their guests at a luncheon Wednesday,
May 4, at the Jefferson Club, the Greens
boro winners in the state music con
test, Edward Stainhack, Hazel Thomp
son, Charlotte Van Noppen, and Mary
E. King as accompanist. The Rotarians
were also hosts to their sons.
Hazel Thompson sang “My Birthday”
by Woodman; Charlotte Van Noppen
gave a violin solo, “Indian I.ament,” by
Kreisler, and Edward Stainhack sang
“Gray Days.” These three high school
students won first places for soprano,
violin, and unchanged voice, respectively,
in the music contest held recently.
Before the program a business meeting
was held. Mr. A. Weiland Cooke, re
tiring president, presided, and Mr. Eli
Oettinger was elected president for the
coming year.
Stainhack, Thompson, and Glee Club
Render Several Selections—Henry
Biggs and Dr. Turner Talk.
Friday night. May 28, a few of the
Greensboro High School students gave a
radio program over station W.R.N.C.,
Greensboro, N. C. Henry Biggs gave a
talk on “Vote for Schools.” Edward
Stainhack, state winner of the unchanged
voices, sang two selections, “Mother o’
Mine’ and “Gray Days.” The Boyds’
Glee Club sang “Sweet Rosie O'Grady”
and “School Days.” Hazel Thompson,
winner of the state sonprano solo, sang,
“Her Birthday.”
After the high school students had
broadcasted. Dr. J. Clyde Turner enter
tained the radio listeners with a talk
to the boys of the world, since this was
the Loyalty Day of Boys’ Week.
SCOTT HEADS FACULTY
FOR SUMMER SESSION
SENIOR INVITATIONS.
The following invitations have
issued:
The Faculty and Senior Class
of
Greensboro High School
request the honor of your presence
at their
Commencement Exercises
Odell Memorial
June 7, 1926
Monday Night
been
Mr. R. M. Scott, of the Mclver school,
wil be principal of the summer session
of tlie high school this year. The school,
which will be held as usual, will open
June 14 and continue for a period of
six weeks.
Only the subjects which have been
failed may be taken by the students and
only two of these. Any subject which
a reasonable number of pupils wish to
take will he taught. The hours will be
from 8:30 to 12:30 a.m., but a student
taking only one course will be required
to stay two hours—one for study and one
for recitation.
All the details have not been worked
out as yet, but there will be announce
ments about registering, etc
chapel later.
made in
TROOP 3 OF GIRL SCOUTS
GIVE FLAG TO THE SCHOOL
POINT SYSTEM
Troop three of the Girl Scouts under
the direction of Miss Bullard presented
to tlie high school an American flag
in chapel. May 4. During the rogram,
Doris Hogan and Lizzie Adams Powers
made short talks on the history of the
flag.
Maximum number of points to
be lield by any student- 15. No
student allowed to hold two five-
jioint offices or a five and up office
except where one is prerequisite
of the other—then highest counts.
One Point—Press reporter for
organizations not listed.
Ttvo Points—Secretary-treasurer
of minor clubs, vice-jiresident of
B. A. Association, school cheer
leader, vice-president of girls’ ath
letic association, secretary-treas
urer of B. A. A., electrician, as
sist: nt stage manager, minor role
in play. Torch Light member.
Three points—Member of var
sity team, secretary of class, assist
ant business manager High Life,
Jloniespnn. Reflector: president
minor clubs, lieads of sports, chair
man all standing active committees,
secretary-treasurer D. or D. C.,
member G. Council, press reporter
dramatics, debating. Torch Light,
associate editors of publications,
painters D. C., stage manager.
Four points—Captain of team,
business manager of team, debat
ing team, typing team, president
D and D Clubs, leader of band,
president lower classes, vice-presi
dent G. A. Association, president
G. A. Council, recorder G. A. point
system, secretary G. A. Associa
tion, leading role in play.
Five Points—Member Student
Council, president two upper class
es, president B. A. Association,
president G. A. Association, presi
dent Gen. A. Association, presi
dent Torchlight, property manager.
Six points—Secretary Student
Council, business manager High
Life. Homespun. Reflector, treas
urer Gen. A. Association, business
manager Senior Supply Room.
Seven. Points—Editor-in-chief of
High Life, Homespun, Reflector.
Eight Points—President Student
Body.
NOTE—Subject to change and
suggestions by students next week.
The Council will pass on final sys
tem.
JUST OUT OF COLLEGE
What? “Just Out of College’’
'When? _ Wednesday, May 26
'Who? John Thornton and Sarah
Ferguson with an excellent cast
Where? N. C. C. C. Auditorium
Time . 8:00 o’clock
Why? For an evening’s entertain
ment. COME !
STUDENTS ACT IN
REVIVAL SERVICE
MASS MEETINGS
HELD AS AID FOR
COMING ELECTION
Many Students Express Opin
ions As to Necessity of
Junior Reserves Aid.
E. D. BROADHURST TALKS
Bill Stephens Holds Private
Conferences—Boys’ Glee Club
Sings—Present Mrs. Dib
ble With Gift.
The Stephens Revival Party wliich has
been in the city for five weeks, has de
voted a great deal of time to the high
scliool students. Several niglits have been
given over to the boys and girls of the
high school, at which times some of the
students have partici]iated in tlie pro
grams.
Tnesch..y, May 4, Mrs. George Dibble
spoke on “The Sure Things of I.ife.’’
Edwin Stainhack sang “Gray Days.”
Finley Atkisson, cheerleader of the, high
scliool, led the students in several yells
for file Stephens party. Friday, May
7, George Stephens preached on “The
Real Christian.” Friday night. May 14,
George Stephens spoke on “I'lie Power
of Prayer.” Enoch Elliott and Le Grand
Jolmson gave some selections on tlie har
monic:!. 'llie Boys’ Glee Club sang, and
Baster Bason g;ive a solo.
“Bi'othir Bill” of the Stephens party
has been holding private conferences
with boys at the liigh school in the Pub
lication Room at the fourth, fifth and
si.xth periods.
Teachers and Pupils Offer Cars to
Take Citizens to Register and Vote
—Each Pledge Six Votes.
Friday morning. May 14, the student
body of Greensboro High School held
two mass meetings for the purpose of
jiromoting interest in the coming scliool
election. E. D. Broadhurst, chairman
of the school hoard, was the principal
speaker of the assembly in chapel. On
account of lack of space in the main
auditorium, all standing room being tak
en, over 250 students were forced to
gatlier in ' the basement of tlie new
building.
“I'm trying to work for all of you,”
declared Mr. Broadhurst. “The children
of the town are tlie most precious jios-
sessioiis in a town.” Mr. Broadhurst
stressed tlie vital im]iortance of imme-
di; te registration and of voting “For
Schools.’’ The speaker gave the audi
ence a vivid picture of wliat will be the
result if the pro])osed bill is not passed.
He stated tliat the educational standards
of file community will be lowered; that
tlie hoys and girls attending scliools in
Greensboro will only have the o]iportun-
ity of attending a 714 or 8 months school
term in the future; there will he no new
(Continued on page five)
Mrs. George Dibble, also of the same
party, has spoken to the Girls’ Forum
several times. Slie lias also lield a Bible
ckiss for girls on MYdnesday afternoons.
Friday night. May 14, the girls of G.
H. S. presented Mrs. Dibble with a gift
in a}ipreciation for the splendid work she
has done for them.
DEBATERS TO HONOR
MEMBERS WITH BANQUET
WILLARD WATSON IS
INAUGURATED lAY 20
P. B. Whittington Administers Oath
of Office to New President—Is
Paraphrase of “Athenian” Oath.
Toniglit the Debating Club will give a
banquet in the high school cafeteria at
eiglit o'clock in lionor of the members
who liave joined since its organization
last February. Just preceding the ban
quet there will be an initiation of the
new members.
An attractive jirogram has been ar
ranged, carrying out the word.s, “Debat
ing Club’’; that is, the name of each
toast begins with a letter of these words.
The jiurple and gold scheme of decora
tion will be carried out. Roses and
sweet peas will also be used.
George MeSwain will he toastmaster,
while the other speakers will be Louis
Brooks, Harry Gump, Edgar Kuyken
dall, Henry Biggs, Margaret Hood, J.
D. McNairy, and Carlton Wilder. A
splendid time is looked forward to by
the members of the club as the banquet
brings to a clima.x Debating Week.
'Willard Watson, recently-elected pres
ident of the- student body, was inaugu
rated yesterday morning at a special
mass meeting lield on tlie grounds be
tween the main building and tlie barns.
P. B. Whittington, retiring president, ad
ministered tlie oath of office, a para
phrase of the “Athenian Oath.”
After the simple, impressive inaugu
ration ceremonies, tlie students took the
oath of fidelity to the new president.
Members of tlie student council were on
the ]ilalform behind the president during
tlie inauguration. President-elect Wat
son received a hearty ovation as he went
forward to receive tlie oath of office.
Tlie entire student body took part in
tlie mass meeting, wliich began at 8:50
and lasted until 9:15. 'I’liis is one of the
very few occasions this year when all the
students of Greensboro Liigh were as
sembled in one place.
JUNIOR AND SENIOR BOYS
CELEBRATE INDUSTRY DAY
MAY LIFE-SAVING MONTH
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL
The month of May has been set aside
as “Life Saving Month.” Swimming les
sons are given by instructors and exam
iners at the Y. W. C. A. every day.
Juniors from twelve to seventeen years
old meet on Mondays and Wednesday;
seniors from seventeen years and up
meet on Tuesday and Thursdays.
The last week of May, officials from
headquarters will be here to give tests
to those who want to become life savers,
examiners, or swimming instructors.
Thursday, May 6, in connection with
Boys’ Week was celebrated all over the
country as “Boys’ Day’’ in industry. All
junior and senior hoys were permitted to
observe some business or industry.
Groups were formed at different periods
during the day, at the convenience of
tlie managers and proprietors of the es
tablishments visited.
Mr. Charles Ketchum assisted greatly
in successfuliy carrying forward the pro
ject. Among the places visited were
White Oak Mills, Station W. N. R. C.,
O. Henry Hotel, O. Henry Drug Store,
Vick Chemical Company, Greensboro
Daily News, American Exchange Nation
al Bank, Dixie Sales Auto Assembling
Plant, and Bynum and Hobgood Law
Offices.
    

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